Department Seal Foreign Military Training and DoD
Engagement Activities of Interest, Volume I

Joint Report to Congress, March 1, 2000
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III. DOS FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES

Europe Region

ALBANIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

126

$260,150

116

$515,086

Service Academy

1

$74,237

0

0

Marshall Center

29

$438,944

4

$50,544

TOTAL

156

120

$575,630

Albania is a very cooperative and rapidly emerging security partner of the U.S. and NATO in Southeastern Europe. Albania's security relationship with the U.S. and Allied forces has grown exponentially over the past year with the onset and aftermath of the Kosovo crisis. A primary U.S. goal in Albania is to employ the current atmosphere of cooperation in a manner that helps to lead to long-lasting stability in Albania and the region as a whole.

U.S. military training efforts in Albania are a crucial means to this end. In particular, training under the IMET program is consistent with our goals of assisting in Albanian defense restructuring efforts and in fostering an Albanian ability to patrol its land and sea borders. More fundamentally, U.S. training is helping Albania to reconstitute a national military that was decimated by the country's internal strife in 1997. These efforts will help to bring Albania more firmly into the Euro-Atlantic community, to increase Albania's ability to participate in PfP exercises and activities, and, particularly given Albania's status as an aspirant for eventual Alliance membership, to augment its interoperability with NATO forces.

Albanian soldiers have been taking IMET courses in FY 1999 and FY 2000 that have helped to meet those broad goals. Courses in civil-military relations, military law, English language, topographic analysis, and logistics are cases in point. Albanian officers also have received advanced training at the naval staff and command colleges, the air command and staff college, the National Defense University, and the joint/combined staff officer school. In addition, with the unrest in neighboring Kosovo clearly in mind, it is not surprising that over the past year the Albanian military also has favored training that has had an operational nature to it. The ranger, field artillery, signal officer, airborne, and infantry captain classes are evidence of this approach.

Albania has used its Foreign Military Financing grants more for the purchasing and refurbishing of U.S.-origin equipment than to buy additional military training. Albania has been an active recipient of U.S.-funded training at the Marshall Center in Germany, though. Thirty-three uniformed and civilian Albanian defense officials participated in conferences and seminars at the Marshall Center in FY 1999 and FY 2000. Discussions at the center focus on augmenting civilian control of the military and on the other key military reforms needed in the states of Central Europe and the former Soviet Union during their various stages of democratic transition.

BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

106

$269,100

101

$348,909

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command

76

$1,566,000

0

0

Service Academy

1

$74,237

0

0

Marshall Center

11

$166,496

49

$741,664

TOTAL

194

150

The 1992-95 conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina threatened both European stability and NATO's cohesion. The United States led the negotiations that led to the signing of the Dayton Peace Accords in 1995, which successfully ended the fighting in Bosnia. The U.S. plays the lead role in the Dayton peace implementation process - the first real test for post-Cold War European security. Implementing the Dayton Accords, and thereby securing peace and stability in Bosnia and the region, is a crucial element in the maintenance of peace and stability in Europe. A key aspect of that implementation is the training of the Bosnian Federation's military, largely conducted as part of the U.S.-led Train and Equip program. This training helps to develop and maintain a stabilizing military balance in Bosnia and Herzegovina and fosters increased understanding of and respect for human rights and civilian control of the military.

A peaceful, democratic, and stable Bosnia and Herzegovina that respects international human rights standards is a key part of maintaining peace and stability in Europe and promoting U.S. national security. U.S. government policy in Bosnia, and therefore U. S. government assistance, including its assistance in military training, is targeted to full implementation of the peace accords and the development of democratic institutions and respect for human rights. In addition, US assistance helps to leverage funding from other donors.

Under the Train and Equip program, the U.S. has supplied defense services, including training, to the Federation entity's military since 1996, to help establish military stability in Bosnia and Herzegovina and prevent renewed hostilities. It is crucial that we protect the investment we have made since the Dayton peace accords by ensuring that the equipment delivered does not deteriorate because of a lack of training or other resources. As a result, FMF funding will continue to assist the Bosnian Federation military in sustaining USG-supplied equipment, including training Federation soldiers in its use. For instance, in FY 2001, the Federation will use $550,000 for specialized aviation training courses (for example, flight surgeon and maintenance test pilot training) in the U.S. that are not available through the IMET program.

