Index

May 2000

 

 

 

 

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION CONTENT PAGE NUMBERS

1 Introduction 1-1


2 The OGIC Mission, Functions and Vision 2-1

3 Project Leader Roles and Responsibilities 3-1

  1. Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR)

Roles and Responsibilities 4-1

5 Technical Analyst Roles and Responsibilities 5-1

6 Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act 6-1

7 Program Objective Memorandum/Budget Process 7-1

8 OGI Monthly Production Report (MPAR) 8-1

9 Contract Types 9-1

10 The Task Order Process 10-1

11 Source Selection 11-1

12 Contractor Performance Information 12-1

12.A. Past Performance Questionnaire

12.B. Past Performance Database

13 Task Order Source Selection Justification 13-1

14 Statement of Work/Scope of Work (SOW) 14-1

15 Detailed Government Cost Estimate 15-1

16 Funding Document 16-1

17 Security Requirements/DD Form 254 17-1

18 Delivery Requirements 18-1

19 Liquidated Damages 19-1

20 Proprietary Data Handling 20-1

21 Source Packages 21-1

22 Quality Assurance Inspections 22-1

23 Contractor Qualifications 23-1

24 Briefings for Ops Intel Meeting 24-1

25 Items of Interest (IOI) 25-1

26 OGIC Policy Memorandums 26-1

# 001 Notification to PCM of Late 26-2

Contractor Deliveries and/or

Unacceptable Work

27 OGIC Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) 27-1

1. SOP for Using the Omnibus Past Performance

Database Available On-Line

2. SOP for OGIC Trip Reports 27-2

28 Acronyms 28-1

29 Definitions and Terminology 29-1

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 1 – INTRODUCTION

The Contract Production Acquisition Handbook is designed as a reference tool for Contract Production (OGIC) personnel. This tool encompasses several sections that all personnel within OGIC may benefit from. It by no means should solely be utilized by the Contracting Officer’s Representatives (CORs) within OGIC. This document will help you understand your roles and responsibilities as well as how important your contribution is to the team. Managers, CORs, Technical Analysts, and Project Leaders should not only understand their job but how the work they are responsible for assists OGIC in "guaranteeing the information edge".

This handbook contains acquisition process information and other items of interest. It is intended to be a living document – with materials being added or deleted as needs arise and as processes are improved. For this reason it is in loose-leaf binder format. If you believe a topic should be added, deleted or modified, please direct your comments to:

OGICM/Paulette Martin, (314) 263-4802 extension 156 or DSN 693-

Another valuable tool for OGIC personnel is the OGIC Navigation Page at http://164.214.2.59/gic/gicnav.html. Along with other pertinent OGIC information, our homepage provides the softcopy version of this handbook. Questions or comments pertaining to the OGIC Homepage should be directed to:

OGICM/Brad Slavik, (314) 263-8014 or DSN 693-

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 2 – THE OGIC MISSION, FUNCTIONS AND VISION

MISSION:

The Contract Production Division’s (OGIC) mission is:

Through commercial partnerships, establish the

capability and capacity to provide

timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial information.

FUNCTIONS:

OGIC’s functions are:

The Contract Production Division is the contracting administrative arm of the Geospatial Information and Services Office (OGI) of the Imagery and Geospatial Operations Directorate (DO) within the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The DO mission is to acquire key source material (National Technical Means (NTM) imagery, commercial imagery, national airbreather, bathymetric data, gravity data, ground photography, government and commercially produced geospatial information) and to acquire or produce value-added information in NIMA’s core mission areas to meet customer needs.

Any technical questions a contractor or interested future contractor may have about a current product under contract can get assistance within OGIC from the appropriate Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR). OGIC is located in the Bethesda, Maryland and St. Louis, Missouri facilities of NIMA.

VISION:

"The Contract Production Division (OGIC) provides a unique service for the National Imagery and Mapping Agency. Through the actions of our office, the discrete and global requirements of our many Intelligence and Geospatial customers are satisfied. This "business" of contract production will grow steadily in future years to the point where contracting becomes the first choice in terms of production methods. Our influence in determining NIMA’s success will expand dramatically over time as customer requirements for Geospatial and Intelligence Information will be for greater precision and shorter production timelines. To advance the NIMA mission we encumber a complex but critical position; one which requires absolute loyalty to NIMA and its customers while at the same time building a partnership with industry. Our challenge is to build expert capability, on contract, to deliver the quality products required by our customers and the necessary numbers of them, all within a limited budget. Your effort is key to meeting this challenge. We must work together to shape the future of Geospatial and Intelligence Information production. We owe our best effort to our customers. We must "guarantee" them, the information edge."

 

PAUL R. WEISE

Associate Director

Contract Production Division

 

ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS:

Figure 2-1 – OGIC Organizational Structure at Phase 1 (1 April 2000)

Figure 2-2 – OGIC Organizational Structure to Branch Level

Figure 2-3 – OGIC Organizational Structure identifying Individuals and Major

Responsibilities

Figure 2-4 – OGI Organizational Structure at Phase 2 (1 October 2000)

Point of Contact:

Name

Jim Sippel

Organization

OGIC

Phone Number

(301) 227-2734

 

Figure 2-1

 

Figure 2-2

Figure 2-3

Figure 2-4

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 3 – PROJECT LEADER ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The key responsibilities of the Project Leaders in OGIC include those that are listed as follows:

 

 

 

Ready Reference Chart – OGIC Project Leader Functional Responsibilities

New Services

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Imagery Analysis

BET/STL

Brad Hayek

(301) 227-2051

John Simon

(314) 263-4802 x122

NITF Compliance

BET/STL

Jim Clawson

(314) 263-4802 x165

Quality Review Contracts

BET/STL

All

(301) 227-2051

All

(314) 263-4802

SRTM

BET/STL

Jim Slater

(301) 227-2051

Barry Heady

(314) 263-4802 x133

Contract Management

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Budget Analysis

BET/STL

Gail Harding/

Nora Nakagama

(301) 227-2051

   

Congressional Inquiries

BET/STL

OGICM

(301) 227-2051

OGICM

(314) 263-4802

Equipment Account-bility

BET/STL

TBD

(301) 227-2051

Brad Slavik

(314) 263-8014

ISSO (Laptop)

BET/STL

TBD

(301) 227-2051

Brad Slavik

(314) 263-8014

Program Develop-ment

BET/STL

OGICM

(301) 227-2051

OGICM

(314) 263-4802

Contract Methodology

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

NPP

BET/STL

   

John Simon

(314) 263-4802 x122

Omnibus

BET/STL

Brad Hayek

(301) 227-2051

John Simon

(314) 263-4802 x122

Past Performance Database

BET/STL

Brad Hayek/Dave Chen

(301) 227-2051

John Simon

(314) 263-4802 x122

Tailored Projects

BET/STL

OGICM

(301) 227-2051

OGICM

(314) 263-4802

 

Technical Issues

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Commercial/Alternate Source

BET/STL

Karl Tammaro

(301) 227-2051

Jim Clawson/

John Simon

(314) 263-4802 x165/x122

EIS

BET/STL

Karl Tammaro

(301) 227-2051

   

NTM Math Model Change

BET/STL

   

Jim Clawson

(314) 263-4802 x165

Training

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

DAWIA

BET/STL

John Schmitt

(301) 227-2051

   

Discretion-ary Training

BET/STL

John Schmitt

(301) 227-2051

   

NIMC

BET/STL

John Schmitt

(301) 227-2051

   

Regional Team Support

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Americas

OGIRA

       

Asia/

Oceania

OGIRO

       

Eurasia

OGIRE

       

Middle East/Africa

OGIRM

       

Trans-regional

OGIRT

       

Existing Processes

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

ADRG

STL

   

Greg Johnson

(314) 263-4802 x131

Airfields

STL

   

Paul McCoy

(314) 263-8009

AT200

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-480 x153

CIB

BET/STL

Joe Huseman

(301) 227-2051

   

City Graphics

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

Combat

BET

Steve Haag

(301) 227-2051

   

DFAD

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

DNC

BET

Joe Miller

(301) 227-2051

   

DPPDB

STL

   

Jim Clawson

(314) 263-4802 x165

DTED

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

FFD

BET/STL

Christine Caplan

(301) 227-2051

Deborah Sterling

(314) 263-4325

FLIP

STL

   

Bob Montgomery

(314) 263-4802 x147

G&G Applications

BET/STL

Jim Slater

(301) 227-2051

   

Geonames Servicing

BET/STL

All

(301) 227-2051

All

(314) 263-4802

Geoposition-ing

BET/STL

   

Jim Clawson

(314) 263-4802 x165

GNC

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

ITD

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

JNC

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

JOG-A (A6)

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

JOG-A (B3)

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

JOG-A (B4)

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

JOG-A (D1)

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

JOG-A (E1)

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

JOG-A (K1)

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

JOG-A (P3)

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

JOG-A (P4)

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

JOG-A (P9)

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

Landcover

BET

Karl Tammaro

(301) 227-2051

   

ONC

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

PM/S Migration

BET/STL

Joe Edelen

(301) 227-2051

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

SCO

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

SCO

STL

   

Dale Martinez

(314) 263-4802 x167

SCO

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

THAILAND DTED2

STL

   

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x150

THAILAND TLM

BET/STL

John Williams

(301) 227-2051

   

TLM 1:50

BET/STL

Jim Roguski

(301) 227-2051

Larry Henderson/

Jerry Crump

(314) 263-4802 x153 or x150

TLM 1:100

BET/STL

   

Jerry Crump/

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x150 or x153

TOD

BET

Steve Haag

(301) 227-2051

   

TPC

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

UVMAP

STL

   

Greg Johnson

(314) 263-4802 x131

VJOG

STL

   

Larry Henderson

(314) 263-4802 x153

Existing Processes (Continued)

Functional Area

Site

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

VMAP0

STL

   

Greg Johnson

(314) 263-4802 x131

VMAP1

STL

   

Greg Johnson

(314) 263-4802 x131

 

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 4 – CONTRACTING OFFICER’S REPRESENTATIVE (COR)

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Contracting Officers (CO) are personnel within the Procurement and Contracts Office (PC), with the specific written authority to enter into, administer, or terminate contracts and make related determinations and findings. Contracting Officers ensure that all requirements of law, executive orders, regulation, and other applicable procedures, including clearances and approvals, have been met and sufficient funds are available for obligation. They ensure that contractors receive impartial, fair, and equitable treatment. They also evaluate proposals and offers to ensure potential contractors are responsive and responsible.

A Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) is the primary liaison between the contractor and the Contracting Officer. Within OGIC, CORs serve as the technical liaison between commercial vendors and the Procurement and Contracts Office. CORs have no authority other than that which has been delegated to them in writing by the Contracting Officer.

When an acquisition requires a COR, the organizational supervisor notifies the Contracting Officer, in writing, of the employee being nominated for the position.

COR nominees must be an employee of the U.S. Government, have completed a DOD or other federal agency COR course or update within the last five years, and have a statement from the General Counsel that there is no legal objection to their appointment. Once the Contracting Officer determines the COR is adequate for the effort, the CO must issue an appointment letter to both the COR and the contractor identifying the effort and the COR’s duties, responsibilities, and limits of authority. Appointment is effective for the life of the contract/task order unless termination actions are taken. The CO may terminate the appointment of the COR at any time by written notification to the COR and the contractor.

The Procurement and Contracts Policy, Technology, and Legislated Programs Division (PCP) maintains the NIMA Consolidated COR List which is posted on the PC internal home page and furnished to the Office of General Counsel (GC) and Directors on a quarterly basis or as requested. Employees who become CORs and thus are included on this Listing need to submit the required financial disclosure information on an OGE Form 450, Confidential Financial Disclosure Report, to GC each year.

When a COR leaves NIMA, the organizational supervisor notifies PC so the name can be removed from the NIMA Consolidated COR List.

A COR possesses the ability to identify and mitigate resource, equipment, and process conflicts affecting the ability to achieve a planned program. They possess the ability to communicate orally and in writing, and work with employees at all levels within NIMA. CORs have excellent communication and negotiation skills, and possess initiative and flexibility. They travel to contractor sites and must maintain flexibility, adaptability, and a positive attitude toward government/commercial vendor partnering relationships.

