III. DOS FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES

East Asia and Pacific Region

AUSTRALIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

50

$713,376

50

$993,132

TOTAL

50

$713,376

50

$993,132

Australia represents the southern anchor of our Asia-Pacific alliance network. A high degree of interoperability between our forces is a hallmark of the U.S.-Australia alliance, demonstrated most recently in our mutual efforts to bring peace and stability to East Timor. A robust schedule of combined military exercises and training are concrete examples of our enduring commitment to Australia's security and to our interoperability goals. In addition to sharing and promoting regional and international security goals, the U.S. and Australia work closely to advance human rights, democracy, nonproliferation and other global issues.

To help strengthen Australia's combat capabilities and readiness, the U.S. provided air combat training in FY 1999 and proposes to do so again in FY 2000.

CHINA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Asia-Pacific Center

0

0

4

$64,842

TOTAL

0

0

4

$64,842

The United States seeks a constructive relationship with China, one that contributes to peace in Asia. We share common interests in a number of areas, such as the maintenance of stability in Asia permitting the continuation of that region's economic development, the maintenance of peace on the Korean Peninsula and in South Asia and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The U.S. considers dialogue with the PRC essential to ensure a clear understanding of one another's regional security interests and concerns and to help promote a constructive role by the PRC in the international community. We have differences with China, but dialogues allow us to work together where we agree and to make clear where we do not.

As one step in the renewal of a defense and security dialogue, the U.S. proposes the PRC's participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses in FY 2000, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. PRC participation in these courses will be consistent with the guidelines set for in the Defense Authorization Act of 2000. The PRC participants in the program will be from think tanks.

FIJI
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

0

0

6

$80,151

Asia-Pacific Center

1

$53,523

1

$15,772

TOTAL

1

$53,523

7

$95,923

Renewal of our IMET program with Fiji will signal U.S. pleasure with Fiji's democratic progress, as evidenced by the holding of successful, free and credible elections last May. Fiji joined regional nations (New Zealand, Australia, Vanuatu, Tonga) in sending peace monitors to oversee the truce/restoration of civilian control on Papua New Guinea's Bougainville Island province. IMET will provide professional education and training for Fiji's Defense Force with emphasis on respect for human rights, civilian control of the military, and military justice.

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Fiji, the U.S. welcomed their participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Fiji. The U.S. proposes Fiji participation in Asia-Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

INDONESIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

79

$308,694

0

0

Asia-Pacific Center

10

$123,095

0

0

TOTAL

89

$431,789

0

0

The U.S. has important security, political, and economic/commercial interests in Indonesia. Indonesia's size and location, 200 million plus population (fourth-largest in the world), and natural resources (notably oil and gas) give it broad strategic value. A stable and prosperous Indonesia is key to Southeast Asian and regional stability. Indonesia is undergoing a wrenching transition from the authoritarianism of the Soeharto era to a more democratic society. It is in our interest to see the Indonesian government (GOI) complete this transition, as well as undertake the economic structural reforms that will help restore economic growth and further Indonesia's integration into the global economy. The U.S. has important strategic and commercial interests in access to internationally recognized sea-lanes and straits that pass through Indonesian waters.

Indonesia is active and generally supportive of U.S. diplomatic initiatives. As the largest member of ASEAN and a founder of the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF), Indonesia has played a responsible role in helping manage regional problems such as the South China Sea dispute. It has enhanced its regional and global influence though leadership roles in the United Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement, the Organization of the Islamic Conference, and the G-77. Indonesia is one of the four countries the Secretary of State has identified as critical to the promotion of democracy.

Our E-IMET program and other normal military-military ties were suspended in 1999 because of human rights abuses in East Timor, except the E-IMET students attending courses at the time were allowed to complete their program using other funding sources. To all for the possibility that the new Indonesian government will make sufficient progress in reform of the military to meet the conditions for resuming military assistance established by Section 589 of the Foreign Operations Export Financing and Related Programs Appropriations Act, Fiscal Year 2000, as contained in the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act, Fiscal Year 2000, PL 106-113, we have provided for a resumption of IMET training in FY 2001.

Before suspension, the E-IMET program aimed at positively influencing the Indonesian military's (TNI) professionalism and discipline and heightening the Indonesian military's awareness of principles of good civil-military relations and international human rights standards. Such assistance also recognized Indonesia's key role on regional security issues, and helps to ensure U.S. access to Indonesia's airspace and strategic sea-lanes. The EIMET program thus focussed on training related to civil-military relations, legal issues in military and peace operations, including law of war. We had also included English language training essential to furthering mil-mil contacts.

Before suspension of EIMET, Indonesia officers also participated in resource management, information technology and engineering science training, courses designed to increase professionalization of military officers in various disciplines and expose them to U.S. standards. These and mobile training team courses on interdiction planning and port security helped our effort to assure support from the Indonesia military and its ability to ensure U.S. access to sea lanes and provide secure port facilities. Indonesian officers also participated in training at the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts.

JAPAN
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

0

0

300

$78,000

Service Academy

0

0

2

$10,000

TOTAL

0

0

302

$88,000

Our security alliance with Japan is the linchpin of overall U.S. security policy in Asia. The alliance makes a fundamental and continuing contribution to the defense of Japan and to regional peace and stability. Our engagement with Japan in the Asia-Pacific region to promote mutual security extends beyond our military bases in Japan to encompass a comprehensive program of military-to-military contacts, combined training and exercises, and equipment interoperability. These efforts demonstrate our combined capabilities and resolve, improve readiness and promote burden sharing. Training contacts, whether in the field or in the classroom, also serve to foster and continually renew an understanding of the culture, values and habits of our most important Asian ally and vice versa.

