Department Seal Foreign Military Training and DoD
Engagement Activities of Interest, Volume I

Joint Report to Congress, March 1, 2000
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  III. DOS FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES

South Asia Region

BANGLADESH
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

78

$168,419

89

$191,341

Asia Pacific Center

10

$129,312

2

$26,759

TOTAL

88

$297,731

91

$218,100

Primary U.S. interests in Bangladesh are economic prosperity and democracy. Sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction, will maximize benefits for U.S. companies and decrease reliance on external assistance. Greater respect for human rights and the rule of law and the strengthening of democratic institutions are essential to ensuring political stability and are basic foundations of economic growth. Efficient distribution and utilization of U.S. humanitarian assistance for flood relief and rehabilitation effort will be vital for recovery of the rural economy. Global issues are also important U.S. interests in Bangladesh.

IMET funds are used to facilitate U.S. military-to-military professional contacts and assist in training exercises. Development of an apolitical, professional military contributes to political stability and allows for increased participation in peacekeeping exercises. Specifically, Bangladesh uses its IMET funding to send students to the Air Force and Navy Command and Staff Colleges, the Army and Air War Colleges and various officer training courses. These opportunities promote the U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Bangladeshi officer corps' familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. Bangladesh improves interoperability with U.S. forces through IMET-funded specialized English language training. Bangladeshi military personnel also take part in courses on military law, medical training, logistics and maintenance, all of which enhance their value as future peacekeeping participants.

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Bangladesh, the U.S. welcomed Bangladeshi participation in FY 1999 in the Asia Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Bangladesh. The U.S. proposes Bangladeshi participation in Asia Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

INDIA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

6

$95,755

11

$206,864

Asia Pacific Center

3

$45,621

6

$97,263

TOTAL

9

$141,376

17

$304,127

With almost a billion people, India is by far the largest country in South Asia and, after testing nuclear devices in May, a focus of global nonproliferation concern. The overwhelming U.S. priority there is to work with the international community to persuade India to adhere to global nonproliferation norms and stem a South Asian arms race. The Indo-U.S. commercial relationship has been growing steadily and, despite sanctions imposed in the wake of nuclear tests, the U.S. is India's leading trading partner and source of foreign investment. Although economic liberalization has been slow India is playing a growing role in the world's economic, military and environmental affairs.

IMET funds are used to facilitate U.S. military-to-military professional contacts and assist in training exercises. Development of an apolitical, professional military contributes to political stability and allows for increased participation in peacekeeping exercises. Specifically, India has used its IMET funding to send students to the Air Force and Navy Command and Staff Colleges, the Army and Air War Colleges and various officer training courses. These opportunities promote the U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Indian officer corps' familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. Indian military personnel also take part in courses on military law, medical training, logistics and maintenance, all of which enhance their value as future peacekeeping participants.

As a means of strengthening defense ties with India, the U.S. welcomed Indian participation in FY 1999 in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from India. The U.S. proposes Indian participation in Asia Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

MALDIVES
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

6

$29,038

6

$50,845

Asia Pacific Center

4

$53,523

2

$32,421

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

160

$215,000

0

0

TOTAL

170

$297,561

8

$83,266

The Maldives provides important access for U.S. vessels and allows aircraft transit rights in Maldivian airspace (permitting U.S. access to its airport during the Gulf War, for example). It is in the U.S. national security interest to maintain stability in this small island nation by strengthening its democratic institutions. The USG is also working with the Maldivian Government to coordinate policies in international organizations, especially on such issues of shared interest as global warming, drug trafficking, nonproliferation, and international crime and terrorism. Since the U.S. has no resident Mission in Maldives, the U.S. will continue to pursue national interests there through regular diplomatic exchanges managed by the U.S. Embassy in Colombo, through the IMET program and through Regional Democracy Fund programs.

Training included funds to facilitate U.S. military-to-military professional contacts and assist in training exercises. Development of an apolitical, professional military contributes to political stability and allows for increased participation in peacekeeping exercises. The Maldives uses its IMET funding to send students to the Naval Staff College, Officer Candidate School and various officer training courses. These opportunities promote the U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Bangladeshi officer corps' familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. The Maldives improves interoperability with U.S. forces through IMET-funded specialized English language training. Maldivian military personnel also take part in courses on maintenance and instructor training, all of which enhance their value as future peacekeeping participants. Also, the Maldives had four students attend the Asia Pacific Center in FY 1999, and has two students attending in FY 2000.

