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PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATION

 

 

ITEM SPECIFICATION

FOR THE

VERTICAL TAKEOFF AND LANDING TACTICAL UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE

(VTUAV)

 

 

 

 

 

Prepared for:

Program Manager

Navy Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Program

PMA-263

 

 

 

Prepared by:

VTUAV Spec Development Team

PMA-263 / AIR-4.1.1.5

47123 Buse Road

Patuxent River, MD 20670

 

 

SUBMITTED BY:

   

Date:

30 Aug 99

 

Richard Brasel, Commander, USN

     
 

VTUAV APMSE

     

AIR-4.1.1.5

     

APPROVED FOR USE AS THE FUNCTIONAL BASELINE:

   

Date:


30 Aug 99

 

Lynden Whitmer, Captain, USN

     
 

VTUAV Program Manager

     
 

PMA-263

     

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1 SCOPE *

1.1 Identification. *

1.2 Entity Description. *

2 APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS *

2.1 Government Documents. *

2.1.1 Specifications, Standards, and Handbooks. *

2.1.2 Other Government Documents, Drawings, and Publications. *

2.2 General Documents. *

2.3 Order of Precedence. *

3 REQUIREMENTs *

3.1 System Definition. *

3.1.1 VTUAV System Overview. *

3.1.1.1 Mission Objective. *

3.1.1.2 Operational Strategy. *

3.1.1.3 Design Strategy. *

3.2 Characteristics. *

3.2.1 System Component Descriptions. *

3.2.1.1 Air Vehicle (AV). *

3.2.1.2 Modular Mission Payloads (MMP). *

3.2.1.3 Ground Control Station (GCS). *

3.2.1.4 Data Link Suite (DLS). *

3.2.1.5 Remote Data Terminal (RDT). *

3.2.2 Functional Configuration. *

3.2.2.1 USN Configurations. *

3.2.2.1.1 USN Sea-Based. *

3.2.2.1.2 USN Land-Based. *

3.2.2.2 USMC Configurations. *

3.2.3 External Interfaces. *

3.2.4 Internal Interfaces. *

3.2.5 Performance Characteristics. *

3.2.5.1 System Operations. *

3.2.5.1.1 Mission Capability Requirements. *

3.2.5.1.2 System Computations. *

3.2.5.1.3 Target Location Accuracy. *

3.2.5.1.4 Mission Planning. *

3.2.5.1.4.1 Pre-Flight Programming. *

3.2.5.1.4.2 In-Flight Programming. *

3.2.5.1.5 System Control. *

3.2.5.1.5.1 Launch & Recovery. *

3.2.5.1.5.2 Command & Control Hand-off. *

3.2.5.1.5.3 Simultaneous Operations. *

3.2.5.1.6 VTUAV System Communications. *

3.2.5.1.7 Embedded Operational Training Functions. *

3.2.5.1.7.1 TCS Utilization. *

3.2.5.2 System Compatibility. *

3.2.5.2.1 Shipboard Requirements *

3.2.5.2.1.1 Automatic Launch & Recovery. *

3.2.5.2.1.2 Deck Restraining and Storage. *

3.2.5.2.1.3 Deck Size. *

3.2.5.2.1.4 Fueling. *

3.2.5.2.2 VTUAV System Preparation Time. *

3.2.5.2.2.1 Set-Up Times. *

3.2.5.2.2.2 Preparation for Transportation Times. *

3.2.5.2.2.3 Launch and Recovery Time. *

3.2.5.2.3 UAV to UAV System Interoperability. *

3.2.5.2.4 Environmental Impact. *

3.2.5.2.5 VTUAV System Survivability. *

3.2.5.2.6 Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Contamination. *

3.2.5.2.7 Electrical Power. *

3.2.5.2.7.1 Emergency Power. *

3.2.5.2.8 Shipboard Environment. *

3.2.5.2.9 Human Engineering. *

3.2.5.3 Environmental Conditions. *

3.2.5.3.1 Ambient Temperature. *

3.2.5.3.1.1 Operational Temperature Extremes. *

3.2.5.3.1.2 Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit. *