As a means of maintaining the close defense ties outlined above, the U.S. welcomed Japanese participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses in FY 1999, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and in the National Defense University's International Fellows Program, designed to prepare military and civilian leaders for service at the highest levels of national defense and security. The U.S. proposes similar Japanese participation in Asia-Pacific Center courses in FY 2000, as well as participation in the U.S. Air Force Academy's semester exchange program.

To help strengthen Japan's combat capabilities and readiness, the U.S. provided training in FY 1999 on an interoperable naval weapons system and proposes in FY 2000 to provide support to a Japanese ground element during bilateral training.

KIRIBATI
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Asia-Pacific Center

1

$10,368

0

0

TOTAL

1

$10,368

0

0

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Kiribati, the U.S. welcomed their participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Kiribati.

KOREA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Exchanges

11

$200

9

$250

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

2383

$1,486,121

6520

$3,339,469

Service Academy

3

$74,237

0

0

TOTAL

2397

$1,560,558

6529

$3,339,719

Since the Korean War, the Republic of Korea has proven a strategically important and reliable defense treaty ally. While efforts to reduce tensions on the Korean Peninsula are underway, the U.S. and the ROK continue to maintain and strengthen the three major elements of our security alliance: the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty, strong bilateral ties and combined military forces. U.S. and ROK forces unified under the Combined Forces Command continue to enhance their capabilities to deter and, if necessary, defeat aggression. To sharpen readiness, the Command is continually refining its vigorous program of training and exercises.

To maintain the strong sense of shared values and purpose that underlies the U.S.-ROK alliance, the U.S. welcomed ROK participation in the National Defense University's International Fellows Program, designed to prepare military and civilian leaders for service at the highest levels of national defense and security. ROK students also attended U.S. service academies and ROK personnel participated in exchanges with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The U.S. proposes ROK participation in FY 2000 in additional Corps of Engineers exchanges.

The U.S. provided training in FY 1999 designed to strengthen ROK combat capabilities and interoperability with U.S. forces. This training was in areas such as joint and combined operations, and live fire and maneuver. A key element of U.S.-ROK force integration will continue in FY 2000 through the KATUSA solider program, in which ROK troops are trained by and integrated into U.S. units in Korea, with the aim of improving U.S.-ROK operational capabilities.

LAOS
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Asia-Pacific Center

8

$107,844

6

$97,263

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

251

$1,062,849

0

0

TOTAL

259

$1,170,693

6

$97,263

Our military training with Laos has focused around our humanitarian demining program. In FY99, over 250 Laotian officials were trained in an effort to enable Laos to develop a self-sustaining training capacity. Over 815 Laotians have been trained as demining technicians, medics, community (mine) awareness experts, team leaders, and instructors since the beginning of operations in FY94.

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Laos, the U.S. welcomed their participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Laos. The U.S. proposes Laos participation in Asia-Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

MALAYSIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

152

$425,941

149

$316,057

Asia-Pacific Center

10

$133,861

5

$74,952

Section 1004

46

$88,658

40

$125,000

Service Academy

0

0

1

$17,500

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

47

$88,658

30

$125,000

TOTAL

255

$737,118

225

$658,509

The U.S. has important security interests in Malaysia, a key member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) which joined the UN Security Council as a non-permanent member last year. A public supporter of our forward deployed presence in Asia, Malaysia borders one of the world's most important maritime waterways. The U.S. military benefits from transit rights over Malaysian territory and access to Malaysian ports and airfields.

IMET contributes significantly to the strengthening of our military-to-military ties, and familiarizes the Malaysian military with U.S. doctrine, equipment, and management techniques. IMET training also reinforces the Malaysian military's commitment to human rights and good civil-military relations, and helps expand our access to and cooperation with Malaysian military leaders. Malaysia is also active in multinational peacekeeping operations, which necessitate training that promotes interoperability. Malaysia is also engaged in training that will improve the military's ability to combat narcotics trafficking and money laundering operations.

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Malaysia, the U.S. welcomed its participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Malaysia. The U.S. proposes their participation in Asia-Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

MARSHALL ISLANDS
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Asia-Pacific Center

3

$38,316

0

0

TOTAL

3

$38,316

0

0

As a means of strengthening defense ties with the Marshall Islands, the U.S. welcomed their participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the Marshall Islands.

MICRONESIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Asia-Pacific Center

2

$27,948

0

0

TOTAL

2

$27,948

0

0

As a means of strengthening defense ties with the Micronesia, the U.S. welcomed its participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Micronesia.

MONGOLIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

99

$295,329

115

$252,617

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

31

$207,000

0

0

Asia-Pacific Center

7

$96,678

6

$97,263

TOTAL

137

$599,007

121

$349,880

It is in the U.S. national interest to support Mongolia's transformation into a secure, democratic and stable country that can contribute to the security and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region. IMET training for Mongolia in FY 1999 was designed to further that interest by promoting civilian control of the military, military justice and law, and respect for international human rights standards. FY 1999 IMET training also facilitated strengthened U.S.-Mongolia military-to-military ties and common military understanding and values by providing English language training and basic military training in communications, logistics and maintenance, intelligence, military medicine, and defense and resource management. The U.S. will provide IMET training with similar objectives in FY 2000, adding chemical officer training and training in personnel, finance, transportation and disaster readiness. Mongolian officers also are slated to attend U.S. senior service schools (i.e., command and general staff).

To strengthen defense ties, the U.S. welcomed Mongolian participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses in FY 1999, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The U.S. proposes similar Mongolian participation in these courses in FY 2000.

[end of file]

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