Training of Federation forces under the International Military Education and Training (IMET) program will continue to contribute to regional stability, helping to foster the eventual withdrawal of US forces currently serving as part of the NATO-led Stabilization Force (SFOR). In FY 1999 and FY 2000, Federation soldiers have been undergoing IMET training in such areas as English language, civil-military relations, officer preparation, and defense management. In FY 2001, IMET funds will continue to be used to supplement the training provided through the Train and Equip program, with emphasis on junior officer professional development (Army basic and advanced courses), staff training for mid-level officers (service staff colleges), and E-IMET courses for mid- to upper-level officials in the defense sector.

In addition, separate unified command engagement activities have funded the training of Federation and Republika Srpska forces in humanitarian demining techniques and the establishment of military demining training centers. Bosnian officials also have received training through courses at the Marshall Center, which provides instruction in democratic processes and civil-military relations for civilian and uniformed defense personnel throughout Central Europe and the Newly Independent States.

BULGARIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

118

$351,116

125

$459,501

Aviation Leadership Program

1

$858

   

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

18

$82,325

52

$134,955

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

2

0

0

0

Service Academy

4

$296,948

1

$17,500

Marshall Center

14

$211,904

81

$1,226,016

TOTAL

157

259

$1,837,972

Bulgaria is very important for our foreign policy goals for Southeast Europe and has emerged as a regional leader in promoting political, military, and economic stability and strengthening democratic institutions. Bulgaria is undertaking a major reorganization of its defense establishment and is actively pursuing NATO membership. The United States supports Bulgaria's continued efforts to strengthen democracy and the rule of law and to move toward fuller integration with the greater Euro-Atlantic community.

Professional military training is reaching a critical stage for the Bulgarian armed forces as the Government proceeds with the massive military reorganization outlined in the Defense Reform 2004 project. The IMET program has been a key aspect of the reorganization so far, and will be crucial for the ultimate success of the reform. U.S.-trained officers are in positions of responsibility, including the Deputy Minister of Defense in charge of defense planning and most of his staff. NCO training will continue to be a key feature of the U.S. training effort, reflecting the crucial importance of creating a more western-style NCO corps for the overall success of the reorganization plan.

Specific IMET training courses taken by Bulgarian officers in FY 1999 and FY 2000 have focused on a several key areas. Bulgarian soldiers have taken classes in logistics officer training, security assistance management, English language instruction, psychological operations, and have attended the staff and war colleges, among other areas. IMET courses in FY 2001 also will continue to concentrate on professional military education, civilian/military relations, and national security affairs.

Training under Foreign Military Financing (FMF), usually provided in country through FMF-funded Mobile Training Teams (MTTs), also continues to be important for fostering the Bulgarian military's interoperability with NATO, as it aspires to alliance membership and increasingly contributes to regional stability. English language instruction has been a particular focus of MTTs in Bulgaria. MTTs also trained Bulgaria in the use of its Air Sovereignty Operations Center, which helps to provide integrated radar coverage of Bulgarian airspace, including distinguishing between civilian and military aircraft.

Bulgarian soldiers and civilian defense officials also have received U.S.-funded instruction at the Marshall Center in Germany. The Marshall Center focuses on providing training through courses, conferences, and seminars in democratic processes and civil-military relations for uniformed and civilian defense personnel for countries throughout Central and Eastern Europe.

CROATIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

165

$407,409

190

$513,732

INL

0

0

60

0

Service Academy

7

$296,947

1

$17,500

Marshall Center

15

$227,040

8

$121,088

TOTAL

187

259

$652,320

Helping Croatia to complete its transition into a democratic, non-nationalist, and Western-oriented state firmly embedded in the Euro-Atlantic community is important to ensuring the long-term establishment of a stable Croatia and will contribute significantly to the security of the entire Balkan region. It is in the U.S. interest to support the democratic changes that the citizens of Croatia overwhelmingly voted for in the elections of January and February 2000. We can assist this nation in shedding its destructive, nationalist past, as it moves to more fully embrace democracy, human and civil rights, and Euro-Atlantic integration. Our goal is to ensure Croatia continues on its path of becoming a fully reliable partner in Europe, and our military training efforts are part of the means to reach that goal.