3.2.5.3.1.3 Operational Temperature Shock. *

3.2.5.3.2 Humidity. *

3.2.5.3.3 Rain. *

3.2.5.3.3.1 Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit. *

3.2.5.3.4 Snow. *

3.2.5.3.4.1 Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit. *

3.2.5.3.4.2 Operating. *

3.2.5.3.5 Icing. *

3.2.5.3.5.1 Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit. *

3.2.5.3.5.2 Operating. *

3.2.5.3.6 Wind. *

3.2.5.3.7 Fungus. *

3.2.5.3.8 Salt Fog. *

3.2.5.3.9 Blowing Sand and Dust. *

3.2.5.3.10 Altitudes. *

3.2.5.3.10.1 Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit. *

3.2.5.3.10.2 Operating. *

3.2.5.3.11 Solar Radiation. *

3.2.5.3.12 Induced Environment. *

3.2.5.3.13 Vibration. *

3.2.5.3.14 Mechanical Shock. *

3.2.5.3.15 Acceleration. *

3.2.5.4 System Reliability, Availability, Maintainability (RAM). *

3.2.5.4.1 Reliability. *

3.2.5.4.1.1 System Reliability. *

3.2.5.4.1.2 Deleted. *

3.2.5.4.2 Availability. *

3.2.5.4.3 Maintainability. *

3.2.5.4.3.1 Mean Flight Hours Between Unscheduled Maintenance Actions. *

3.2.5.4.3.2 Mean-Time-To-Repair. *

3.2.5.4.3.3 Independence of Failures. *

3.2.5.4.4 System Diagnostics. *

3.2.5.4.4.1 Built-In-Test (BIT) Capabilities. *

3.2.5.4.4.2 BIT Fault Detection Rate. *

3.2.5.4.4.3 BIT Fault Isolation Rate. *

3.2.5.4.4.4 BIT False Alarms. *

3.2.5.4.5 Preventive/Scheduled Maintenance (Organizational Level or On-Site/On-Equipment). *

3.2.5.5 Transportability. *

3.2.5.5.1 Ground Transportability. *

3.2.5.5.2 Rail Transportability. *

3.2.5.5.3 Air Transportability. *

3.2.5.5.4 Marine Transportability. *

3.3 Material Definition. *

3.3.1 Materials. *

3.3.1.1 Hazardous, Toxic and Ozone Depleting Chemicals Prevention. *

3.3.1.2 Materials Producibility. *

3.3.1.3 Materials Inspectability. *

3.3.1.4 Materials Repairability. *

3.3.1.5 Recycled, Recovered, or Environmentally Preferable Materials. *

3.3.2 Computer Hardware and Software. *

3.3.2.1 Computer Hardware Requirements. *

3.3.2.1.1 Data Storage and Main Memory Reserve Capacity. *

3.3.2.1.2 Processing Speed/Throughout Reserve Capacity. *

3.3.2.1.3 Input / Output (I/O) Channel Requirements. *

3.3.2.1.4 Processor and Firmware Enhancements. *

3.3.2.2 Computer Software. *

3.3.2.2.1 Firmware. *

3.3.2.2.2 Programming Languages. *

3.3.2.2.3 Commenting Standards. *

3.3.2.2.4 Error and Diagnostic Messages. *

3.3.2.2.5 Character Set Standards. *

3.3.2.2.6 Software Security. *

3.3.2.2.7 Fault Tolerance. *

3.3.2.2.8 Computer Program Regeneration. *

3.3.3 Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3). *

3.3.3.1 Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). *

3.3.3.2 Electromagnetic Vulnerability (EMV) *

3.3.3.3 Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). *

3.3.3.4 Electromagnetic Radiation Hazards (HERP, HERF, HERO). *

3.3.3.5 Electrostatic Discharge (ESD). *

3.3.3.6 TEMPEST. *

3.3.4 Safety. *

3.3.4.1 System Safety. *

3.3.4.2 Safety Provisions. *

3.4 Logistics. *

3.4.1 Support Equipment. *

3.5 Characteristics of System Elements. *

3.5.1 Air Vehicle. *

3.5.1.1 Design Life. *

3.5.1.2 AV Performance. *

3.5.1.2.1 Flight Profile. *

3.5.1.2.2 Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) Operations. *