NEPAL
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

13

$57,957

12

$160,991

Asia Pacific Center

8

$107,046

4

$64,842

TOTAL

21

$165,003

16

$225,833

Nepal's progress in consolidating its young democratic institutions and achieving sustainable economic development supports the U.S. national interests of fostering democracy and prosperity around the globe, and promoting regional security. Nepal also presents opportunities for the pursuit of important U.S. global interests, including, preserving the environment, stabilizing population growth, providing humanitarian response, promoting market-oriented economic reform, strengthening international peacekeeping, combating international crime, and slowing the spread of infectious diseases.

Nepal uses its IMET funding to send students to various officer training courses. This facilitates U.S. military-to-military professional contacts and assist in training exercises. Development of an apolitical, professional military contributes to political stability and allows for increased participation in international peacekeeping. These opportunities promote the U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Nepalese officer corps' familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. Nepalese military personnel take part in courses on civil affairs, medical training, military police training, defense management and maintenance, all of which enhance their value as a future peacekeeping participants.

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Nepal, the U.S. welcomed Nepalese participation in FY 1999 in the Asia Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Nepal. The U.S. proposes Nepalese participation in Asia Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

PAKISTAN
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

Asia Pacific Center

3

$45,621

4

$64,842

Exchanges

4

$151,388

0

0

Service Academy

3

$222,711

0

0

TOTAL

10

$419,720

4

$64,842

The overwhelming priority of U.S. foreign policy in Pakistan is to work with the international community to persuade Pakistan to adhere to the global nuclear nonproliferation regime and stem a South Asian nuclear arms race. The U.S. is also promoting a resumption of a productive India-Pakistan dialogue to address the underlying issues leading to regional tensions. The basic long-range objective of the U.S. is to lay the foundation for a new, post-Cold War relationship. This will require that Pakistan strengthen its democratic institutions and implement market-oriented economic reforms. In revitalizing U.S.-Pakistani relations, the U.S. will focus on areas where Pakistan will have an important role to play in the 21st century. These include trade and investment, population stabilization, nuclear and missile nonproliferation, counter-narcotics, counter-terrorism, and cooperation in seeking an end to the civil war in Afghanistan and forging a broad-based democratic government there. Given the imposition of sanctions against Pakistan, U.S. tools for achieving these objectives are largely public and private diplomacy.

IMET funds cannot be disbursed to Pakistan at present under Section 508 sanctions, which prohibit military aid to any country that overthrows a democratically elected government. Should Pakistan return to democracy and IMET is restored, we would plan to use IMET funds to facilitate U.S. military-to-military professional contacts and assist in training exercises. Development of an apolitical, professional military contributes to political stability and allows for increased participation in peacekeeping exercises. In FY 1999 Pakistan sent students to the Air Force Academy, the Army War College, and the Army Command and General Staff College. These opportunities promote the U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Pakistani officer corps' familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. Also, Pakistan had three students attend the Asia Pacific Center in FY 1999, and has four students attending in FY 2000. These courses did not fall under the purview of Section 508 sanctions.

The Asia Pacific Center's executive courses were designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build relationships with their counterparts from Pakistan that hopefully will carry over to the post-military government era, when military to military relations can be resumed and expanded. The U.S. proposes Pakistani participation in Asia Pacific Center executive courses in FY 2000 as well.

SRI LANKA
  FY 1999 Actual FY 2000 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained Dollar Value Number of Students Trained Dollar Value

IMET

118

$82,919

113

$134,185

Asia Pacific Center

9

$115,193

5

$74,952

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

148

$280,000

0

0

TOTAL

275

$478,112

118

$209,137

Sri Lanka has a long tradition of vigorous democracy. It was the first country in the region to liberalize its economy, and has impressive social indicators. The primary U.S. national interests in Sri Lanka are strengthening democratic institutions, increases respect for human rights and enhancing Sri Lankan and U.S. economic prosperity. These goals not only reflect a U.S. humanitarian interest, but improved human rights performance would help facilitate an end to Sri Lanka's 15-year civil war, thereby reducing the threat of terrorism and improving regional stability. An end to the war would also boost the economy, increasing opportunities for U.S. business. The United States and Sri Lanka also share interests in environmental protection and the suppression of international terrorism.

Training included funds to facilitate U.S. military-to-military professional contacts and assist in training exercises. Development of an apolitical, professional military contributes to political stability and allows for increased participation in peacekeeping exercises. Specifically, Sri Lanka uses its IMET funding to send students to the Air Force and Navy Command and Staff Colleges and various officer training courses. These opportunities promote the U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Sri Lankan officer corps' familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. Sri Lanka improves interoperability with U.S. forces through IMET-funded specialized English language training. Sri Lankan military personnel take part in courses on civil affairs, defense management and maintenance, all of which enhance their value as a future peacekeeping participants. Also, Sri Lanka had nine students attend the Asia Pacific Center in FY 1999, and has five students attending in FY 2000.

[end of file]

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