The democratic changes occurring in Croatia could promote similar changes throughout the region, and Croatia should develop into an anchor of stability for the Balkans. Along those lines, IMET funds have fostered appreciation among Croatian military officials for the proper role of the armed forces in a democracy. IMET proved to be a critical aspect of our engagement with Croatia over the past several years. Mil-mil activities were one of our strongest avenues of cooperation with the previous Croatian government, and IMET-trained officers also helped Croatia begin to implement basic defense reforms during the period. It is in the U.S. government's interest for such cooperation to continue to develop under the new Croatian government. In FY 1999 and FY 2000, Croatia concentrated its IMET training in several key areas. English language, civil-military relations, defense management, and military police courses were areas of focus, as were army, navy, and air force command and staff courses.

Croatian MOD personnel, both civilian and military, also have received U.S. funding for training at the Marshall Center. The Marshall Center offers courses, conferences, and seminars in both democratic processes and civilian control of the military for uniformed servicemen and civilian defense personnel from countries in Central Europe and the former Soviet Union. Seven Croatian students also attended U.S. service academies in FY 1999. The Croatian navy also has benefited from a Department of Defense-funded Mobile Training Team focused on assessing Croatia's maritime capabilities and the challenges faced in managing its maritime affairs. Furthermore, if the newly elected government in Zagreb advances toward membership in the Partnership for Peace, the U.S. government also would reexamine the question of providing Croatia training under additional security assistance programs.

ESTONIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

48

$296,026

50

$373,378

INL

0

0

30

0

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

30

$147,473

78

$297,940

Unified Command Engagement Activities

0

0

1

0

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

77

$110,000

0

0

Service Academy

4

$240,211

1

$17,500

Marshall Center

10

$151,360

13

$196,768

TOTAL

169

$945,070

173

$887,586

Estonia and the other Baltic States have helped to set the pace among transitioning Central and Eastern European states in their integration into Western security structures. The prime U.S. objectives in Estonia are to strengthen civil society, bolster democratic and market institutions, assist in the integration of non-citizens into Estonian society, and encourage civilian-controlled, NATO-compatible defense forces.

NATO compatible training for Estonian defense forces will open the door to Estonia's continued participation in missions beyond their current involvement in the Stabilization Force (SFOR) in Bosnia and the United Nations Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).

Participation in Professional and Military Education helps to develop professional skills for Estonian soldiers. Courses in English language, Command and General Staff, Security Assistance, and advanced management courses help Estonia and the U.S. to develop a common perspective on leadership and management. Specialty training in Logistics, Intelligence, Field Artillery, Maintenance, Explosive Ordinance Disposal, Amphibious Warfare, Infantry training, and maritime boarding help develop critical skills necessary to enhance regional security and improve Partnership for Peace (PfP) initiatives and will help Estonia carry out crisis response operations, including those involving NATO forces.

As Estonia prioritizes resources for its own legitimate defense needs and for its contribution to the overall security in Europe, IMET has a significant multiplier effect by training trainers and giving more junior officers the leadership and administrative skills to take over from a previous generation of officers which operated under Soviet-era guidelines. This support will help keep Estonia focused on the practical steps necessary to continue to improve its NATO candidacy, support Estonia's participation in the full range of PfP exercises, and allow Estonian forces to integrate with NATO equipment and standards.

LATVIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

74

$242,419

71

$244,731

Service Academy

1

$74,237

0

0

Marshall Center

16

$242,176

50

$756,800

INL

10

0

0

0

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

88

$124,764

168

$782,559

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

78

$70,000

0

0

TOTAL

267

$753,596

289

Latvia and the other Baltic States have helped to set the pace among transitioning Central and Eastern European states in their integration into Western security structures. The prime U.S. objectives in Latvia are to continue to help strengthen civil society, further bolster democratic and market institutions, and encourage the continued development of civilian-controlled, NATO-compatible defense forces.