3.5.1.2.2.1 Shipboard Compatibility. *

3.5.1.2.2.1.1 Deck Spotting, Storage, and Accessibility. *

3.5.1.2.2.1.2 Tip-back and Turnover. *

3.5.1.2.3 Service Ceiling. *

3.5.1.2.4 Airspeed. *

3.5.1.2.5 Weight. *

3.5.1.2.5.1 Weight Variations. *

3.5.1.2.6 AV Position Accuracy. *

3.5.1.2.7 Handling Qualities. *

3.5.1.2.7.1 AV Launch and Recovery. *

3.5.1.2.7.2 Autonomous Emergency Recovery. *

3.5.1.2.7.3 Wave-off. *

3.5.1.2.7.4 Flight Outside the Flight Envelope. *

3.5.1.2.7.5 Transfer of Flight Control Modes. *

3.5.1.2.8 AV Environmental Conditions. *

3.5.1.2.8.1 Temperature Extremes. *

3.5.1.2.8.2 Rain. *

3.5.1.2.8.3 Icing. *

3.5.1.2.8.4 Vibration. *

3.5.1.2.9 AV Modes of Operation. *

3.5.1.2.9.1 In-Flight Operations. *

3.5.1.3 AV Functional Requirements. *

3.5.1.3.1 Air Vehicle Data Link. *

3.5.1.3.2 Embedded Voice Communications Relay. *

3.5.1.3.3 Identification Friend or Foe (IFF). *

3.5.1.3.4 Locator Beacon. *

3.5.1.3.5 Battle Group Inter-Operability. *

3.5.1.3.6 Navigation Lights. *

3.5.1.3.7 Navigation. *

3.5.1.3.8 MMP Provisions. *

3.5.1.3.9 AV Servicing. *

3.5.1.3.9.1 Ground Operation Provisions. *

3.5.2 Modular Mission Payload (MMP). *

3.5.2.1 Initial MMP. *

3.5.2.2 Flight Operation. *

3.5.2.3 Payload Tracking and Pointing. *

3.5.2.3.1 Automatic Tracking. *

3.5.2.3.2 Geographic Pointing. *

3.5.2.3.3 Fixed Pointing. *

3.5.2.4 Payload Control. *

3.5.2.5 Data Display. *

3.5.2.6 MMP Cooling System. *

3.5.2.7 Sensor Metadata. *

3.5.2.8 MMP Interfaces. *

3.5.3 Ground Control Station (GCS). *

3.5.3.1 GCS Architecture. *

3.5.3.2 Environmental Conditions. *

3.5.3.2.1 Rain Operating Conditions. *

3.5.3.2.2 Wind. *

3.5.3.2.3 Icing. *

3.5.3.3 GCS Communications. *

3.5.3.3.1 Ground System Communications. *

3.5.3.4 GCS Data Recording. *

3.5.3.5 General Physical Characteristics for GCS Shelters. *

3.5.3.5.1 Shelter Characteristics. *

3.5.3.5.1.1 Climatic Control. *

3.5.3.5.1.2 Environmental Control. *

3.5.3.5.2 Electrical Power. *

3.5.3.5.3 Lightning Protection. *

3.5.4 Remote Data Terminal (RDT). *

3.5.4.1 Mission. *

3.5.4.2 RDT Configuration. *

3.5.4.3 Environment. *

3.5.4.4 RDT BIT. *

3.5.4.5 Information Interface. *

3.5.4.6 Electrical Power Interface. *

3.5.4.7 Physical Characteristics. *

3.5.5 Data Link Suite (DLS). *

3.5.5.1 General Description. *

3.5.5.2 Data Link Suite Performance. *

3.5.5.2.1 Primary Data Link. *

3.5.5.2.2 Secondary Data Link. *

3.5.5.2.3 GDT Performance. *

3.5.5.2.3.1 GDT Power Requirements. *

3.5.5.2.4 ADT Performance. *

4 VERIFICATION *

4.1 Methods of Verification. *

4.2 Classification of Verification. *

4.3 Inspection Facilities and Equipment. *

4.4 Test Plans, Methods, and Procedures. *

4.5 Detailed Verification Requirements. *

4.5.1 Environmental Verification. *

4.5.1.1 Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Requirements. *

4.5.1.1.1 E3 Facilities. *

4.5.1.1.2 COTS and NDI. *

5 PACKAGING *

6 NOTES *

6.1 Intended Use. *

6.2 Objectives. *

APPENDIX A *

  1. SCOPE
    1. Identification.
    2. This specification establishes the performance, test and verification requirements for the Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System, hereinafter referred to as the VTUAV System, RQ-X.