The key responsibilities of the CORs in OGIC include those that are listed as follows:

Ready Reference Chart – OCIG COR Functional Responsibilities

STRATEGIC FOUNDATION DEPARTMENT (OGICF):

Functional Area

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Strategic Foundation Department Chief

Ken Hutchison

(301) 227-2051

   

Strategic Foundation Branch Chiefs

Jill Kieswetter

(301) 227-2051

Ted Isringhaus

(314) 263-4802 ext. 145

FFD

Glenn Guempel

(301) 227-5490

Dan Couden

(314) 263-8015

FFD

Tom Hendrickson

(301) 227-5490

Jay Gardner

(314) 263-8014

FFD

Damon King

(301) 227- 5490

Chuck Squires

(314) 263-8015

FFD

Larry McDurfee

(301) 227-5490

   

FFD

Martha Womack

(301) 227-5490

   

CIB

Andrew King

(301) 227-5490

Mark Whitney

(314) 263-8015

CIB

Jean Saraceni

(301) 227-2051

Susan Vieth

(314) 263-8014

DPPDB

   

Dave Ninneman

(314) 263-8015

Geoposition-ing

   

Ray Lauer

(314) 262-8015

SAFETY OF NAVIGATION DEPARTMENT (OGICN):

Function Area

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Safety of Navigation Department Chief

   

Pat Satterfield

(314) 263-4508 ext. 169

Safety of Navigation Branch Chiefs

Craig White

(301) 227-5490

Paul Palazzolo

(314) 263-8015

DNC

John Lindner

(301) 227-5490

   

DNC

John Means

(301) 227-5490

   

DNC

Dave Musselman

(301) 227-5490

   

DNC

Rodney Vanderpol

(301) 227-5490

   

DNC

Jeff Merkle

(301) 227-5490

   

DNC

Matt Foley

(301) 227-5490

   

FLIP

   

Cindy Caples

(314) 263-8014

TOD

Andrew Foehrkolb

(301) 227-5490

   

TOD

Chris Hathaway

(301) 227-5490

   

Airfields

   

Jeff Weymouth

(314) 263-4325

Airfields

   

Denise Vermeulen

(314) 263-8015

Airfields

   

Mark Wayne

(314) 263-8015

MISSION READINESS DEPARTMENT (OGICR):

Functional Area

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

Mission Readiness Department Chief

   

Les Kemp

(314) 263-4802 ext. 140

Mission Readiness Branch Chiefs

Karen Middleton

(301) 227-5490

Lew Rosenbaum

(314) 263-8014

ADRG

   

John Gardiner

(314) 263-4895

AT200

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

AT200

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

AT200

   

Don Porter

(314) 263-8015

City Graphics

   

TBD

 

DFAD

   

John Gardiner

(314) 263-4895

GNC

   

TBD

 

ITD

   

TBD

 

JNC

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

JNC

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

JNC

   

Don Porter

(314) 263-8015

JOG-A (A6, B3, B4, D1, E1, K1, P3, P4, P9)

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

JOG-A (A6, B3, B4, D1, E1, K1, P3, P4, P9)

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

JOG-A (A6, B3, B4, D1, E1, K1, P3, P4, P9)

   

Don Porter

(314) 262-8015

ONC

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

MISSION READINESS DEPARTMENT (OGICR) (Continued):

Functional Area

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

ONC

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

SCO

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

Thailand

Wayne Nelson

(301) 227-

   

Thailand DTED2

   

Chris Nixon

(314) 263-8015

Thailand DTED2

   

Clint McBride

(314) 263-8014

Thailand TLM

Tony Fugate

(301) 227-5490

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

Thailand TLM

Ken Foley

(301) 227-5490

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

Thailand TLM

Carol Quaintance

(301) 227-5490

Don Porter

(314) 263-8015

Thailand TLM

Felicia Thompson

(301) 227-5490

   

Thailand TLM

Marvin Loretz

(301) 227-5490

   

Thailand TLM

Von Riggs

(301) 227-5490

   

TLM 1:50

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

TLM 1:50

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

TLM 1:50

   

Don Porter

(314) 263-8015

TLM 1:100

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

TLM 1:100

   

Brian Pederson

(314) 263-8014

TLM 1:100

   

Don Porter

(314) 263-8015

TPC

   

Ron Muse

(314) 263-8014

TPC

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

TPC

   

Don Porter

(314) 263-8015

UVMAP1

   

Patrice Fenner

(314) 263-4325

MISSION READINESS DEPARTMENT (OGICR) (Continued):

Functional Area

POC Bethesda

Phone Number

POC

St. Louis

Phone Number

VJOG

   

Brian Pedersen

(314) 263-8014

VMAP0

   

Scott Schuchardt

(314) 263-4802 x144

VMAP1

Andy Karl

(301) 227-5490

George Hoff

(314) 263-4325

VMAP1

Brad Lucas

(301) 227-5490

Scott Schuchardt

(314) 263-4802 x144

VMAP1

   

Patrice Fenner

(314) 263-4325

 

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 5 – TECHNICAL ANALYST ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The Technical Analyst serves as the eyes for the Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR). This individual is the technical expert. Some of the specific duties of a Technical Analyst are:

Above all, the OGIC Technical Analyst is an ambassador of the Agency. Professionalism is key.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St.Louis

 

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 6 – DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE

IMPROVEMENT ACT (DAWIA)

Congress adopted the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) in 1990. The intent is to improve DOD acquisition by improving the quality of the Acquisition Workforce. DAWIA requires the Secretary of Defense to establish policies and procedures for the effective management (including accession, education, training, and career development) of DOD professionals in acquisition positions. The two areas of concentration in managing the acquisition workforce are position management and career development.

DOD implemented DAWIA by establishing a Career Development Program for acquisition personnel documented by the guidance and policy in DOD 5000.52 and DOD 5000.52M. These regulations apply to military and civilian personnel occupying acquisition positions. DAWIA is the governing authority for the NIMA acquisition workforce.

Certification is the procedure through which a DOD Component determines that the employee meets the professional standards (education, training, and experience) established for a career level (I, II, or III) in any of the eleven (11) acquisition career fields as follows:

Contracting

Purchasing

Program Management

Communication/Computer Systems Acquisition

Property Management

Systems Planning, R&D, and Engineering

Test and Evaluation

Manufacturing, Production and Quality Assurance

Acquisition Logistics

Financial Management (Acquisition related)

Auditing

The majority of OGIC personnel have been designated to be in acquisition positions identified in the DAWIA occupational specialty of "Manufacturing, Production and Quality Assurance". Figure 6-1 is the Certification Standards Checklist for the "Manufacturing, Production and Quality Assurance" occupational specialty.

The typical grade associated with each of the levels is as follows:

DAWIA Certification Level Typical Grades Bands

I GS05-GS08 Band I – II

II GS09-GS12 Band II – III

III GS13 and above Band IV and above

Acquisition Certification Standards are described in the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Catalog that is available on the OGIC Navigation Page at "Government Sites" – "Defense Acquisition University (DAWIA Training)". The specific website for the Defense Acquisition University’s Online Catalog is at www.acq.osd.mil/dau/toc.html.

NIMA is among the components authorized to certify employees against the DAWIA standards. Normally, employees should meet the appropriate level before being assigned to an acquisition position at that level. If not, persons assigned to positions that are identified as DAWIA positions for more than 120 days must become qualified within 18 months of the assignment. NIMA’s Component Acquisition Executive (CAE) designates DAWIA positions and is the DAWIA certifying official. Requests for new acquisition positions are submitted in December of each year and are adjudicated the following January at the Acquisition Career Program Board (ACPB) within NIMA. The NIMA CAE designates and publishes (internally) a list of all military and civilian acquisition positions, critical acquisition positions, and certification standards required for each acquisition position at least annually, as of the end of the fiscal year.

For an individual designated in an acquisition position within NIMA, the following certification process is to be followed:

  1. The employee documents the requirement or desire for DAWIA certification in his/her Individual Development Program Plan (IDPP).
  2. The employee completes designated training.
  3. The employee completes Part A and B of NIMA Form 4245-2, Acquisition Personnel Certification, which is available on the NIMA Intranet.
  4. The employee writes a letter detailing the achievement of mandatory standards and listing all mandatory training, educational degrees, semester hours of business-related courses, and experience. The employee must attach supporting documentation, such as training completion certifications, any valid training waivers, college transcripts, requests and rationale for waivers, and equivalency test certifications. The employee describes mandatory experience including enough of a description of duties to show how the experience is acquisition related. See sample Certification Application provided as Figure 6-2.
  5. The employee’s supervisor reviews and endorses the application.
  6. Upon supervisor’s approval, the employee submits the application for DAWIA certification to the NIMA Acquisition Career Program Manager (ACPM) in the NIMA Acquisition Center (NAC) (see below for a further description of the NAC).
  7. The ACPM will review all certifications. The ACPM has the authority to approve or disapprove applications for Level I or Level II. For those requesting certification at Level III, the ACPM will review and forward those certification packages to the Component Acquisition Executive (CAE) for final approval.
  8. The CAE issues the certification.

The Defense Acquisition University offers an Acquisition Workforce Certification Program. The DAU homepage has the DAU Catalog (career field and course information), pre-course materials and related publications. Supervisors of those requiring mandatory training are responsible for ensuring that DAWIA training and any associated travel are properly requested and authorized.

DOD has mandated an 80 hour per two year continuing education/training requirement for those in the DAWIA acquisition workforce once certified.

A DAWIA database is maintained by OGICM/John Schmitt representing all OGIC employees. The database shows individual information such as what DAWIA courses have been completed, and what required DAWIA courses are still needed. It identifies those individuals in a critical acquisition position and what certification level is required for an individual’s position.

The NIMA Acquisition Center (NAC) – The NAC was established in January 1998 with a vision to define, facilitate and provide the leadership and infrastructure for a sound, repeatable and value-added acquisition process within NIMA. The area of responsibility of the NAC for ensuring professional development of the NIMA acquisition workforce includes managing and administering NIMA’s Acquisition Career Program Board (ACPB) and Acquisition Career Development Program (ACDP) for both civilian and military acquisition personnel. It manages NIMA’s DAWIA program, administrating all NIMA acquisition training registered through the Defense Acquisition University and through the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (USD(AT&L)) Policy on Continuous Learning for the Defense Acquisition Workforce, and approval authority for career field certification under DAWIA.

Points of Contact:

Name

Paulette Martin

John Schmitt

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 156

(301) 227-2051

 

 

Manufacturing, Production and Quality Assurance

Level I

Years of Experience Education Training

    1. One of acquisition in engineering, (M) None (M) ACQ 101

manufacturing, production or quality (M) PQM 101

assurance

    1. Four weeks (cumulative) rotational

assignments at a contractor and/or

Government industrial facility to

include experience in quality,

manufacturing, engineering and contracting

Level II

Years of Experience Education Training

(M) Two of acquisition in engineering, (D) BS/BA in engineering, (M) ACQ 201

manufacturing, production or quality chemistry, physical science (M) PQM 201

assurance mathematics, statistics,

    1. Four weeks (cumulative) rotational manufacturing or production

assignments at a contractor and/or management , industrial technology

Government industrial facility to or management, quality assurance

include experience in quality, or related field

manufacturing, engineering and (D) Masters in business, production

contracting management, engineering, or

(if not completed in Level I) related field

    1. Two additional years of acquisition in

Manufacturing, production or quality

assurance

Level III

Years of Experience Education Training

    1. Four of acquisition in engineering, (D) Same as Level II (M) PQM 301

Manufacturing, production or (D) One advanced

Quality assurance seminar in current

    1. Four more in manufacturing, acquisition manage-

Production or quality assurance ment issues

*(M) means mandatory

*(D) means desired

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 6-1

Figure 6-2

Sample DAWIA Certification Application

NOTE: The highlighted areas are areas that you need to fill in. You do not have to highlight them on your package.

 

From: (Your Name, Your Office Phone Number, Your Mail Stop)

Subject: Application for Acquisition Career Management Certification in the (whatever career field for which you are applying) Career Field.

To: NIMA ACPB, c/o Eleanor Mueller, PCN Mail Stop P-01

  1. I, Your Name, request level (whatever level you are requesting) certification in the (your career field) career field. I currently hold no Acquisition certifications OR I currently hold the following Acquisition certifications – Please list them. Listed below are the requirements I have completed for certification.
  2. Education:
  1. Degree:
  2. BA, History, Loyola College, 1972

     

  3. Business-Related courses

Please list your Business Related Courses and

Attach copy of transcript(s) with business courses highlighted

Course Title Institution Credit Hrs

Introduction to

National Income

Analysis Loyola College 4

 

  1. DAWIA Training: Attach copy of each certificate
  2. Course Offering Date

    Title Institution Completed

    Fundamentals of Systems

    Acquisition Management

    (ACQ 101) AFIT 11/6/97

    Intermediate Systems

    Acquisition (ACQ 201) DSMC 5/22/98

     

  3. Experience Specifically discuss your acquisition related experience

 

From - To Title/Series/Grade Office/Location

5/10/98 Cartographer

Present GS-1370-13 NIMA/RPA

Because the Procurement office handles its own requirements, every statement below about DAWIA is made in the context of all of NIMA except Procurement. As the NIMA DAWIA Quota Manager, I keep track of all certification plans and training requirements for all NIMA Acquisition Personnel. I advise every Acquisition employee on course requirements, prerequisites, and other necessities for their fields of acquisition certification. I frequently field questions from employees and supervisors about the DAWIA program. I review the DAU scheduling allotments, attempting to ensure equitable distribution among all offices of NIMA. I review every request for DAWIA certification, make my recommendations, before passing them up to my first line supervisor. I am responsible for ensuring the accuracy of the financial quarterly report sent to the DOD DACM.

I am also the quality control officer for the entire NIMA DAWIA database.