NATO-compatible training for Latvian defense forces keeps the door open for Latvia's efforts to enhance regional security by improving relations with all neighboring countries. Such training helps Latvia to play an active role in the Partnership for Peace (PfP) and other Euro-Atlantic institutions.

Latvia's participation in Professional and Military Education helps to develop the professional skills of senior officers. Courses in English language, Command and General Staff, Security Assistance, and advanced management help us to develop a common perspective with Latvian officers on leadership and management. Specialty training in Logistics, Maintenance, Physical Security, maritime boarding and Infantry training help develop the critical skills necessary to enhance regional security and improve the capabilities of the Latvian armed forces in both the internal self-defense and multinational crisis response arenas.

As Latvia prioritizes its resources for its own legitimate defense needs and for its contribution to overall security in Europe, IMET has a significant multiplier effect by training trainers and giving more junior officers the leadership and administrative skills to take over from previous officers who operated under Soviet guidelines. This support will help keep Latvia focused on the practical steps toward NATO, support its participation in the full range of PfP exercises, and allow its armed forces to integrate further with NATO equipment and standards.

LITHUANIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

65

$305,483

63

$386,219

Service Academy

3

$222,711

0

0

Marshall Center

16

$242,176

58

$877,888

INL

30

0

0

0

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

2

$32,990

51

$133,116

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

72

$80,000

0

0

TOTAL

188

$883,360

172

$1,397,223

Lithuania has helped to set the pace among transitioning Central and Eastern European states in its integration into Western security structures. Northern Europe's security depends on Baltic stability and proper Baltic-Russian relations. Lithuania looks to the United States as one of its primary guides as it works to enhance its security.

As Lithuania prioritizes resources for its own legitimate defense needs and for its contribution to the overall security of Europe, training has a significant multiplier effect by training trainers and by giving more junior officers leadership and administrative skills. This will help them to be able to take over from the previous generation of officers that operated under the Soviet-era system.

NATO-compatible training for Lithuanian defense forces will assist Lithuania in its efforts to enhance security in the region. With the help of such training, Lithuania will be able to play an even more active role in the Partnership for Peace (PfP) and other international and Euro-Atlantic institutions, thereby enhancing regional stability.

Lithuania's participation in Professional and Military Education helps to develop the professional skills of senior officers. Courses in English language, Command and General Staff, Security Assistance and advanced management courses help Lithuania and the U.S. to develop a common perspective on leadership and management.

Specialty training in Logistics, Explosive Ordinance Disposal, Maintenance, Physical Security, maritime boarding and Infantry training help to develop critical skills necessary to enhance regional security and to improve the internal self-defense capabilities of Lithuanian armed forces. This support will also help keep Lithuania focus on the practical steps toward further advancing its NATO candidacy, supporting its participation in the full range of PfP and "in the spirit of PfP" exercises, and allowing its armed forces to integrate further with NATO equipment and standards.

MACEDONIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

71

$189,941

79

$262,803

Marshall Center

6

$90,816

17

$257,312

Service Academy

2

$148,474

0

0

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

131

$138,277

0

0

TOTAL

210

$567,508

96

$520,115

The U.S. has a key interest in the peace and stability of The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (Macedonia) and of Southeastern Europe as a whole. Our bilateral and regional interests lie in furthering the successful Macedonian model of a working multi-ethnic democracy, with constructive relations with all neighbors, and strong, stable political institutions. The United States has a compelling stake in reinforcing Macedonia against external threats to its stability and facilitating its integration into the Euro-Atlantic mainstream; our military training programs are a key aspect of this effort.

FMF and IMET support professional military education; training in such areas as defense resource management, logistics and acquisition reform; and self-defense training consistent with the U.S. and NATO goal of restructuring the Macedonian military and assisting it to patrol its border and provide a first-line military deterrent. As a NATO aspirant, Macedonia has committed to restructuring its military and moving it toward NATO standards. The Kosovo crisis of 1999 fully engaged the government and military of Macedonia, causing delays in various military projects and necessitating the rescheduling of training programs which had been planned earlier. Despite this, the Macedonian military continued to make good use of U.S. military training and equipment and can be expected to fully utilize current and future opportunities. One important project, the establishment and training of a non-commissioned officer (NCO) corps, has made good progress, and is recognized by the Macedonians as essential in their efforts to restructure according to NATO standards.