    3. Entity Description.

    The VTUAV System is intended to be a replacement for the Pioneer System. A system consists of these basic elements: Air Vehicles (AV), Ground Control Stations (GCS), Data Link Suite (DLS), Remote Data Terminals (RDT), and Modular Mission Payloads (MMP).

    The VTUAV is a naval aircraft system employed by both the Navy and Marine Corps. For the Navy, it will be deployed similar to the embarked LAMPS MK III detachments on surface combatants. On the surface combatants the VTUAV System may be combined with the LAMPS MK III detachment or deployed as a standalone detachment. For the Marines it will be employed by the Air Combat Element (ACE) of the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) in the amphibious task force, both ashore and afloat.

    The VTUAV will be an integrated component of the MAGTF and shipboard weapon systems. During amphibious assaults, the VTUAV data will be used in mission planning for embarked marines and to re-direct units in real time for those missions executed. For surface combatants, the VTUAV will become an integral part of the ship’s weapon systems. The VTUAV will provide real time targeting for naval guns and missiles. In addition, the VTUAV data will support targeting for the full range of air delivered weapons.

    VTUAV support will extend beyond the organic unit operating the system. Through the UAV control consoles, the UAV data will be linked through the existing C4I network to an extended group of users.

  2. APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS
    1. Government Documents.
      1. Specifications, Standards, and Handbooks.
      2. The following specifications, standards, and handbooks are referred to in this specification. Unless otherwise specified, the issues of these documents are those listed in the Department of Defense Index of Specifications and Standards (DoDISS).

        TITLE

         

        NUMBER

         

        Environmental Engineering Considerations & Laboratory Tests

         

        MIL-STD-810

         

        Measurement of EMI Characteristics

         

        MIL-STD-462

         

        Interface Standard, Electromagnetic Environmental Effects

         

        MIL-STD-464

         

        Electromagnetic Emission and Susceptibility Requirements for the Control of Electromagnetic Interference

         

        MIL-STD-461

         

        System Safety Program Requirements

         

        MIL-STD-882

         

         

      3. Other Government Documents, Drawings, and Publications.

      The following documents listed herein are referred to in this specification. These documents should provide programmatic, systems, and operational information and, hence, should serve for informational and guidance purposes only.

      TITLE

       

      NUMBER

      DATE

      Operational Requirements Document for the Vertical Takeoff and landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV)

       

      JROCM 04-99

      13 Jan 1999

      Operational Requirements Document for the Tactical Control Stations (TCS)

       

      JROC 011-97

      3 Feb 1997

      Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV) Concept of Employment (CoE)

       

      Draft G

      1 Jun 1999

      Acquisition Logistics Support Specification Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV)

       

      ALSS-263-01

      30 Aug 1999

    2. General Documents.
    3. The following document listed herein are referred to in this specification. This document should provide programmatic, systems, and operational information and, hence, should serve for informational and guidance purposes only.

      TITLE

       

      NUMBER

      DATE

      Common Imagery Ground/Surface System (CIGSS) Acquisition Handbook

       

      Version 2.0, Volume I Standards, Third Draft

      11 April 1997

    4. Order of Precedence.

    In the event of a conflict between the text of this specification and the references cited herein, the text of this specification takes precedence. Nothing in this specification, however, supersedes applicable laws and regulations unless a specific exemption has been obtained.

  3. REQUIREMENTs
    1. System Definition.
    2. The VTUAV System is defined as all hardware and software necessary to meet the requirements of this section of the VTUAV System performance specification. A system consists of these basic elements: Air Vehicles (AV), Ground Control Stations (GCS), Data Link Suite (DLS), Remote Data Terminals (RDT), and Modular Mission Payloads (MMP). The exact configuration, quantity, and functional capability of these basic elements will depend on deployment scenario and on contractor design concepts used to meet the mission objectives.