 

 

7/97 - 5/10/98 ST/S DAWIA Program Manager NIMA/SEO

GS-1370-13

 

Responsible for ensuring that all non Procurement training slots allocated to NIMA were filled by employees who required Acquisition training. I coordinated with the DOD DACM (Director of Acquisition Career Management) office to get additional acquisition training slots allocated to NIMA employees for FY98. I was responsible for populating and maintaining the non Procurement portion of the NIMA DAWIA database which contains the names of all personnel in NIMA who have taken DAWIA courses. I kept track of which courses each person had taken and for which career fields he or she had been, or should be, certified. I reviewed each packet requesting DAWIA certification to determine if the individual had met all qualifications. If he or she had met all the requirements, I passed the packet on to Gene Smalling for official signature. If a person was lacking any of the requirements, I returned the packet to the requestor with an explanation for the rejection. I worked closely with each office in ST/S to ensure an equitable distribution of Acquisition Workforce training slots. I was responsible for maintaining the ST/S file on Defense Acquisition Workforce information. I was the person every non-Procurement NIMA employee came to if they had a DAWIA question.

 

2/96 - 9/96 Quality Assurance Engineer DMA/ATEM

GS-1370-13

 

I was a member of the Consolidated Maintenance Services (CMS) contract Process Engineering Team, matrixed from ATEM. I conducted audits and wrote technical reports against CMS practices in relation to the Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM). I helped coordinate development of standards and procedures; responsible for monitoring adherence to process/quality standards; Activity areas included: Configuration Management, Customer Support Organizations (CSOs), Software Engineering, Maintenance Engineering & Test (ME&T), Program Office, Program Support, and Integrated Development and Maintenance Environment (IDME).

 

 

 

The information provided herein is true and correct.

 

SIGN Your Name, current date

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 6-2

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 7 – PROGRAM OBJECTIVE MEMORANDUM (POM)/

BUDGET PROCESS

The Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System (PPBS) is the major process used by the Secretary of Defense to manage DOD resource allocation. It provides a framework within which to structure resource management. It allows decision-makers to link resource inputs with the outputs required by national policy, and to make rational choices among alternatives to minimize military risk given constrained resources. The PPBS is a three-phase process that has been evolving since its inception in 1962. Planning addresses the capabilities required for carrying out the U.S. national security strategy and the resources available for defense. Programming translates the results of DOD planning into a national, six-year defense program within available resources. Budgeting converts the program into the Congressional appropriation structure, focusing on "getting the numbers right", and balancing the books to meet Topline guidance from the President and Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The Defense Planning Guidance (DPG) is the Secretary of Defense’s policy and fiscal guidance upon which the military services and defense agencies base their programs and budgets in the PPBS.

The Program Objective Memorandum (POM) is a formal recommendation from a service or defense agency to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) describing that service or agency’s resources requirements over a six-year period. Once the program is approved through a Program Decision Memorandum (PDM), the requestor prices it out and submits a formal budget request in the form of a Best Estimate Submission (BES).

Budget Resolution is the first phase of the congressional budget process and sets overall spending limits on major categories of outlays.

Authorization determines which programs and activities requested by the President will be authorized in legislation passed by both houses of Congress. It is common for dollar limits to be set on many of the activities.

Appropriation determines how much each authorized program is to receive in the final approved budget.

Budget Authority allows federal departments and agencies to incur obligations against congressional appropriations signed into law by the President. Once contracts are signed for the delivery of goods and services, an outlay is created.

Budget Execution is the liquidation of the budget authority contained in appropriations and federal funds are outlayed to pay for the operations of authorized federal activities.

NIMA has a budget relationship with six key Committees: House Permanent Select on Intelligence (HPSCI); Senate Select on Intelligence (SSCI); House Armed Services (HASC); Senate Armed Services (SASC); House Appropriations (HAC); and Senate Appropriations (SAC).

NIMA’s future is dependent on how well we plan, program, budget, and justify needs for its operations each year. Miscalculation or indifference to any one of these key functions can and generally will lead to significant loss of resources in the budget arena.

At certain points in NIMA’s budget cycle, your input can be crucial to OGIC (e.g., supplemental plus-ups by Congress; last minute add-ons by the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) or Secretary of Defense (SecDef) for President’s budget; last minute cuts by OMB for President’s budget). NIMA frequently gets only 24-48 hours to provide recommendations to the DCI or SecDef for plus-ups or cuts. Having an awareness of the budget cycle and potential for actions can mean more dollars or people for our mission. We must all keep in mind that accurate information and timely response often wins the day. We need to be prepared and ready to answer these two questions: (1) How could we spend additional money? (2) How would we cut or reduce lowest priority activities?

Point of Contact:

Name

Gail Harding

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(301) 227-2051

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 8 – OGI MONTHLY PRODUCTION REVIEW (MPAR)

Program accountability, management and monthly performance assessment is accomplished through the Monthly Production Review (MPAR) reporting process. The MPAR is an internal OGI meeting in which both informational and decision briefings are presented. The Pre-MPAR is normally held on the third Monday of each month in which the OGIC Project Leaders brief their assigned program initiatives to OGIC management. The actual MPAR is held on the third Tuesday of each month for OGI management. Briefings and the report are provided based on the initiative and command. They are on the production summary for each program and include product, site/process, rates, OGI workyears, OGID workyears, and OGIC dollars and other items of interest and development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Gail Harding

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(301) 227-2051

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 9 – CONTRACT TYPES

Selecting the contract type is generally a matter for negotiation and requires the exercise of sound judgment. The objective is to negotiate a contract type and price (or estimated cost and fee) that will result in reasonable contractor risk and provide the contractor with the greatest incentive for efficient and economical performance.

A wide selection of contract types is available to the Government and contractors in order to provide needed flexibility in acquiring the large variety and volume of supplies and services required by agencies. The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) groups contract types into two broad categories: fixed-price contracts and cost-reimbursement contracts. The specific contract types range from firm-fixed-price, in which the contractor has full responsibility for the performance costs and resulting profit (or loss), to cost-plus-fixed-fee, in which the contractor has minimal responsibility for the performance costs and the negotiated fee (profit) is fixed. Contract types vary according to:

The following are definitions for types of contracts as defined in the FAR and are a representation of those commonly utilized for OGIC’s contracts:

A Firm-Fixed-Price contract, which best utilizes the basic profit motive of business enterprise, shall be used when the risk involved is minimal or can be predicted with an acceptable degree of certainty. This contract type provides for a price that is not subject to any adjustment on the basis of the contractor’s cost experience in performing the contract and places upon the contractor maximum risk and full responsibility for all costs and resulting profit or loss. It provides maximum incentives for the contractor to control costs and perform effectively and imposes a minimum administrative burden upon the contracting parties.

An Indefinite-Delivery contract may provide for any appropriate cost or pricing arrangement. There are three types of indefinite-delivery contracts: definite-quantity contracts, requirements contracts, and indefinite-quantity contracts. The appropriate type of indefinite-delivery contract may be used to acquire supplies and/or services when the exact times and/or exact quantities of future deliveries are not known at the time of contract award. Requirements contracts and indefinite-quantity contracts are also known as delivery order contracts or task order contracts, which permit flexibility in both quantities and delivery scheduling and ordering of supplies or services after requirements materialize.

An Indefinite-Quantity contract provides for an indefinite quantity, within stated limits, of supplies or services to be furnished during a fixed period, in which deliveries or performance are scheduled by placing orders with the contractor. Quantity limits may be expressed in terms of numbers of units or as dollar values. An indefinite-quantity contract may be used when the Government cannot predetermine, above a specified minimum, the precise quantities of supplies or services that will be required during the contract period, and it is inadvisable for the Government to commit itself for more than a minimum quantity. An indefinite-quantity contract should be used only when a recurring need is anticipated. The Contracting Officer shall, to the maximum extent practicable, give preference to making multiple awards of indefinite-quantity contracts under a single solicitation for the same or similar supplies or services to two or more sources.

A Task Order contract means a contract for services that does not procure or specify a firm quantity of services (other than a minimum or maximum quantity) and that provides for the issuance of orders for the performance of tasks during the period of the contract. For orders issued under multiple task order contracts, each awardee must be provided a fair opportunity to be considered for each order in excess of $2,500. The Contracting Officer, in making decisions on the award of any individual task order, should consider factors such as – past performance on earlier tasks under the multiple award contract, quality of deliverables, cost control, and price.

NOTE: The Omnibus contracts were awarded as Indefinite-Delivery/Indefinite-Quantity (IDIQ) contracts using firm-fixed-price task orders. For each contract awarded, there is a guaranteed $3,000 minimum.

A Time-and-Materials contract provides for acquiring supplies or services on the basis of (1) Direct labor hours at specified fixed hourly rates that include wages, overhead, general and administrative expenses, and profits; and (2) Materials at cost, including, if appropriate, material handling costs as part of material costs. It may be used only when it is not possible at the time of placing the contract to estimate accurately the extent or duration of the work or to anticipate costs with any reasonable degree of confidence.

A Labor-Hour contract is a variation of the time-and-materials contract, differing only in that materials are not supplied by the contractor.

A Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) is a written instrument of understanding, negotiated between an agency, contracting activity, or contracting office and a contractor. It may be used to expedite contracting for uncertain requirements for supplies or services when specific items, quantities, and prices are not known at the time the agreement is executed, but a substantial number of requirements for the type of supplies or services covered by the agreement are anticipated to be purchased from the contractor.

A NEW OGIC INITIATIVE: OGIC is currently working with PCM on a NIMA Production Prototype (NPP) Contract/Agreement to be awarded in July 2000. It will augment the current Omnibus contract; and is not intended to replace the Omnibus, a Firm-Fixed-Price contract. It is being developed to allow for pricing structures which may not be amenable to firm-fixed pricing. Offerors interested in this endeavor have the option to propose any legal contractual vehicle. Examples include a contract subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation and subordinate agency (DOD/NIMA) supplements, a flexible cooperative agreement subject to the DOD Grants and Agreement Regulation, or an other transaction for prototype or research and development (R&D). The only stipulation is that all offers proposing other than a DOD FAR-covered contract must document the benefit to NIMA in awarding an alternative business agreement.

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Paulette Martin

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 156

 

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 10 – THE TASK ORDER PROCESS

Under the Omnibus contracts:

On 31 December 1998, NIMA awarded fifteen (15) contracts under its Omnibus Geospatial Information and Imagery Intelligence Solicitation program. The companies offering proposals were evaluated on their technical capabilities. The contract awards range from a guaranteed $3,000 each, up to a non-guaranteed maximum total value of $20 million to $600 million over a five-year period. The contracts cover production services that fall into three broad areas: surveying, mapping and charting, and imagery intelligence and photogrammetric services. This solicitation followed NIMA’s strategy of consolidating contracts through the use of prime contractors and teaming arrangements. The program allows NIMA to be more responsive in meeting the changing customer requirements of its military and civilian government customers. It is the culmination of a carefully planned effort between government and industry building long-term commercial partnerships and expanding technology transfer.

Task Order Contents:

Purchase request packages must be completed and fully approved in sufficient time in order for the servicing contract division (PCM) to start the procurement process. Task order purchase request packages are to be completed by the Project Leader and comprised of the following: 1) An Air Force Form 9 (funding document), 2) a Government Estimate, 3) a Statement of Work with specific instructions if required, and 4) a Source Selection Justification.

  1. AF Form 9 Processing (see Section 16 of this Handbook)

The following process must be followed:

    1. An AF 9 will be generated by the Project Leader and approved by their respective Branch Chief as the Approving Official.
    2. A copy of the AF 9 will be forwarded to OGICM/Gail Harding or Nora Nakagama for incorporation into a funding database (for OGIC St. Louis, a faxed copy to Gail/Nora is acceptable).
    3. Gail/Nora will forward the AF 9 to CFO-$E for processing and authorization.
    4. For OGIC St. Louis AF 9s, the Project Leader will send the original to CFO-$E who will attach the copy from Gail/Nora. CFO-$E will forward the funding document to the servicing contracting activity (PCM). For IGIC Bethesda AF 9s, Gail/Nora will send the original directly to the supporting Contracting Officer in PCM.
  1. Government Estimate (see Section 15 of this Handbook)

A government estimate utilizing hourly rates defined in the respective vendor contract and a list of other indirect costs will be provided to OGICM by the Project Leader. OGICM will subsequently forward this to PCM after review. The Government Estimate will contain the following information:

    1. Summary of the required skills (identified in Section B of the vendor contract) to complete the task.
    2. Total hours by production phase for each skill identified.
    3. Total cost by skill (total hours x hourly rates identified by skill in Section B of the contract).
    4. Other indirect costs will be listed as well. These include, if applicable, profit, incentives, travel, equipment, and materials.
  1. SOW and Specific Instructions (see Section 14 of this Handbook)
  2. A SOW and associated specific instructions will be prepared by the Project Leader. These documents will be forwarded to OGICM for review and comment. Upon acceptance, OGICM will forward to PCM.

  3. Source Selection Justification (see Section 11 of this Handbook)

After consultation with the Project Leaders and the CORs, a draft justification will be prepared by OGICM and submitted to PCM for comment. The justification once accepted will be signed by OGICM/Brad Hayek in Bethesda or John Simon in St. Louis and forwarded to PCM.

Modification to an existing Task Order:

All contract modifications for additional work to an existing task order must have an accompanying addendum that references the original justification memorandum. A modification for additional work is not encouraged but may be appropriate for circumstances where the new requirement falls within the same project area, is under the identical scope of work, and is small in number relative to the original requirement.

