Office of the Under Secretary of the Treasury for Enforcement

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Office of the Under Secretary of the Treasury for Enforcement

The Treasury Department is the oldest American law enforcement agency. Since 1789, The Department of the Treasury has collected revenues, formulated economic policy, and through Federal law enforcement personnel, plays a leading role in enforcing its laws and protecting the safety of US citizens and institutions.

Treasury Enforcement is headed by the Under Secretary of the Treasury for Enforcement, whose office provides policy oversight for all the Treasury Enforcement components. The Under Secretary for Enforcement has oversight authority over all components with the exception of the IRS Criminal Investigation Division, for which it provides policy guidance. His staff is complimented by an Assistant Secretary & Deputy Assistant Secretaries.

Treasury Enforcement has four of the nation's eight largest Federal law enforcement agencies. The U.S. Customs Service was established in 1789 to collect tariff revenues. The U.S. Secret Service was created in 1865 to combat currency counterfeiting. In 1901, the agency's charter was increased to include protective responsibilities for the President, and later the Vice President and visiting world leaders. Its investigative authority has also been enhanced to include a variety of financial crimes, including but not limited to, access device fraud, false ID, and computer related crimes. In 1940, President Roosevelt created the predecessor to the Office of Foreign Assets Control, which today targets the transactions and assets of terrorists and narcotics traffickers as well as countries posing a threat to US national security and economy, The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) was created in 1972. However, ATF originated as an IRS unit responsible for collecting liquor taxes. In addition to its extensive firearms, arson and explosive law enforcement responsibilities, ATF now collects revenue levied against alcohol, tobacco and firearms. In 1970, Congress created the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center to provide training for federal, state, local and international law enforcement. In 1990, The Financial Crime Enforcement Network (FinCEN) was created to provide a central source for analysis and intelligence to support the detection, investigation, and prosecution of money laundering and other financial crimes. In 1994, FinCEN's mission was broadened to include regulatory responsibility under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA)

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Updated Saturday, August 29, 1998 4:42:40 PM