      1. VTUAV System Overview.
      2. The VTUAV is a joint USN/USMC system to provide a Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) / Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) and communications relay capability in support of littoral operations as described in the white papers Forward from the Sea, and Operational Maneuver from the Sea (OMFTS). The Government envisions system improvement efforts during production to enhance system performance and to expand mission capabilities. Commanders will rely on the RSTA/ISR and communications relay capability provided by the VTUAV System to collect and pass information and data to support them in a number of varying operational scenarios. The VTUAV System therefore must be designed as a flexible, capable, re-configurable system that can be employed in support of these varying scenarios and is operable and maintainable in a combat environment. VTUAV performance requirements, such as air vehicle speed and endurance are driven by the tempo and depth of operations now expected to be attainable with the advent of such technologically advanced weapons systems such as: the AAAV, V-22, DD21 with AGS and AEGIS cruisers / destroyers with enhanced land attack capabilities. These systems, VTUAV included, are the technologies enabling the OMFTS.

        1. Mission Objective.
        2. The purpose of the VTUAV System is to collect and pass information utilizing an airborne sensor platform that will provide the battlefield commander an extended and enhanced battlespace situational awareness. The payloads that support these missions will evolve and mature over time. The VTUAV System must be interoperable with a wide variety of mission payloads. It is anticipated that this requirement will be met through a versatile set of physical, electrical, and data interfaces. The data interfaces will not only include interfaces within the VTUAV System, but also interfaces into the Command, Control, Communications, Computer and Intelligence (C4I) networks that should provide secondary distribution of the data to end users.

        3. Operational Strategy.
        4. The VTUAV System will be forward deployed with Navy and Marine Corps units both afloat and ashore. It should be capable of operating in the same environments as the Sailors and Marines operate within, and in concert with existing deployed weapons systems. These environments include locations world wide, day or night, and in weather conditions where the United States may require a power projection capability or engage in littoral operations. This also requires the system to operate in a very cluttered electromagnetic environment characteristic of a shipboard or battlefield environment. The system will operate from designated US Navy surface combatants, amphibious assault ships, and from unprepared land-based sites. The air vehicle must take-off and land vertically. The system must be capable of transferring command and control between controlling stations, both shipboard and in land based operations. In addition, the system will be set up, operated and maintained by Navy and Marine Corps personnel. As a deployable system it must be capable of extended operations without re-supply both ashore and afloat. Notional operations are shown in Figures (1) & (2).

           

        5. Design Strategy.

      The VTUAV System design should be of a modular nature that will facilitate reconfigurations to include or remove subsystem components, depending on the resources available to the parent unit and the operating environment. For example, modified ships will have VTUAV command and control functions incorporated in the ship’s combat system architecture, so the embarked VTUAV unit will not have to provide computer assets for air vehicle and payload control and monitoring, mission planning, and data exploitation. USMC VTUAV ground systems will require all the VTUAV System resources necessary to perform the mission and must be transportable by USMC organizational transportation assets.

      In order to support the operational tempo of the future the VTUAV System must provide autonomous operation with automatic features that allow for manual intervention on critical functions such as rapid re-tasking of the sensors, and mission planning. In order to interact or operate in concert with the amphibious task force, the VTUAV System must provide the system operators with tactical communications. For example, the operators in the ground control station need communications with such function centers as the Direct Air Support Center (DASC), the Fire Support Coordination Center (FSCC), and Supporting Arms Coordination Center (SACC).

      The government anticipates the VTUAV System to maximize the use of existing commercial & government systems and/or components. The VTUAV System will comply with the Joint Technical Architecture (JTA) and Defense Information Infrastructure (DII) Common Operating Environment (COE) requirements to support uniformity and interoperability.

       

    3. Characteristics.
    4. The VTUAV System performance characteristics delineated in Section 3 represent the minimum performance characteristics of the system. It is the intent of the Government to develop a VTUAV System that exceeds these characteristics wherever practical while keeping within the program’s Total Ownership Cost (TOC) goals and while maximizing the system’s capabilities. Section 6.2 delineates the objective characteristics which are desired by the Government. Where practical, the VTUAV System should satisfy the objective characteristics delineated in section 6.2. The Government intends to initiate a system improvement program to meet the objective characteristics not obtainable under this effort.

      1. System Component Descriptions.
      2. The VTUAV System consists of the following major elements.

        1. Air Vehicle (AV).
        2. The AV is the airborne element of the VTUAV System and carries the Mission Modular Payloads and embedded airborne communication relay.