The addendum shall identify –

    1. Quantity and description of additional work.
    2. Reference to the original justification, stating that the selection rationale under Section H-4, Selection Factors for Award of Task/Delivery Orders, of the Omnibus contract, remains unchanged.
    3. Supporting information linking additional work to the original recommendation.

The addendum must be approved and signed by Brad Hayek in Bethesda (301) 227-2051 or John Simon in St. Louis (314) 262-4802 ext. 122 in OGICM.

NIMA Production Prototype (NPP) Contract/Agreement:

OGIC is currently working with PCM on a NIMA Production Prototype (NPP) Contract/Agreement to be awarded in July 2000. This procurement is a competitive special development announcement to facilitate changes to existing contract production baselines. Changes are the results of (1) new advancing technologies; (2) changes in imagery (NTM, SRTM, and commercial); and (3) changes from a product driven contract base to a geospatial/intelligence information contract base. It will augment the current Omnibus contract and is not intended to replace the Omnibus. It is being developed to allow for pricing structures which may not be amenable to firm-fixed pricing. Task Orders issued under these vehicles shall be for the purpose of developing, prototyping and demonstrating new or improved geospatial tools/processes, which may be subsequently employed by the Government and its contractors for Government purposes under NIMA production contracts. Task Orders may be developed and awarded in the same manner as the Omnibus. The only variance in the Task Order Process is the government estimate. The Omnibus requires OGIC to develop a realistic estimate of the costs for providing services while the NPP allows OGIC to provide a target allotment of funds. The selection of vendors via justification, preparation of an AF9, a funding estimate/target, and associated SOW documents are required for the Task Order.

 

Points of Contact:

Name

John Simon

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 122

(301) 227-2051

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 11 – SOURCE SELECTION

The purpose in having a source selection plan is to provide evaluation factors and information for the selection of sources in a competitive negotiated procurement or to ensure that each awardee is provided a fair opportunity of receiving the award of a delivery/task order under multiple delivery or task order contracts (such as the Omnibus).

A source selection plan sets forth the methodology, which will be used to select the successful offeror in negotiated procurements. The methodology must maximize competition, ensure impartial and comprehensive evaluation of offerors’ proposals, and ensure selection of the source whose proposal has the highest degree of realism and whose performance is expected to best meet the stated Government requirements. The source selection plan is procurement sensitive and must be protected from unauthorized disclosure to ensure fairness and integrity of the evaluation process. A source selection plan is necessary regardless of the method of selection. The plan is prepared by OGICM/Brad Hayek in Bethesda or John Simon in St. Louis, after consultation with the Project Leader and COR, in coordination with the Contracting Officer. The Contracting Officer must approve the plan. Additional information is available in Chapter 21 of the NIMA Guide for Preparing Purchase Request Packages at http://osis.nima.mil/pc/prguide2/chap21.htm. Keep in mind that this plan is utilized for a new contract source selection process. For task order vendor selection such as with the Omnibus contracts, a formal source selection plan is not required.

Points of Contact:

Name

John Simon

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 122

(301) 227-2051

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 12 – CONTRACTOR PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

The use and collection of past performance information (PPI) is key in acquiring the "best value" goods and services for the DOD, NIMA and the American taxpayer. Performance assessments are the responsibility of the program/project/contracting team, considering the customer’s input. The narrative is the most critical aspect of past performance information assessments. PPI motivates contractors to improve their performance because of the potential use of that information in future source selections. It is equally useful as a means of communication, providing feedback and additional performance incentives for ongoing contracts.

Contracting Officers will prepare an evaluation of contractor performance for each contract in excess of $100,000 (regardless of the date of contract award) at the time the work is completed. In addition, an evaluation shall be performed annually for all service contracts at $1,000,000 or over and for all architect-engineering contracts (the Omnibus falls into this category) greater than or equal to $25,000. Annual performance evaluations are due by the end of February of each calendar year for the previous year’s contractor performance.

12.A. PAST PERFORMANCE QUESTIONNAIRE

The COR, with the assistance of the Contracting Officer, will complete the appropriate performance evaluation form assessable on the PC internal home page.

For those task orders awarded off the Omnibus contracts, the DD Form 2631, Performance Evaluation (Architect-Engineer) is to be utilized. The cognizant COR shall act as the evaluating official in completing the form for each completed Omnibus contract/task order of more than $25,000 and shall seek input from the cognizant Contracting Officer. An evaluation needs to be completed immediately upon completion of a task order. The Past Performance Database (see 12.B. below) is our primary source for evaluating past performance of our contractors and is the source for ratings on the DD 2631. Use of this questionnaire assists in maintaining compliance with DoD policy regarding collection of past performance information when conducting performance assessment reviews.

Upon completion of the form by the COR, it will be forwarded to the appropriate Branch Chief for approval signature. The Branch Chief will forward the form to OGICM whereby a file consolidating all DD 2631s will be maintained. The form is forwarded to the Associate Director of OGIC (Paul Weise) for review and approval. Upon approval, OGIC will forward to the directorate head (D/DO - Bobbi Lenczowski) for review and approval. Upon approval by the directorate head, a copy is sent to the Contracting Officer. A copy will be provided to the contractor if there is an unsatisfactory rating, at which point the contractor will be given thirty (30) days to rebut. Note that we are not required to provide a copy to the contractor if other than an unsatisfactory rating is received. If the contractor provides comments or rebuttal to statements in the performance evaluation, we are required to incorporate the contractor’s rebuttal, resolve any factual discrepancies, and modify the evaluation as appropriate.

Performance evaluations with satisfactory ratings will immediately be distributed to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at the address below. Those pending contractor comments will be held until after receipt of the contractor’s comments or 30 days, whichever comes first.

U.S. Army Engineer District Portland

ATTN: CENWP-CT-A

Post Office Box 2946

Portland, OR 97208-2946

Phone: (503) 808-4590

Fax: (503) 808-7732

 

Points of Contact:

Name

John Simon

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext.122

(301) 227-2051

 

12.B. PAST PERFORMANCE DATABASE

The purpose for the Past Performance Database is to store the data necessary to measure performance of Omnibus prime contractors under contract with NIMA. The database contains historical data for both Omnibus and certain pre-Omnibus awards and tracks contractor performance in three areas: quality of deliverables, timeliness of deliverables, and customer satisfaction. It allows data to be retrieved on a task order by task order basis.

The Past Performance Database has three primary functions. First, it provides historical data and an audit trail for significant events within the performance period. Second, it provides performance assessment data to aid in risk analyses when ranking vendors for specific task orders. This data will be used in conjunction with other factors, including capacity and technical/management capability. Third, it will provide baseline data for metric studies, comparisons, and analyses.

The database is a FileMaker Pro file and is accessible to personnel in OGIC and PCM via passwords. It is imperative that OGIC CORs (they are the raters) timely keep this database accurate and current. A record should be created for each task order at the time of its award. Ongoing input of a contractor’s performance is required by the COR. Program Managers and Project Leaders have the option of inputting additional information as well.

The Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Using the Omnibus Past Performance Database is available online on the Past Performance Database. The database is named PastPerf.fp3 and resides on the STLFMServer, (IP address: 164.214.152.59). If you are using a PC follow the steps in 1. below. Macintosh users need to follow 2. below.

 

1. PC Instructions to Access the Database

Setting your network protocol

2. Macintosh Instructions to Access the Database

Setting your network protocol

Points of Contact:

Name

John Simon

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 122

(301) 227-2051

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 13 – TASK ORDER SOURCE SELECTION JUSTIFICATION

Project Leaders will identify task order requirements and develop a past performance assessment of qualified vendors. This is accomplished by determining the scope of work for the project along with determining if the requirement is for Surveying, Mapping and Charting, Imagery Intelligence and Photogrammetry, or some combination of these. Once the determination is made, find all contractors who have contracts in that/those functional areas. Some contractors will be deleted from your analysis as a result of this.

Determine what service(s) will be required by the project within the functional area(s). Compare the service(s) required to the services proposed by the functional area contractors, using the spreadsheet provided as Figure 13-1. Some contractors may be deleted from your analysis as a result of this.

The remaining contractors will constitute a group that is considered qualified in the service area(s) you require. Review these contractors by utilizing the Past Performance Database maintained by the CORs to develop a past performance assessment of qualified vendors. Make sure that the past performance you review in your selection is pertinent to your task (e.g., don't base your recommendation for mapping work on past performance for surveying).

Once the task order requirement with a past performance assessment of qualified vendors is completed, the Project Leader submits it to OGICM/Brad Hayek in Bethesda or John Simon in St. Louis who will prepare a source selection justification as part of the procurement package.

OGICM will apply the Selection Factors of Award of Task/Delivery Orders and determine the distribution of work to the contractors. In the justification the rationale for the analysis under each of the items listed below will be stated. As an example, one cannot simply state that Contractor A has the best past performance of the qualified vendors, but must include sufficient information to support the conclusion. For instance, note that the information comes from the past performance database (NITRO or other database in use by NIMA), or that of all the qualified contractors, only Contractor A has been error-free in its deliverables, etc. It is important to remember that the Past Performance Database is the primary source for performance data. A similar description of rationale should accompany factors (a), (b), and (c). Less description is necessary for factors (d) and (e) (they either have the required clearances/citizenship or not, and they are either required or not) and factor (f) (the contractor either has had awards in the past or not).

(a) Performance under Previous Task Orders

Past performance data for the appropriate contractors who have contracts in the functional area(s) you are looking for will be obtained from the Past Performance Database maintained by the CORs. Make sure that the past performance you review in your selection is pertinent to your task (e.g., don't base your recommendation for mapping work on past performance for surveying). Determine which Prime Contractor team has the best past performance in work similar to/identical to your task.

(b) Technical/Management Capabilities

Technical/Management capability information will be derived from the Omnibus Source Selection Information database, plus any negotiated changes to their team make-up. Determine which Prime Contractor team has the best technical/management capability to perform the work you need.

(c) Current Capacity and Workload

Current capacity and workload is based on contractor stated capacity and your estimate of the amount of work that the contractor can handle. Initially, this can be derived from the Omnibus Source Selection database. However, it is expected that the contractors will "grow capacity" as the contract progresses. You are encouraged to maintain active communication with all contractors to determine the evolving capacity of the firms. Determine which contractors have the capacity to meet your needs for this project.

Capacity is a major consideration in the selection of Task Order contractors. As a result, any unilateral thoughts to changing the due date of a requirement (either previously awarded or current) for the sole purpose of finding an otherwise qualified prime Most Highly Qualified are inappropriate.

(d) Required Security Clearances (if applicable)

Much of the work that NIMA does requires access to classified information. However, not all work does require this access. Determine if your project requires access to classified information, and if so, to what level. Review the clearances of the contractors (found in the Omnibus Source Selection database) to see which contractors have the clearances to perform this work.

(e) Required U.S. Citizenship (if applicable)

Much of the work that NIMA does requires U.S. citizenship. However, some work does not require U.S. citizenship. Determine if your project requires U.S. citizenship. Review the citizenship of the contractors (found in the Omnibus Source Selection database) to see which contractors have the proper citizenship to perform this work.

(f) Minimum Contract Guarantee Requirements

Each prime contractor is guaranteed $3,000.00 during the life of the contract, whether or not they perform any work. Contractors who have never had a chance to perform work under the Omnibus should be considered in order to obtain some work in exchange for the minimum.

The format of the recommendation should be as follows:

A. Name of project

B. Point of Contact

C. List of Contractors considered qualified

D. Rationale:

1. Past Performance of considered contractors

2. Technical/Management Capabilities

3. Capacity

4. Security Clearances

5. Citizenship

6. Minimum contract guarantees

E. Recommendation of selected contractor

Based on the results of the analysis, an informed business decision on which prime contractor team is the best one to perform your project will be made. Brad/John will prepare and sign the source selection justification. Based on the complexity of the project, the recommendation should be no more than two pages, and perhaps less. This justification with a recommendation, along with the rationale, will be submitted as part of the procurement package to the supporting contracting activity (PCM).

All justifications are to be approved by OGICM (Brad Hayek in Bethesda [301-227-2051] or John Simon in St. Louis [314-263-4802 x 122]) prior to delivery to PCM.

In reviewing the justifications, PCM will be comparing each justification with earlier justifications for similar services. PCM will be comparing the rank order of contractors in the current justification with the rank orders from earlier justifications. Absent any documentation to the contrary, PCM would anticipate that the rank orders would remain unchanged. If capacity, past performance, etc., of an earlier "top performer" has changed, it is recommended that this be noted in the justification to avoid confusion.

Points of Contact:

Name

John Simon

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 122

(301) 227-2051

 

Figure 13-1

 

Figure 13-1

Figure 13-1

Figure 13-1

Figure 13-1

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 14 – STATEMENT OF WORK/SCOPE OF WORK (SOW)

The Statement of Work (SOW) describes the essential technical requirements for items, materials, products, or services. This document includes the criteria for determining whether or not the requirement has been met. The SOW states the Government’s needs in terms of work tasks (e.g., work to be performed in developing or producing the goods to be delivered or services to be performed by a contractor).