Courses offered under the IMET program in FY 1999 and FY 2000 cover a range of key areas. Macedonian soldiers have participated in senior professional military education courses at U.S. war colleges and command and staff colleges, as well as an array of other officer development training. IMET has also funded training in defense resource management, acquisition, logistics and security assistance management; technical courses such as air traffic control and airborne/special operations; Non-Commissioned Officer training and English language instruction. Mobile education teams and mobile training teams have also provided instruction on civil-military relations, maritime law enforcement and health resource management issues. This IMET training has improved Macedonia's interoperability with NATO, enhanced its ability to participate in PfP exercises, and augmented its contribution to Balkan peace and stability.

FMF continues to be utilized to fund the services of an American contract firm, to provide guidance, advice, and instruction to Macedonian defense planners undertaking the military restructuring process. The contractor is also helping Macedonia develop its own officer and NCO education system, which will focus on many of the same areas of instruction offered by U.S. training courses. FMF also has been used for English language training and for instruction in equipment maintenance.

The Marshall Center in Germany has also provided U.S.-funded training to Macedonian defense officials, both civilians in the MOD and uniformed military personnel. Through the use of seminars and conferences, the Marshall Center concentrates on instructing students from Central and Eastern Europe in subjects such as civil control of the military. Macedonia also had two students receiving instruction at the U.S. Air Force Academy in FY 1999.

In an additional source of training, Macedonia has used the NATO KFOR presence as an opportunity to familiarize officers with NATO procedures. It has sought and engaged in joint training opportunities with tactical NATO units present in Macedonia.

MALTA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

8

$13,526

7

$57,478

Malta is strategically located in the Mediterranean, in close proximity to Italy and Libya. U.S. national interests in Malta include enduring Malta's pro-Western orientation and checking Libyan influence. U.S. assistance to Malta in money and training enhances its ability to participate in regional security activities of importance to the United States, including matters involving counter-narcotics, counter-terrorism, interdiction of embargoed goods to restricted countries and interdiction of weapons of mass destruction materials in transit through Malta's waters. Specialty training such as Infantry basics and Intelligence support those actions and Professional military education fosters better understanding and enhances military to military relationships.

ROMANIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

281

$522,101

278

$653,084

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

253

$626,266

5

$10,200

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

88

$79,000

0

0

Service Academy

2

$148,474

0

0

Marshall Center

23

$348,128

74

$1,120,064

TOTAL

647

$1,389,969

357

The U.S. is assisting in Romania's continued development as a western-oriented democracy at peace with its neighbors and respectful of human rights. As the largest country in size and population in Southeast Europe, Romania can make a significant contribution to security in a troubled region, and U.S.-funded military training is helping Romania to continue to develop that ability. Presidents Clinton and Constantinescu declared a "Strategic Partnership" between the U.S. and Romania in 1997, and U.S. training of the Romanian military is a clear demonstration of that partnership.

U.S. bilateral military assistance is focused on helping Romania contribute to stability in Southeast Europe by establishing and training a strong, efficient military under effective civilian control and enjoying a cooperative relationship with NATO, including through active participation in the Partnership for Peace. Training Romania's military also is helping Bucharest to strengthen its NATO candidacy. Our Foreign Military Financing (FMF) assistance includes a $2 million program under which the U.S. Marine Corps is helping Romania develop and train a modern NCO corps on NATO-interoperable standards. Ten USMC NCO trainers are on the ground in Romania now instructing Romanian NCO trainers.

We are also working to support implementation of a defense reform plan adopted by the Ministry of Defense in 1999l. As part of that effort, we will provide advice and assistance on how to downsize and further professionalize the Romanian military and make it more interoperable with NATO. FMF also assists with English language training through the purchase of language labs.