        3. Modular Mission Payloads (MMP).
        4. The MMP are self-contained, plug and play elements that are designed to accomplish specific missions. MMP will be installed and uninstalled on the AV element dependent upon specific mission needs of the VTUAV System sortie.

        5. Ground Control Station (GCS).
        6. The VTUAV GCS facility contains the hardware and software for mission planning, AV and MMP command & control, and receipt and dissemination of imagery / data. The GCS serves as a command post and work area for imagery and data evaluation. The GCS shall(1) utilize the Tactical Control System (TCS) architecture to support accomplishments of these functions.

        7. Data Link Suite (DLS).
        8. The Data Link Suite (DLS) provides command, control, communications (C3), and data exchange between system operators, the AV, and the MMP. The data link suite contains a primary and a secondary data link. The primary link is a Tactical Common Data Link (TCDL). There are two (2) functional sub-elements of the data link suite:

          a) Ground Data Terminal (GDT)

          b) Airborne Data Terminal (ADT)

        9. Remote Data Terminal (RDT).

        The RDT provides the users with access to near real time payload imagery and data independent of the GCS.

      3. Functional Configuration.
      4. The baseline functions and equipment configurations of VTUAV System elements should be modular and can be interchanged and intermixed to meet specific service missions.

        1. USN Configurations.
        2. The USN system will be deployed in two different configurations: USN Sea-Based and USN Land-Based.

          1. USN Sea-Based.
          2. In this configuration, VTUAV System’s command and control functions are incorporated and integrated into the ships’ internal command and control system. These ship’s command and control systems shall(1) provide the data link and the ground control functionality for command & control of the AV and MMP. The initial classes of VTUAV capable ships and their TCS level of connectivity are:

            Ship Class

            TCS Level of Connectivity

            DDG-51

            5

            CG-47

            5

            DD-21

            5

            LPD-17

            5

            LHA-1

            5

            LHD-1

            5

             

          3. USN Land-Based.

          The USN Land-Based VTUAV System will be used for training, land-based exercises, and deployments aboard ships not modified with an integrated DLS or GCS. The VTUAV System components shall(1) provide all functionality for command & control of the AVs and MMPs.

        3. USMC Configurations.

        The USMC VTUAV System elements will be transportable by High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV) and shall(1) be capable of providing all functionality for command & control of the AVs and MMPs.

      5. External Interfaces.
      6. The VTUAV System shall(1) support existing USN and USMC system interfaces and implement an open systems architecture that supports and utilizes DII COE objectives. The VTUAV System should possess standard communication interfaces; including standard peripheral ports, and be interoperable with:

        a) All C4I interfaces specified by the TCS ORD.

        b) Standard meteorological information from the appropriate aviation command element or ship's weather department.

      7. Internal Interfaces.
      8. The VTUAV System shall(1) be defined through a set of Interface Control Documents (ICDs). These interfaces should utilize commercial and non-commercial interface standards and support an open systems architecture. The ICDs represent the functional and physical interfaces between system elements and sub-elements. These ICDs define the functional, hardware, and software boundaries between major functional sub-elements. The ICDs are expected to evolve during detailed design of the VTUAV System with the purpose of facilitating the replacement of obsolete parts, upgrading components, and incorporation of additional system elements.

      9. Performance Characteristics.
      10. This section defines the performance characteristics of the VTUAV System. Specific system component performance characteristics are defined herein.

        1. System Operations.
          1. Mission Capability Requirements.
          2. The VTUAV System shall(1) provide for 12 continuous hours of Time On Station (TOS) within a 24-hour period at maximum mission radius.

          3. System Computations.
          4. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of supporting computations for operations at altitudes ranging from –500ft Mean Sea level (MSL) to greater than 20,000ft MSL.

          5. Target Location Accuracy.
          6. The VTUAV System shall(1) provide a target location to the users with a Target Location Error (TLE) of less than or equal to (<) 25 meters (m) Spherical Error Probable (SEP) at 6km slant range.

          7. Mission Planning.
            1. Pre-Flight Programming.
            2. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of programming the AV and MMP elements with mission planning data prior to launch.

            3. In-Flight Programming.

            The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of re-planning the AV and/or MMP mission from the controlling GCS while the air vehicle is in flight.