The SOW should include all information the offeror will require in order to perform the work. If the SOW is for a task order against the Omnibus contracts, it should identify the required service by functional/service area identified in the contract (e.g., a requirement for color separation would be identified as a requirement under Mapping and Charting functional area, service area 2.2.1 Compilation).

It is critical that prior to submitting the procurement package to the Procurement and Contracts Office that the SOW is reviewed by the appropriate organizations as needed (e.g. PC, GC, technical leads).

The following guidelines and terminology apply when developing a SOW:

For additional guidance in preparing a Statement of Work, the "Department of Defense Handbook for Preparation of Statement of Work (SOW)", MIL-HDBK-245D, dated

3 April 1996, can be found at http://lrc3.monmouth.army.mil/cecom/lrc/pie/handb224.html.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 15 – DETAILED GOVERNMENT COST ESTIMATE

The independent government cost estimate provides an assessment of the cost or value of the requirement and assists the Agency in determining the budget necessary to fund the procurement. All requirements greater than $2,500 are required to have a government cost estimate. The requiring activity (Project Leader) will prepare a cost or price estimate based on one of the following:

Price Estimate. This type of estimate is based on overall price (the "bottom line"), rather than breaking down the separate costs elements. Among the methods which can be used are comparisons with catalogue prices, other market sources (Internet, trade journals, advertisements, etc.), historical data with an escalation factor for inflation, parametric comparisons (such as price per pound), or labor rates for government personnel performing similar tasks. Estimates for commercial items are typically determined through these methods, and as a result of market surveys.

Cost Estimate. This detailed estimate is used to assess the reasonableness of a proposed price as well as to pinpoint technical deficiencies in the contractor’s specifications. The basic cost elements of a detailed estimate include direct man-hour costs (including labor rates) estimated to perform the effort, the estimated cost of materials (including subcontracts), estimated travel costs, other direct service costs (such as computer time required), indirect burden rates (overheads, General and Administrative expenses, material handling) and profit.

There is no mandatory format but the format does depend upon the type and complexity of the estimate to be prepared. The estimate should be prepared by the requirement activity (Project Leader) in the earliest stage of procurement planning and updated, if necessary, prior to finalizing the procurement package and requesting funds. Individuals responsible for preparing material that may include information designated as source selection information (see Section 20 of this Handbook) shall mark the cover page and each page that contains source selection information with the legend "SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION—SEE FAR 3.104". The cost or price estimated is to be submitted as part of the procurement package to PCM.

For packages involving the Omnibus contracts, the Government Estimate should reflect the level of effort the Project Leader believes is required to perform the work. The estimate should be broken out by number of hours of labor category, using the labor rates specified in the contract. In the case where multiple subcontractors could perform the work, and the Government has no preference, the Project Leader may use any of the subcontractor rates, or may use the prime contractor’s rate. If the Project Leader is confident as to which subcontractor the prime contractor will use, then that subcontractor’s rates should be utilized in the estimate. The estimate should also include an estimate of any Other Direct Costs (paper, computer media, film, etc.), as well as profit. Keep in mind that this estimate is needed in order to provide the appropriate amount on the funding document and that amount is also reflected in the source selection justification.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 16 – FUNDING DOCUMENT

The funding document provides written assurance from a responsible fiscal authority that adequate funds are available for the proposed contract. The purchase request, after approvals and certification of funds by NIMA’s Financial Management Directorate (CFO), constitutes the authority to effect a local purchase. Without a proper purchase request, the Contracting Officer cannot start a contracting action. Funding documents are needed for all requirements, including purchase order requests, delivery orders, new contracts, and modifications to existing contracts.

Funding documents are typically Air Force Form 9s, Request for Purchase, although AF Form 616s, Fund Cite Authorization, may be used to fund an entire program. An AF 9 is the funding document normally used to fund new contract actions, or to add funds to existing contracts for various reasons (i.e., increase incremental funding, award options, fund changes to a contract, etc.). It is the streamlined purchasing request form. An AF 616 is normally issued for a specific purpose and to specific recipients in order to certify availability of bulk funds to be used within a stated period of availability. For example, when making purchases with a Government credit card, the purchase cardholder will request bulk funds to be used within a specific period and limited to an estimated amount needed during that period. The purchase cardholder may then draw down from the authorized funding, to make purchases on an intermittent basis. In the event that an AF 616 has been submitted to PCM already, simply note that in a cover memo to PCM. Instructions on filling out either the AF 9 or 616 are provided in Chapter 4 of the NIMA Guide for Preparing Purchase Request Packages at http://osis.nima.mil/pc/prguide2/chap4.htm. Specific questions pertaining to these funding documents should be referred to your supporting Financial Execution Division (CFO-$E).

The requiring activity (Project Leader) shall prepare an AF 9. Once completed, the Branch Chief will sign as the Approving Official on the AF 9. If the requirement is between $2,500 and $100,000 (simplified acquisition procedures), an order against an existing contract or a modification to an existing contract, only the first page of the AF Form 9 may be required to be completed.

To insure timely accounting of committed and obligated funds, the following procedures will be followed throughout OGIC:

Once prepared, the funding document is to be provided to Gail Harding/Nora Nakagama in OGICM, (fax acceptable -- DSN 287-4749). The document will then be checked for availability of funds and correct classification codes. Gail/Nora will initial and forward it to CFO-$E/Kathy Johnston in St. Louis or Jan Robertson in Bethesda. CFO-$E will not sign any of these documents without Gail/Nora’s initials.

For OGIC St. Louis: A Project Leader will send the original AF 9 to CFO-$E/Kathy Johnston who will attach the initialed copy provided by Gail/Nora for her records. Kathy in turn will send authorized copies of the AF 9 directly to the supporting Contracting Officer in PCM as well as mail a copy to OGICM/Gail and/or Nora.

For OGIC Bethesda: Gail/Nora will send the original AF 9 directly to the supporting Contracting Officer in PCM for final processing.

Changes to AF 9s will be hand corrected and provided (if need be faxed) to Gail/Nora.

Points of Contact:

Name

Gail Harding

Nora Nakagama

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(301) 227-2051

(301) 227-2051

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 17 – SECURITY REQUIREMENTS/DD FORM 254

The DD Form 254, Contract Security Classification Specification, with its attachments, supplements, and incorporated references, provides the contractor with the security requirements and classification guidance needed for performance of a classified contract. A DD 254 must be completed, signed, and approved if the contractor will create or have access to classified information. The requiring activity (Project Leader) will prepare a DD 254 for requirements which are classified or which have operational security requirements in accordance with the instructions provided in Chapter 9 of the NIMA Guide for Preparing Purchase Request Packages at http://osis.nima.mil/pc/prguide2/chap9.htm. Questions pertaining to this document should be referred to the Missions Support Security Services Division.

The Omnibus contracts contain a DD 254 which is valid for all functional areas (Surveying, Mapping and Charting, Imagery Intelligence and Photogrammetry) up to the SECRET level. If your requirement is SECRET or below, a separate DD 254 is not required (though additional security handling information may be included in the Task Order as applicable). However, if a higher security level is required, the Project Leader, in conjunction with the applicable security office, must prepare a DD 254 at the appropriate level.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 18 – DELIVERY REQUIREMENTS

The delivery/performance requirements set forth the time, place and method(s) for delivering/performing the required line items and subline items and/or services and is necessary for all requirements. The requiring activity (Project Leader) provides the delivery or performance requirements for each deliverable. Individual completion times, as well as overall period of performance may be appropriate for some services; i.e., "The period of performance is 01 Oct 20XX through 30 Sep 20XX with specified completion times for separable requirements". Further, the time may be expressed in "on or before"; "during the months ____", or "not sooner than ____ or later than ____". The delivery requirements will be submitted as part of the procurement package to PCM.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 19 – LIQUIDATED DAMAGES

Liquidated Damages: An express provision in a contract stating a sum for which one of the parties will be liable upon breach of contract or failure to perform.

Liquidated Damages provide compensation to the government for late delivery or performance when it is unlikely that actual damages can be determined. Liquidated damages clauses should be used when (1) the proposed contract is a fixed price effort for supplies and/or services; (2) the time of delivery or performance is an important factor in the award of the contract and the government reasonably expects to suffer damage if the delivery or performance is late; and (3) the extent or amount of such damage would be difficult or impossible to ascertain or prove.

The rate of liquidated damages used must be reasonable and considered on a case-by-case basis since liquidated damages fixed without any reference to probable actual damages may be held to be a penalty, and therefore unenforceable. Where applicable, the COR will determine the liquidated damages rate and provide supporting rationale to the Contracting Officer. The Contracting Officer ensures the resulting potential damages are not unreasonable. Guidance for calculating liquidated damages is provided in Chapter 10 of the NIMA Guide for Preparing Purchase Request Packages at http://osis.nima.mil/pc/prguide2/chap10.htm or on the PC home page.

Note: Under the Omnibus contracts, the liquidated damages rate is already specified.

Because each task order has variable circumstances, it is difficult to develop a set formula or cookie cutter approach to appropriately assess consideration for late deliveries. However, where circumstances are similar, consistency must be practiced. In order to maintain an appropriate level of consistency with respect to negotiated consideration, all OGIC analyses of consideration for later deliveries must be approved through OGICM (Brad Hayek in Bethesda or John Simon in St. Louis). The intent is for Project Leaders and CORs to provide an analysis to them prior to forwarding the recommendation to PCM.

Keep in mind that CORs must closely monitor their task orders and vendor performance and notify the Contracting Officer immediately after determination that deliveries will be late. The importance of projecting last deliveries PRIOR TO scheduled delivery dates can not be emphasized enough. The standard of procedure for assessing liquidated damages under the Omnibus is as follows:

While delivery dates have always been negotiable, there has been some reluctance on the contractors’ part to suggest revised delivery dates. Therefore, task order Request for Proposals (RFPs) will state the NIMA planned delivery date, and advise the contractors that an alternate schedule can be proposed and negotiated. Note that this will not occur when NIMA has a firm requirement date from the end-user, as in Crisis or Committed operations.

NIMA CORs are responsible for aggressively monitoring contractor performance. This could require more frequent trips to the contractor work sites, in order to see firsthand the status of the project, as well as to gain early notification of potential problems. Reliance on contractor status reports has historically been problematical, since historically the reports are generalized, and tend to not report problems until they have grown significantly. Contractors are responsible for the accuracy of their status reports since this is a criterion in Past Performance evaluations. CORs are responsible for providing updated feedback as soon as possible to the Contracting Officer and the Project Leader.

In addition, the COR is required to aggressively monitor NIMA performance. This includes monitoring the delivery of required government furnished property, the status of reviews, the status of technical comments and questions, etc. CORs are responsible for providing updated feedback as soon as possible to the Contracting Officer and Project Leader.

In the event that a contractor is late, or is projected to be late in final delivery, the Contracting Officer, in consultation with OGIC, may take one of the following actions:

    1. Revise the scheduled due date. The revised due date will be based on the contractor’s capabilities to perform the work, as well as any other factors that might impact the due date (learning curves, other work assigned, level of difficulty, etc.). The Government will negotiate consideration for the schedule extension. The consideration will be either monetary or non-monetary (additional work, etc.), and will be based on the best business judgement of the Contracting Officer, taking into account learning curves, Government contribution to the delay, and any other factors that may impact on the amount of a fair and reasonable consideration for the delay. The amount can be equal to or different than the amount of liquidated damages that would have been incurred.
    2. Impose liquidated damages. Liquidated damages will remain in the Omnibus contracts. They incentivize the contractor to perform expeditiously. They may be imposed for the time period where the contractor is fully at fault for the delay and the Contracting Officer determines negotiation of a revised delivery date for this delay is not appropriate.
    3. Terminate the order for failure of the contractor to fulfill its contract obligations. The Government can exercise its right to terminate due to the contractor’s actual or anticipated failure to perform its contractual obligations, and the contractor is at fault for this actual or anticipated failure. Termination should be used only when it is in the Government’s interest. Often, extension of the delivery date (for consideration) or the imposition of liquidated damages, rather than termination, would be in the Government’s interest.
    4. Other action as provided for in the contract and the law. Contractors already understand that their chance for future work depends on the criteria contained in Clause H-4, Selection Factors for Award of Task/Delivery Orders, of the Omnibus contracts. Past performance is a major consideration in future awards. NIMA will rely mainly on the implementation of the Clause at H-4 to incentivize contractors to perform. Liquidated damages will not be the main incentivization.

Omnibus Deliverable Situation:

We have had a situation where the contract review of a deliverable was not sent back to the vendor for corrections until well past the 60 days allowed in the base Omnibus contract. This particular deliverable had a significant amount of rework associated with it. However, by exceeding the 60 days, the Government had constructively accepted the data by failing to review it in a timely manner. Unfortunately, this delay eliminated any rights the Government had to assess liquidated damages or consideration, which, in this particular case, would have applied. Additionally, since the data was delivered on time and was now accepted, the product was considered on time without regard to the additional days required for rework. The contractor was still responsible to deliver the rework within 21 days from receipt or they were subject to default. We also could address the performance of the vendor under Customer Satisfaction and Quality. Remember that under the Omnibus contract, the Government has 60 days for the first review and 30 days for the second review.