IMET training will continue to expose the new generation of the Romanian military to professional military education. In order to continue to improve Romania's interoperability with NATO, the GOR continues to be determined to expose as many officers as possible to U.S. military training and to make good use of graduates of IMET training in future assignments. The Romanian military has received a wide range of types of training through the IMET program in an effort to improve its readiness in all sectors. In FY 1999 and FY 2000, Romanian officers have taken classes on, among other subjects, amphibious warfare, field artillery, infantry, topographic analysis, military police, civil-military relations, defense resource and security assistance management, logistics, and English language and have attended the naval staff and army and air war colleges.

Uniformed Romanian soldiers and civilian defense officials also have received U.S.-funded training at the Marshall Center in Germany. The Center concentrates on providing courses, conferences, and seminars on civil-military relations in the developing democracies of Central Europe and the Newly Independent States. The U.S. has funded the attendance of 97 Romanian students at the Marshall Center in FY 1999 and FY 2000. Romania also had two cadets receiving instruction at the U.S. Air Force Academy in FY 1999.

SLOVAKIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

105

$341,216

110

$358,417

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

77

$104,805

2

$8,020

Marshall Center

11

$166,496

58

$877,888

TOTAL

193

170

Slovakia is at the geographic center of Europe and is nearly surrounded by the three new NATO member states. It has its own strong aspirations to join the alliance. The U.S. supports Slovakia's continued economic and political reform and the continued development of its candidacy for Euro-Atlantic institutions, including NATO. The IMET program and other types of training and education help Slovakia to play an increasingly active role as a regional defense and security partner and to prepare the country for possible future NATO membership. Training and education will also enhance Slovakia's participation in Partnership for Peace (PfP) activities by providing U.S. and NATO-compatible training.

Slovakia's participation in Professional and Military Education helps to develop the professional skills of senior officers, respect for the rule of law and human rights, and a greater understanding of the concept of civilian control of the military. Courses in English language, Security Assistance, and advanced management help Slovakia and the U.S. to develop a common perspective on leadership and management.

Specialty training in Air Traffic Control, Systems Control, and Infantry training help to develop critical skills necessary to enhance regional security and improve the capabilities of Slovakia's armed forces. This support will also help keep Slovakia focused on the practical steps toward NATO, support its already-active participation in the full range of PfP exercises, and allow its armed forces to integrate more completely with NATO equipment and standards.

SLOVENIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

75

$318,180

75

$488,265

Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF)

108

$148,023

90

0

Service Academy

3

$222,711

0

0

Marshall Center

10

$151,360

17

$257,312

TOTAL

196

182

As a bridge between Central Europe and the Balkans, Slovenia has increasingly displayed the ability to positively influence Southeast European countries at differing stages of reform and integration. A Slovenia that is actively engaged in addressing regional security problems and a Slovenian military force that is stable, strong, well-administered, and closely tied to Euro-Atlantic institutions serves U.S. national security interests.

International training and education programs foster development of a strong bilateral military-to-military relationship and assist Slovenia in preparing its forces for the possibility of entry into NATO in a future round of enlargement. It also deepens Slovenian engagement in regional security arrangements, Partnership for Peace (PfP), the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC), and peacekeeping in the nearby area's zone of instability.

Slovenia's participation in IMET-sponsored senior professional military education, officer development courses and Non-Commissioned Officer training helps to develop the professional skills of senior and mid-level officers and NCOs and increases interoperability of the Slovene military with US and NATO forces. Further, expanded-IMET courses on civil-military relations, international defense resource management and military justice foster respect for the rule of law and human rights, and a greater understanding of the concept of civilian control of the military. Specialty training in courses such as Air Traffic Control, ranger training, peacekeeping, small arms training, logistics, and acquisition management, help develop critical skills necessary to enhance regional security and interoperability, while at the same time improving the internal self-defense capabilities of the Slovenian armed forces. Slovenia has also undertaken a robust English language training program with its Foreign Military Financing. Mobile training teams and the employment of a longer-term English language training coordinator have resulted in great success in this area, with a significant percentage of the Slovenian military speaking English.

Continued training support will help keep Slovenia focused on the practical steps for advancing its NATO candidacy, supporting its participation in the full range of PfP and "in the spirit of PfP" exercises, and allowing its armed forces to integrate more fully with NATO equipment and standards.

[end of file]

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