          8. System Control.
            1. Launch & Recovery.
            2. An Automatic Launch and Recovery Capability shall(1) be the primary means of launching and recovering the air vehicle. The VTUAV System shall(2) be able to override the Automatic Launch and Recovery capability and revert to manual control for launch and recovery. The VTUAV System shall(3) be able to command the AV to abort the automatic takeoff or landing sequence with execution of a pre-programmed wave-off flight routine.

            3. Command & Control Hand-off.
            4. The VTUAV System shall(1) be able to hand-off control of an AV and/or MMP from one VTUAV GCS to another VTUAV GCS.

            5. Simultaneous Operations.

            The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of simultaneously operating two AVs, one or more MMP, and the embedded communication relay during a single mission sortie. The GCS shall(2) have the capability to simultaneously control the AV and MMP while also performing mission planning.

          9. VTUAV System Communications.
          10. The VTUAV System shall(1) have communication controls which permit each operator to select two-way voice communications using any of the system’s external wire lines, radio sets, or intercoms, and then to communicate with other operators, and with Air Traffic Control (ATC) authority.

          11. Embedded Operational Training Functions.
          12. The VTUAV System will possess an embedded training capability to provide operational training via the GCS.

            1. TCS Utilization.

          The embedded operational training functions should be compatible with the TCS system’s training capabilities.

        2. System Compatibility.
          1. Shipboard Requirements
            1. Automatic Launch & Recovery.
            2. The Automatic Launch and Recovery Capability shall(1) be able to launch and recover AVs which possesses performance characteristics delineated in paragraph 3.5.1.2.2.1 Shipboard Compatibility, from VTUAV capable ships. Landing dispersion (3 sigma) should not exceed 12 ft radius (shipboard touchdown circle radius) while subject to ship air-wake with a mean wind-over-deck of at least 25 knots from all azimuths under ship motion conditions up to ± 50 pitch and ± 80 roll.

            3. Deck Restraining and Storage.
            4. The VTUAV System shall(1) possess a deck restraining and an all weather storage capability compatible with all VTUAV capable ships. This capability includes restraining the air vehicle during pre-launch and post-recovery as well as any other conditions which the VTUAV System will encounter. VTUAV System’s maintenance space requirement shall(2) include stowage and traverse of air vehicle and associated support equipment for all VTUAV capable ships.

            5. Deck Size.
            6. The AV and associated launch and recovery equipment should be capable of launch and recovery functions within the operational boundaries of the VTUAV capable ship’s flight deck. The flight deck area of DDG-51 ships will be used for maintenance, stowage, and operations of the VTUAV System and should not interfere with other ship operations to include helicopter operations.

            7. Fueling.

            The VTUAV System shall(1) be compatible with all VTUAV capable ship aviation fueling systems.

          2. VTUAV System Preparation Time.
            1. Set-Up Times.
            2. A VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of being off-loaded from its transport vehicles and achieving, at a minimum, Mission Capable (MC) status, which is: one GCS, one AV, one DLS, and one MMP, within 60 minutes.

            3. Preparation for Transportation Times.
            4. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of being disassembled, made ready for transport, and reloaded aboard its ground transport vehicles within 60 minutes.

            5. Launch and Recovery Time.

            A VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of launching a single AV within 30 minutes of receipt of tasking, assuming prior airspace coordination and mission planning have been completed. The VTUAV System will be capable of being fully integrated into the shipboard flight operations typically associated with the launch and recovery of helicopters and other conventional/VTOL aircraft from all VTUAV capable class ships. The AV shall(2) be capable of launching within 10 minutes after being positioned on its launch point on the flight deck. Following its recovery, the AV shall(3) be capable of being moved from the flight deck to its storage point within 10 minutes.

          3. UAV to UAV System Interoperability.
          4. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of operating and/or interfacing with other fielded UAV systems, without causing mutual interference or operational degradation.