Points of Contact:

Name

John Simon

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 156

(301) 227-2051

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 20 – PROPRIETARY DATA HANDLING

"Contractor bid or proposal information" means any of the following information submitted to a Federal agency as part of or in connection with a bid or proposal to enter into a Federal agency procurement contract, if that information has not been previously made available to the public or disclosed publicly:

(1) Cost or pricing data.

(2) Indirect costs and direct labor rates.

(3) Proprietary information about manufacturing processes, operations, or techniques marked by the contractor in accordance with applicable law or regulation.

(4) Information marked by the contractor as "contractor bid or proposal information" in accordance with applicable law or regulation.

(5) Information marked in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR).

"Source selection information" means any of the following information which is prepared for use by a Federal agency for the purpose of evaluating a bid or proposal to enter into a Federal agency procurement contract, if that information has not been previously made available to the public or disclosed publicly:

(1) Bid prices submitted in response to a Federal agency invitation for bids, or lists of those bid prices before bid opening.

(2) Proposed costs or prices submitted in response to a Federal agency solicitation, or lists of those proposed costs or prices.

(3) Source selection plans.

(4) Technical evaluation plans.

(5) Technical evaluations of proposals.

(6) Cost or price evaluations of proposals.

(7) Competitive range determinations that identify proposals that have a reasonable chance of being selected for award of a contract.

(8) Rankings of bids, proposals, or competitors.

(9) Reports and evaluations of source selection panels, boards, or advisory councils.

(10) Other information marked as "Source Selection Information -- See FAR 3.104" based on a case-by-case determination by the head of the agency or designee, or the contracting officer, that its disclosure would jeopardize the integrity or successful completion of the Federal agency procurement to which the information relates.

A person shall not, other than as provided by law, knowingly disclose contractor bid or proposal information or source selection information. In accordance with FAR 3.104-5 -- Disclosure, Protection, and Marking of Contractor Bid or Proposal Information and Source Selection Information, the following guidance should be followed:

(a) Except as specifically provided for in the FAR, no person or other entity may disclose contractor bid or proposal information or source selection information to any person other than a person authorized, in accordance with applicable agency regulations or procedures, by the head of the agency or designee, or the contracting officer, to receive such information.

(b) Contractor bid or proposal information and source selection information shall be protected from unauthorized disclosure in accordance with the FAR, applicable law, and agency regulations.

(c) In determining whether particular information is source selection information, consult with agency officials as necessary. Individuals responsible for preparing material

that may be source selection information shall mark the cover page and each page that the individual believes contains source selection information with the legend

"Source Selection Information -- See FAR 3.104." Although some information is considered to be source selection information whether or not marked, all reasonable efforts shall be made to mark such material with the same legend.

Nothing restricts or prohibits the Government’s use of technical data in a manner consistent with the Government’s rights in the data.

The Contractor is responsible to notify the government of any and all proprietary information being considered under a contract. There are FAR provisions and contract clauses regarding how a contractor should mark information it deems proprietary. The Contractor should send a letter to the Contracting Officer stating what information it considers proprietary. Assuming we agree that it is proprietary, then the information is treated as propriety to the extent of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The contract terms should clearly delineate these agreements between the parties. The Contractor should not assume unilateral decisions on proprietary information.

Individual NIMA employees should not sign an agreement with a Contractor. The contract is between a Contractor and NIMA. How information is treated is between NIMA (officially represented by the Contracting Officer) and the Contractor. NIMA is responsible to ensure Government employees involved in a contract effort are notified and are properly knowledgeable on handling proprietary and other information.

Point of Contact:

Name

Paulette Martin

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 156

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 21 – SOURCE PACKAGES

Source packages are typically sent to the contractor for their review prior to their proposal. On-site review of source material should be restricted to those cases in which there is a compelling reason to have the contractor incur the cost. In those cases where on-site review of source is required, please allow at least seven (7) days notice to the contractor, plus additional time to prepare the proposal.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 22 – QUALITY ASSURANCE INSPECTIONS

Quality is an important element of our contracts/task orders. Many of our contracts/task orders will require the production of a large number of data items with few if any errors tolerated. Achieving virtually error free production requires a conscientious and comprehensive quality program that consistently builds quality into the products. The Government must have full confidence in the quality of the deliverable to allow the Government to employ statistical sampling techniques to minimize the deliverable acceptance process. Quality Control/Quality Assurance deliverables shall meet standards and procedures that clearly demonstrate the quality assurance standards set forth in the contract and generally accepted practices in the commercial market place for the services being performed, as well as those special standards and specifications that comply with provisions as set forth in individual contracts/task orders. The Government reserves the right to inspect all contract processes and documentation to assess the contractor’s compliance with and commitment to the basic Quality System.

Government contract quality assurance is the various functions, including inspection, performed by the Government, to determine whether a contractor has fulfilled the contract obligations pertaining to quality and quantity. The type and extent of contract quality requirements needed depends on the particular acquisition and may range from inspection at time of acceptance to a requirement for the contractor's implementation of a comprehensive program for controlling quality.

NIMA uses reviews as "control gates" during data item production. That is, reviews may be used at various stages to determine readiness to proceed to the next step. Reviews are tailored to the requirements of the project.

Quality assurance reviews are not held for problem solving. These reviews are the process by which we are evaluating deliverables for conformance to stated task order/contract specifications and standards. These reviews not in any way relieve the contractor from performing their own internal quality assurance reviews.

Points of Contact:

Name

All Branch Chiefs

Organization

OGICF, OGICN and OGICR

Phone Number

Bethesda and St. Louis

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 23 – CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS

QUALITY ASSURANCE CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATION PLAN AND AUDITS

This Section establishes the policies and procedures for conducting audits of the adequacy and effectiveness for quality assurance surveillance efforts performed by our Project Leaders and Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) within OGIC. This Section identifies the duties and responsibilities of the Contract Production element and quality assurance personnel for the monitoring and evaluation of the contractor qualification plan.

References:

  1. Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 46.4, Government Contract Quality Assurance
  2. Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) Part 246.4, Government Contract Quality Assurance
  3. ISO 9001, Quality System Standard
  4. ISO 10011-2, Auditing Quality System

Figures:

23-1: OGIC Contract Management Checklist for Contractor Qualification Evaluation and Quality System Audits

    1. : Statement of Contractor Qualification Letter

Qualifications:

NIMA personnel evaluating and qualifying the contractor program should be at a minimum Level II certified in the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) Production, Manufacturing & Quality Assurance or Program Management career tracks, and meet ISO 10011-2 guidelines for Auditing Quality System. This requirement is pursuant to NIMA Acquisition Policy Directive PD 5000R1, 29 March 1999, which states that we designate, certify, and train the acquisition personnel in accordance with current statutes and DOD professional standards. Also, NIMA Instruction 5000.1 states that all acquisition projects will be aligned into well-defined programs under certified program managers.

Contractor Certification Plan:

NIMA’s transition to commercial standards continues to be present and future policy as a result of Acquisition Reform. Therefore, our contracts are specifying commercial quality system standards (e.g. ISO 9000 series). In addition, NIMA contractors have embraced the change from military standards to commercial practices and system standards. Our contractor certification program for evaluating a proposed and existing commercial quality system should be logical, effective, and efficient process. However, when necessary to evaluate a contractor’s quality system to determine their qualification, we should be very careful to examine and validate only those quality system elements directed by the contractual document, customer, or specific elements where existing data does not provide contractor confidence. NIMA will continue utilizing the ISO 9000 series criterion as a basic framework against which our activity validates contractor qualifications. The contractor’s qualification program is responsible for establishing, incorporating, and maintaining a quality system that complies with the contract requirements.

Within the parameters of the ISO 9000 series, NIMA shall be limited to the specific portions of the quality system of the contractor that have been identified for review by the customer, or the portion of the system where confidence in compliance is lacking. NIMA shall not initiate audits when the assigned COR or Project Leaders find existing data sufficient to establish confidence in the contractor’s quality system.

Contractor Qualification Results:

When a contractor’s evaluation or qualification review is finalized, NIMA should notify the contractor in writing with the result. This written notification shall identify the applicable qualification and acceptance of their quality system standard. However, when evaluations or audits indicate significant noncompliance areas or processes, the written notice shall identify the exact defect or deficiency area(s) of noncompliance.

Quality System Evaluation:

  1. Auditing and assessing contractor control of product quality and compliance to contract quality, technical and other contractual requirements is performed through the surveillance of contractor production, manufacturing and other associated processes during contract performance. The type, intensity and frequency of the qualification audit shall vary based on the process risk. The quality audit of the contractor production process detects conditions that will adversely affect delivery or performance criteria. Onsite assessments are required on all prime contracts or customer requested audits.
  2. Audits of contractor production, manufacturing and product assurance and other associated processes will be accomplished by reviewing relevant contractor data, process evaluation and product audits depending on the process risk and contractor past performance. The results of all audits will be recorded on the Quality Assurance Evaluation Checklist provided as Figure 23-1 below. Also, as a minimum, the evaluation checklist shall reflect the number and nature of observations made, the number and nature of defects found and corrective actions initiated to resolve deficiencies.
  3. Branch Chiefs of personnel responsible for accomplishing Contractor Qualification and Quality System Audits will determine how timely and/or effectively assigned personnel perform the audit outlined in this Section, including the following quality assurance analysis:
  1. Identifying customer requirements, including contract requirements, customer imposed inspections or other associated audits.
  2. Imposed inspections or other associated tasks.
  3. Identifying critical processes and documenting rationale.
  4. Risk-classifying critical processes and documenting rationale.
  5. Developing and maintaining the written surveillance plan.
  6. Prioritizing work based upon risk classifications.
  7. Performing and documenting surveillance (to include proofing and re-proofing product or process).
  8. Collecting and reporting data and delivery status information.
  9. Analyzing data and adjusting surveillance (based on the documented analysis).
  10. Compliance with customer imposed inspections or other associated tasks, when applicable.

Branch Chiefs may request the technical assistance from the OGIC Contract Management Department (OGICM) as needed.

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Bob Bella

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 129

 

 

Figure 23-1

OGIC CONTRACT MANGEMENT CHECKLIST FOR CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATION EVALUATION AND QUALITY SYSTEM AUDITS

FUNCTIONAL AREA________________ TYPE OF INSPECTION______________

PROJECT LEADER/COR_____________________ EVALUATION DATE_______

Q-Outstanding U-Unsatisfactory Condition which cannot

S-Satisfactory be corrected within 10-days

D-Deficiency Noted which was X-Function Not Applicable

corrected on-the-spot

I. CONTRACT REVIEW

The review of the contract and technical package should identify all quality characteristics or services and determine the contractor’s method of control.

Can we develop an area layout diagram, together with flow chart, if required, of production, materials, central inspection points with the Statement of Work as guidelines? If not, the contractor will be in non-compliance with the standard.

II. IDENTIFY CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS

Review the contractual document, along with any other customer guidance or direction, to gain a clear understanding of customer requirements and using activity mission.

III. IDENTIFY CRITICAL PROCESSES

Review contractor production plans for satisfying contract requirements and evaluate for adequacy. Incorporate a sequence of events involving chart form to be developed with the contractor with which to evaluate progress. Take into consideration the customer’s requirements and mission statement. Specific process controls should coincide to significantly affect contract technical, schedule, or cost performance parameters. The significant output of each of these critical processes shall also be identified by the contractor.

IV. RISK-CLASSIFY CRITICAL PROCESSES

In the classification of process risk, consider the contractor’s production experience and capacity, along with the contractor’s past performance historical data. In addition, determine process efficiency, effectiveness, and review relevant government and contractor data (e.g. product quality deficiency reports, contract action reports, delivery performance history, waivers, deviations, and cost control history) to thoroughly assess the risk factors associated with each critical process control. Each critical process shall be classified to one of the following risk categories for quality assurance surveillance:

LOW RISK: Data provides confidence in process performance. Cited processes will be subject to periodic verification utilizing product audits, to validate process data, and ensure confidence.

MODERATE RISK: Data available is insufficient to categorize as high or low risk. Quality audits will be used to verify critical process outputs as a minimum until the specific process is verified or there is sufficient contractor/government data to reclassify as high or low risk category.

HIGH RISK: Data depicts significant doubt on process performance. Process shall be scheduled for verification as soon as possible. Intensive, frequent product audits will be utilized to verify critical process outputs until process is at an acceptable level and there is sufficient data to reclassify as low or moderate risk. Intensive product audits are samplings that provide a statistically valid level of confidence that the contractor is presenting only conforming product(s) to the government for acceptance.

V. MAINTAIN A WRITTEN CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATION PLAN

Incorporate a written plan for surveillance of the contractor’s critical quality assurance, validating production processes, and reporting production status to the OGIC Contract Management Department (OGICM). The level of detail will vary depending on the requirements, product complexity and criticality of a specific operation; however, as a minimum, all surveillance plans shall include the following monitoring system:

  1. Summary of strategy and tactics for soliciting NIMA’s input to surveillance planning, and maintaining communications with the government throughout contractual document performance.
  2. Identify a list of critical processes in each risk category, and supporting rationale.
  3. Surveillance techniques (i.e. product audits, process verification and revalidate controls) planned for each critical process, including scheduling random sampling plans, and determine frequency.
  4. Specific process control for anticipating delivery delinquencies.
  5. Documentation of surveillance activities.

VI. PERFORM SURVEILLANCE AND REPORTING

Perform the surveillance tasks identified in the cited surveillance plan above. Technical judgment and expertise will designate the exact methodology, intensity and frequency of product audits. If a product by product sampling plan is the methodology chosen, and no cited plan is contractually specified, a plan with an acceptance criterion number of observations shall be documented. Whenever surveillance indicates contractor failure to comply with the contractual document, contractor corrective action shall be implemented. Contract production and delivery status reporting to the OGIC Contract Management Department (OGICM) shall be accomplished for all contracts, unless the Contracting Officer specifies otherwise in the contract.

VII. DATA ANALYSIS AND ADJUSTING SURVEILLANCE

Government and contractor data shall be periodically analyzed to determine which areas and processes exhibit adverse statistical trend analysis. The results of all data analyses will be recorded in a convenient format. As a minimum, records shall identify the data in conjunction with customer feedback and shall be used to adjust critical process risk classifications, the intensity and frequency of product audits, and to update the established surveillance plan.

VIII. SUBCONTRACTED PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

The prime contractor will be familiar with their subcontractor operations and methods of controlling specific vendor processes or services. Also, the prime contractor will establish and incorporate subcontractor or vendor quality control audit process.

IX. PRODUCTION/QUALITY ASSURANCE AND RELEASE DOCUMENTATION

After all contractual line items and data items have been delivered and final acceptance has been performed by the government, the Government representative shall verify that the material inspection and receiving report (DD Form 250) has been finalized with a "Z" in block number 1. Ensure appropriate authorized signature is entered and accepted, when required.

X. RECORDS RETENTION

The records associated with each contract will be retained until 6 1/2 years (over $25,000.00) after the completion of the contract, unless otherwise directed by the Contracting Officer. This time limit will be extended during contract warranty periods.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 23-1

CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATION LETTER

In response to your firm’s Quality System Procedures dated _________, our Project Leader or Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) within the Contract Production Division (OGIC) of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) has thoroughly reviewed the quality system processes employed by your company. On the basis of this review the quality system appears to be at an acceptable level.

This Statement of Qualification does not relieve your firm in any way from continuing to comply with the requirements of the ISO 9000 series and the contract.

This notice does not signify a preference for or endorsement of your products or services by the OGIC/Contract Production entity and shall not be used for advertisements or other associated publicity.

Acknowledgment of this communication is requested.

 

 

 

Chief

____________ Branch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copies furnished: Supporting Contracting Officer

OGIC Department Chief

 

 

Figure 23-2

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 24 – BRIEFINGS FOR OPS INTEL MEETING

Briefings are items that are customer related that will update/give facts/results from a meeting, special product produced, or production that is visible to management that OGI has participated in. They are on timely items, something that has happened within the last few days. Example: Tours, special products produced, meetings attended, update on past briefings, update on actions/questions from the Director. At times they may cross Divisions or even be a joint briefing with another Directorate. They are a good forum to spread the word on "good news stories".

OGI "Good News" Briefings are presented only on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, when the Director is present at the Ops/Intel Meetings. There will be no briefings on Mondays and Wednesdays. A minimum of at least one OGI "Good News" briefing will be presented each week.

Briefings should only be 3 to 5 minutes. They do not have to have a slide or be very long. Topics can be one minute with no slides if it’s important for OGI to tell a customer benefit. Include visuals of any product/data/graphic being discussed. Remember graphics, graphics, graphics are important! The presenter should be capable of briefing Senior Management and answer questions. They should by all means expect questions. Organizations should dry run briefings as necessary.

NO PROCESS BRIEFINGS – ONLY FACTS AND RESULTS. The Director is looking for RESULTS, IMPACT and READINESS.

Briefings should have who, what, when, where and why. The relationship to the customer is very important. They should address and focus on the following:

    1. What is the issue?
    2. What is the customer requirement?
    3. How will the product/service/data be used by the customer? State customer mission and relevancy of NIMA’s support.
    4. What did we do to satisfy the requirement?
    5. Were innovative solutions developed to support the customer?
    6. Was the support programmed/committed or crisis production? State any production impacts that resulted from the support.
    7. Know if asked, but DO NOT brief, costs.
    8. Graphics – REQUIRED; Support your success story with state-of-the-art graphics. Actual product.
    9. Emphasize THE CUSTOMER and RESULTS . . .

Procedures for OGI Briefings to the Ops/Intel Meeting

Each Wednesday, by close of business, OGIC will send to the OGI Ops Support Team suggested topics for the Ops/Intel Meeting.

Each Thursday, the OGI Ops Support Team will then coordinate with the organizations as to who the lead on the topic will be and the collaborators to insure an OGI "Good News" briefing.

Each Friday, the OGI Ops Support Team will consolidate the topics from all OGI Divisions and present these topics to the OGI senior management at the OGI Staff Meeting for approval.

Following the staff meeting, the OGI Ops Support Team will work with organizations in scheduling briefings with the NIMA Operations Center-Bethesda (NOC-B).

Prior to the briefing, Lead Organizations will review the briefing/prepare briefer. For OGIC briefings, it is OGIC’s responsibility to insure that the briefing write up is correct and includes the proper information for the Director. A list of generic questions that should be answered in the briefing or that the lead and/or collaborating organizations need to be able to answer at the briefing are provided below as Figure 24-1. The briefings need to be short, relevant customer focused and graphics based. The Director wants substantive briefings (not process). We need to tell a story. The main character is the customer.

An OGI Representative at the Ops/Intel Meeting will not be presenting the briefing. The organization submitting the briefing is expected to have a knowledgeable person in the audience to present the briefing. It is also the responsibility of the organization to insure the person presenting the briefing is capable of presenting to the Director and can answer questions properly.

The OGI Representative at the table will introduce the presenter. The presenter does not need to be in Bethesda.

Three (3) days prior to the scheduled briefing date, OGIC will send the briefing to the OGI Ops Support Team for review.

After review, two (2) days prior to the scheduled briefing date, the OGI Ops Support Team will send the briefing to the Director/OGI and Deputy Director/OGI for final approval.

One (1) day prior to the briefing, the OGI Ops Support Team will send the briefing to the NOC-B for inclusion into the Director/NIMA’s Read Ahead folder for his approval.

Points of Contact:

Name

Bob Montgomery

Brad Hayek

Organization

OGICM

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 147

(301) 227-2051

 

Figure 24-1

Guidance for OGI Briefings to the NIMA Ops/Intel Meeting.

The following guidance is to help OGI focus on the necessary information for briefing at the NIMA Ops/Intel Meetings. This guidance is a collection of previous guidance from OGI Management, NIMA Ops Center-Bethesda (NOC-B) guidance and questions consistently asked by the D/NIMA.

  1. OGI has "a great story to tell". "We need to tell that story." With the "main character" of the story being the customer.
  2. Who’s the Customer? "The briefings need to be short, relevant, customer focused and graphic based." "We need to reiterate the mission we were/are supporting, why the data was important to the customer, what the data was and any innovative solutions we arrived at."
  3. The Director wants substantive briefings. "Tell what we did, not how we did it (no process). What product or data did OGI produce for the customer? Do not plan to discuss process in the formal brief, but if asked, be prepared to discuss process and cost ($$ or workyears).
  4. It’s ok to mention a new process, if it made us more "responsive and efficient and we met the customer’s quality expectations". Did the new process help the product quality or accuracy? Be sure to have the cost/time savings ($$ or workyears or days).

  5. What does the data/product support? Is it programmed, an intrusion, substitute for a programmed product/data, special etc…? Is this for training, exercise, special mission, op plan, and general readiness?" Know if this effort was part of our normal production program (based on CJCSI 3901.01 priorities) or an intrusion (unprogrammed)" If it’s unprogrammed work, "be prepared to speak to the impact to our production program. What work (product/s, where, for who) was impacted and how have we coordinated with our customer" to resolve these impacts.
  6. "Understand the impact to the customer, positive or negative and any specific feedback, (comments, quotes, etc.).

  7. Who did OGI work with outside of OGI (IA, PCO, etc…) or agency (State Dept., FBI, CIA etc…)?
  8. Use graphics to help communicate what we are doing, whether it’s terrain/scene or information in general. Use props in the Directors Briefing room and/or use the VTC to project data to all participates. Even if the product or data is too large to show on the VTC, a piece of the product or data on the VTC will go a long way in explaining the product or data.
  9. How does this fit into the NIMA or Customer "bigger picture" (NIMA Strategic Plan, Joint Vision 2010, Joint Chiefs of Staff)?
  10. Are there any outstanding NIMA policy issues? Be prepared to discuss them. Review with NP before briefing. Have NP spokesmen at the meeting if necessary.
  11. Are there any sensitive issues that should not be aired to a general audience? If so, make sure NP has reviewed and told you what can be said.
  12. If contractor related briefing, be prepared to discuss contract vs in-house issues if related. Such as % of production done in-house vs on contract, cost comparisons, are there savings, number of resources – contractor vs in-house.
  13. If a digital product that was originally a hardcopy product, what is the cost comparisons, product accuracy vs hardcopy, etc…? Are we still producing the hardcopy? How much digital vs. hardcopy is produced? What’s the customer feedback on the digital data vs. hardcopy?
  14. Where is the data stored/located, internally and externally? Is it accessible to the customer? If not accessible, why not? If on a web site, how does the customer get the data? Is this actual data or just a listing of the products?
  15. "Have the right people in attendance at the briefing (CST member, IA, etc.) to support questions which come up that are outside of the briefers area of expertise."
  16. Be concise and to the point. Per the NOC-B, briefings can be 3 to 5 minutes plus questions.
  17. Do not use acronyms – spell out and/or speak the words not the acronym. Do not say initiative, but spell out and/or say the mission that is being supported.
  18. This is a OGI briefing. OGI produced/created/did the work not a person or branch or division within OGI. This is not the place to publicly thank a person or branch or division.
  19. Prior to the actual briefing the lead organization needs to review/dry run the briefing.
  20. "It is highly recommended that new briefers sit in for 2-3 Ops/Intel Meetings prior to their briefing to get a feel for the environment…where everyone sits, how the meeting and the briefings occur, as well as the kinds of questions that are asked."

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 25 – ITEMS OF INTEREST (IOI)

As a means of bettering communication within OGI and furthering the workforce's understanding of activities pertinent to the organization and agency as a whole, a report detailing these activities is produced weekly. This report, called the OGI Items of Interest (IOI), aims to enhance understanding of the wide variety of projects that OGI is involved with at any given time. Items of Interest are generally divided into one of several categories: production, training, process, development, support, and meetings, tours and briefings. Items of Interest are additionally a forum for announcing activities that much of the organization might not be aware of, so everyone is encouraged to participate.

Send all OGIC Items of Interest to OGICM/Dave Chen ((301) 227-2051 or DSN 287-2051, MS D-68) by close of business on Mondays for inclusion in the overall OGI report. Kyle Simon of OGI/XO is the OGI representative in charge of the total IOI effort.

An example of an IOI is as follows:

SRTM Briefing for the National States Geographic Information Council

On March 24, 2000 Mr. Don Smith, GIMA, and Mr. Barry Heady, GICS, briefed the National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) on the status of Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) post processing efforts, and resulting products. The NSGIC is comprised of geographer representatives from each state’s Department of Natural Resources. The emphasis of the briefing was to familiarize Council members with SRTM and to provide status of the SRTM Vertical Obstruction (VO) Study. The SRTM VO Study could potentially yield candidate Vertical Obstruction information that could be shared with the state organizations, who in-turn, could assist in the validation of the candidate VOs.

(GICS/Barry C. Heady/(314) 263-4802)

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Dave Chen

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(301) 227-2051

 

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 26 – OGIC POLICY MEMORANDUMS

In addition to the information contained herein, the Associate Director, OGIC, will provide policies, procedures, and templates that will support the contracting process as provided in the following pages in this Section.

OGIC Policy Memo Table of Contents

Policy Memo # Subject Date Page Number

001 Notification to PCM of Late 12 Apr 00 26-2

Contractor Deliveries and/or

Unacceptable Work

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Jim Sippel

Organization

OGIC

Phone Number

(301) 227-2734

 

 

OGIC 12 April 00

MEMORANDUM FOR: OGIC CORs, OGIC Branch Chiefs, OGIC Team Leads, OGIC Project Leads

SUBJECT: OGIC Policy Memo #001

  1. The following guidelines will be used for notifying the Procurement and Contracts Office(PCM)of late contractor deliveries and/or unacceptable work that must be returned to the contractor for correction:
  2. a. Late deliveries: CORs must notify the CO prior to the actual delivery date. This will allow OGIC/PC to negotiate a new delivery schedule with consideration. With no prior notice the COR will notify the Lead COR and the Project Leader on the first day that a deliverable is late. It is the Lead COR’s responsibility to notify the Contracting Officer/Specialist in writing on that same day and provide any information addressing causative factors for the performance schedules slippage. Neither the COR nor the Lead COR are to discuss delaying the delivery or extending the due date of this delivery with the contractor. It is the Contracting Officer’s/Specialist’s responsibility to contact the contractor in regards to this deliverable, and to keep the Lead COR informed of what action is being taken.

    b. Unacceptable Deliverables: Upon learning that a deliverable is determined to be unacceptable and must be returned to the contractor for rework, the COR will notify the Lead COR and the Project Leader immediately. The work should be returned in a timely manner to the contractor at this time by the COR, but the COR is at no time to discuss orally or in writing with the contractor a new date for submission of the reworked data. It is the Lead COR’s responsibility to notify the Contracting Officer/Specialist on the same day, and arrange to discuss the best course of action for this deliverable. After determining the best course of action for the unacceptable data, it is the Contracting Officer’s/Specialist’s responsibility to discuss this matter with the contractor. The Contract Officer/Specialist relay the outcome of this discussion back to the Lead COR.

    c. Management Notification of Unacceptable Contractor Performance: It is the COR’s responsibility to notify his Team Lead and Branch Chief of any contractor performance that has been consistently unacceptable. After all measures have been taken by the COR, Team Lead, and Branch Chief to rectify the situation and the unacceptable performance persists, the issue needs to be raised to the OGIC Associate Director. The OGIC Associate Director, in conjunction with the PCM Contracting Officer and General Council (GC), will determine the course of action to be taken before any formal contractual response is provide to the Contractor. The CORs will report consistent unacceptable performance to the Branch Chief and in turn to the OGIC Associate Director at the Monthly Production Briefing or a special session with the Associate Director as required.

  3. As a reminder to all, at no time will CORs discuss with contractors any actions that fall under the legal responsibilities of the Contract Officer, i.e. change the Statement of Work, approve additional work to be performed, discuss delays or extensions of deliveries, or discuss additional money for work performed. Please refer all contract related questions to the Lead COR and Contract officer. As a course of normal business the CORs do have the responsibility to provide the contractor with continuous feedback on issues and concerns that may effect cost, schedule, or performance.

3. Refer any questions you may have to your Branch Chief.

 

 

 

PAUL R. WEISE

Associate Director

Contract Production Division

CC:

PCM

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 27 – OGIC STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs)

In addition to the information contained herein, the Associate Director, OGIC, will provide Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that will support OGIC operations and the contracting process as provided in the following pages in this Section.

OGIC Standard Operating Procedure Table of Contents

Subject Date Page Number

SOP for Using the Omnibus Past 14 Nov 99 Available On-Line

Performance Database (See Section 12 of this Handbook)

SOP for OGIC Trip Reports April 2000 27-2

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Jim Sippel

Organization

OGIC

Phone Number

(301) 227-2734

 

 

Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)

For

OGIC Trip Reports

April 2000

  1. Purpose
  2. The purpose of this SOP is to provide the procedures and instructions for handling Trip Reports within OGIC.

  3. Background.
  4. OGIC personnel and the support personnel from the production departments perform extensive travel to support the contract production program.

    Trip Reports will document the significant events of the trip; particularly the decisions made between contractor and government and the actions taken by contractor and government. These decisions and actions need to be documented in trip reports.

  5. Procedures and instructions.

3.1 The Who.

The responsibility for Trip Reports lies with the COR. The COR can certainly delegate the actual writing of the Trip Report to the technical support personnel who do the travel, but it will be the COR who follows through with the review, coordination, and distribution. The trip report review will be performed by the COR since the Trip Report will be distributed to the contractor. The coordination will be among the writer, the COR, and the Team Lead. Final distribution will be to the Contracting Officer, Project Lead, other same product CORs, Team Lead, Team Chiefs, and contractor. Team Chiefs can forward to all appropriate technical support personnel.

3.2 The What.

A recommended format is given below.

    1. Purpose
    2. Reviewers, Contractor, Dates

    3. Summary
    4. Positives
    5. Issues/Concerns
    6. Action Items

3.3 The When.

Trip reports in most cases need to be timely since they capture decisions and actions. The Trip Report should be completed and distributed within seven calendar days after completion of trip.

3.4 The Where.

It is suggested that the trip reports be written from daily notes taken by the COR and/or the technical support personnel.

 

 

  1. Summary.

Adherence to this SOP will ensure a consistent handling and processing Trip Reports within OGIC.

 

 

 

Signed ___________________________________________

Paul R. Weise

Associate Director

Contract Production Division

 

Trip Report

  1. Purpose
  2. This trip was an FFD technical matrix visit to ESRI, October 25-29, 1999. NIMA personnel were Robb Blackburn, Roger Burlingame, and Larry McDurfee (COR). ESRI employees were Mike Money, Dave Altergott, and Glenn Hill.

  3. Summary
  4. The review of features for FFD cell 41N 113W was completed in SocetSet workstations. Calls were made to the report file with NIMA and ESRI getting printouts. The cell was not completely finished due to ESRI needing guidance on extracting the Great Salt Lake boundary with its interface with LSI and dry lake. After NIMA guidance the cell was reviewed.

  5. Positives
  1. Issues/Concerns
  2. Some hanging roads were noted. After NIMA guidance explaining only roads to areas of high interest were needed, most were deleted.

  3. Action Items

It was noted that the image dates were not available to ESRI for inputting into lineage.doc and dqarea.aft. Larry McDurfee will act on this.

 

 

 

 

 

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 28 – ACRONYMS

ACDP Acquisition Career Development Program

ACPB Acquisition Career Program Board

ACPM Acquisition Career Program Manager

ADRG ARC Digitized Raster Graphics

AF Air Force

AP Analysis and Plans Office

AT200 Air Target 1:200,000 Scale

BES Best Estimate Submission

BET Bethesda, Maryland

BOA Basic Ordering Agreement

CAE Component Acquisition Executive

CDRL Contract Data Requirements List

CIB Controlled Image Base

CIP Continuous Improvement Process

CO Contracting Officer

COR Contracting Officer’s Representative

CST Central Standard Time

CST Customer Support Team

DAU Defense Acquisition University

DAWIA Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act

DCI Director of Central Intelligence

DFAD Digital Feature Analysis Data

DNC Digital Nautical Chart

DO Imagery and Geospatial Operations Directorate

DOD Department of Defense

DPG Defense Planning Guidance

DPPDB Digital Point Positioning Data Base

DTED Digital Terrain Elevation Data

DTED2 Digital Terrain Elevation Data Level 2

e.g. Example

EIS Enhanced Imagery System

EST Eastern Standard Time

FAR Federal Acquisition Regulation

FFD Foundation Feature Data

FIT Foundation Implementation Team

FLIP Flight Information Publication

FOIA Freedom of Information Act

GC Office of General Counsel

G&G Geodesy and Geophysics

GNC Global Navigation Chart

GS General Schedule

HAC House Appropriations Committee

HASC House Armed Services Committee

HPSCI House Permanent Select on Intelligence

IDIQ Indefinite-Delivery/Indefinite-Quantity

IDPP Individual Development Program Plan

i.e. In Example

INTEL Intelligence

IOI Item of Interest

ISSO Information System Security Officer

ITD Interim Terrain Data

JID Job Identification

JNC Jet Navigation Chart

JOG Joint Operations Graphic

JOG-A Joint Operations Graphic - Air

MPAR Monthly Production Briefing

NAC NIMA Acquisition Center

NIMA National Imagery and Mapping Agency

NIMC National Imagery and Mapping College

NITF National Imagery Transmission Format

NOC-B NIMA Operations Center - Bethesda

NPP NIMA Production Prototype

NTM National Technical Means

OGE Office of Government Ethics

OGI Office of Geospatial Information and Services Office

OGIC Office of Geospatial Information Contract Production Division
OGID Office of Geospatial Information Data Generation Division

OGIR Office of Geospatial Regional Division

OMB Office of Management and Budget

ONC Operational Navigation Chart

OPS Operations

OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense

PC Procurement and Contracts Office

PCM Procurement and Contracts in Support of Operations Directorate

PCO Plans and Customer Operations Directorate

PCP Procurement and Contracts Policy, Technology, and Legislated

Programs Division

PDM Program Decision Memorandum

PM/S Production Management System

POC Point of Contact

POM Program Objective Memorandum

PPAIS Past Performance Automated Information System

PPBS Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System

PPI Past Performance Information

R&D Research and Development

RAS Regional Area Specialist

RFP Request for Proposal

SAC Senate Appropriations Committee

SASC Senate Armed Services Committee

SCO Single Color Overprint

SecDef Secretary of Defense

SOP Standard Operating Procedures

SOW Statement of Work

SRTM Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

SSCI Senate Select on Intelligence

STL St. Louis, Missouri

TEM Technical Evaluation Meeting

TLM Topographic Line Map

TLM 1:50 Topographic Line Map 1:50,000 Scale

TLM 1:100 Topographic Line Map 1:100,000 Scale

TOD Tactical Ocean Data

TPC Tactical Pilotage Chart

U.S. United States

USD(AT&L) Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and

Logistics

UVMAP Urban Vector Smart Map

UVMAP1 Urban Vector Smart Map Level 1

VJOG Vector Joint Operations Graphic

VMAP Vector Smart Map

VMAP0 Vector Smart Map Level 0

VMAP1 Vector Smart Map Level 1

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Paulette Martin

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 156

CONTRACT PRODUCTION ACQUISITION HANDBOOK

SECTION 29 – DEFINITIONS AND TERMINOLOGY

Term

Definition

Acquisition

Acquiring by contract with appropriated funds of supplies or services (including construction) by and for the use of the Federal Government through purchase or lease, whether the supplies or services are already in existence or must be created, developed, demonstrated, and evaluated. Acquisition begins at the point when agency needs are established and includes the description of requirements to satisfy agency needs, solicitation and selection of sources, award of contracts, contract financing, contract performance, contract administration, and those technical and management functions directly related to the process of fulfilling agency needs by contract.

Appropriation

Congressional action that created budget authority for and sets spending limits on all discretionary programs authorized in the authorization stage of the congressional budget process. Determines how much each authorized program is to receive in the final approved budget.

Authorization

The phase of the congressional budget process during which authorizing committees hold hearings, perform mark-ups, and recommend to the full House or Senate which activities should be funded within the federal departments over whose budget they (i.e., the committees) hold jurisdiction. Determines which programs and activities requested by the President will be authorized.

Budget Authority (BA)

Legal authority to obligate federal funds. BA, which is created by appropriations, allows federal agencies to sign contracts for the delivery of goods and services. Once these contracts are fulfilled and payments are made out to the Treasury, an outlay is created.

Budget Execution

The process through which the budget authority contained in appropriations is liquidated and federal funds are outlayed to pay for the operations of authorized federal activities. The actual process of incurring obligations and making payments out of the Treasury.

Budget Resolution

The first phase of the congressional budget process, which culminates with the passage of the Concurrent Budget Resolution. Sets overall spending limits on major categories of outlays.

Concurrent Budget Resolution

Legislation passed by both houses of Congress, but not signed by the President, which establishes revenue targets for the budget year and outyears and sets overall limits on major categories of discretionary federal spending for authorizing and appropriating committees to use during their deliberations on the budget.

Contracting Authority

Includes authority to negotiate and enter into contracts, issue change orders, negotiate equitable adjustments, terminate contracts, and to perform other major contracting duties. With NIMA, the Senior Procurement Executive has been empowered by the Director to issue Certificates of Appointments (warrants) which delegate contracting authority to specified individuals, called Contracting Officers.

Contracting Officer

Personnel within the Procurement and Contracts Office (PC), with the specific written authority to enter into, administer, or terminate contracts and make related determinations and findings. Any unauthorized commitment by a Government employee other than the Contracting Officer, or commitment made by a Contracting Officer beyond the extent of actual authority granted by the warrant, may not be reimbursed by the Government.

Contracting Officer’s Representative

Primary liaison between the contractor and the Contracting Officer. CORs have no authority other than that which has been delegated to them in writing by the Contracting Officer. A COR is nominated by the cognizant technical/requirements management to be responsible for assessment of the technical portion of a contract for the Contracting Officer. Successful completion of an approved COR training program is required in order to be appointed a COR.

General Counsel/Legal Counsel

Provides legal advice and assistance throughout the acquisition process to ensure compliance with applicable laws, executive orders, regulations and procedures, and represents the Agency in the event of protests, court appearances, and appeals.

President’s Budget

The President’s annual funding proposal to Congress. It consists of a consolidated funding request from all executive departments and agencies, including DOD and the Intelligence agencies, and projections for entitlements, interest payments, and any federal funds that will be needed to cover losses to federal deposit insurance funds. The President’s budget is the Federal Government budget for a particular fiscal year. The President transmits the budget to Congress on the first Monday in February in accordance with the Budget Enforcement Act.

Request for Proposal

A comprehensive document that defines what, how, when, who, where, for how much, and the consequences of failure to deliver or perform. As an evaluation tool, the RFP compares vendor offerings and should be considered part of the document trail that leads to a legal contract. A properly constructed RFP draws out the needed data for the team to make a good decision with minimal vendor interaction.

 

Statement of Work

A SOW establishes and defines the tasks the contractor is to perform. Tasks may be defined as objectives or goals, qualitatively and quantitatively, as an off-the-shelf item.

 

Point of Contact:

Name

Paulette Martin

Organization

OGICM

Phone Number

(314) 263-4802 ext. 156