          5. Environmental Impact.
          6. The VTUAV System should have no adverse impact on the environment.

          7. VTUAV System Survivability.
          8. The VTUAV System shall(1) incorporate a balanced survivability design. The design should utilizing both vulnerability and susceptibility reduction techniques to enhance survivability, while performing the "Process Targets" naval mission tasking (OPNAVINST 3500.38/MCO 3500.26/USCG COMDTINST M3500.1 30 SEPTEMBER 1996, UNTL Section 3, NTA 3.1), in the low to medium intensity threat environments. This environment includes, but is not limited to, an air defense of:

            - light-medium AAA guns (small arms, S-60, 2S-6)

            - IR SAMs (SA-7, SA-13, SA-18, 2S-6, Stinger)

            - RF SAMs (SA-6, SA-8, Roland, SA-11, SA-15)

            Susceptibility reduction techniques should be utilized to limit exposure of the AV to the aforementioned threat weapon systems. Active and passive visual, acoustic, infrared (IR), and radar signatures of the VTUAV System (including components other than the AV) should be minimized. Vulnerability reduction techniques should be utilized to protect from, mitigate, or limit the effects of combat damage to components and subsystems essential for the safe return of the AV. Special considerations should be given to the VTUAV System’s impact on the host ship’s signature.

          9. Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Contamination.
          10. The VTUAV System and support equipment shall(1) be compatible with current individual protective equipment and capable of being operated, maintained, and re-supplied by personnel in Mission Oriented Protective Posture (MOPP) IV and be capable of being decontaminated with service standard decontamination equipment. The GCS shelters should contain provisions for radiological, biological, and chemical sensors to detect contamination outside the shelter.

          11. Electrical Power.
          12. Electrical power for the VTUAV System shall(1) be compatible with current naval shipboard and aircraft electrical systems, with standard DOD family of mobile electrical generations systems, and with standard worldwide commercial alternating current sources.

            1. Emergency Power.

            The VTUAV System shall(1) have sufficient backup electrical power to continue to operate the system to complete its mission and recover the air vehicles in the event of an electrical generation system failure.

          13. Shipboard Environment.
          14. The VTUAV System shall(1) operate successfully within the electromagnetic field associated on / within naval surface ships.

          15. Human Engineering.

          The VTUAV System shall(1) not cause any adverse effects on the operators or maintainers.

        3. Environmental Conditions.
          1. Ambient Temperature.
            1. Operational Temperature Extremes.
            2. Components of the VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives in temperatures between -20° F (-29° C) to 122° F (+50oC) for daily cycle (air temperature outside shelters with solar load of 355 BTU/sq. ft/hr).

            3. Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.
            4. The non-operating VTUAV System and equipment should withstand temperature extremes of -400F (-40° C) to 1600F (+71oC) .

            5. Operational Temperature Shock.

            The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) not suffer damage or subsequently fail to meet the VTUAV System’s mission objectives when subjected to abrupt temperature changes between -20° F (-29° C) to 122° F (+50oC).

          2. Humidity.
          3. The VTUAV System and maintenance equipment shall(1) be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives and sustain no physical damage during and after prolonged exposure to extreme high humidity levels for hot and basic categories, as encountered in tropical areas. Provisions should be made to prevent the excessive accumulation of moisture during ascent and descent in humid climates.

          4. Rain.
            1. Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.

            The VTUAV System, during non-operating, storage and transit, shall(1) not sustain any physical damage or be rendered inoperable following steady rainfall 2 inches per hour for a period of one hour.

          5. Snow.
            1. Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.
            2. The VTUAV System should withstand a snow load of 20 pounds per square-foot when in non-operating, storage or transit status.

            3. Operating.

            The VTUAV System should permit removal of snow prior to operation in 1.5 hours, after the system encounters a snow load of 10 pounds per square foot.

          6. Icing.
            1. Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.
            2. The VTUAV System should withstand an ice load of 20 pounds per square-foot when in a non-operating, storage or transit status.

            3. Operating.

            The VTUAV System should permit removal of ice prior to operation. The VTUAV System should be operational within 1.5 hours after this equipment encounters an ice load of 3 pounds per square foot.

          7. Wind.
          8. The VTUAV System when in a non-operating, storage, or transit status should not sustain any physical damage during steady winds of up to 45 knots for a period of 5 minutes with gusts up to 65 knots with two inches of radial glazed ice. Hold-down or other facilities should be provided to withstand winds above 55 knots for a period of 5 minutes with gusts to 85 knots.

          9. Fungus.
          10. The VTUAV System shall(1) not show evidence of deterioration and remain operable and storable within environments containing fungi to include: Chaetomium Globsum, Aspergillus Niger, Aspergillus Flavus, Aspergillus Versicolor, and Penicillium Funiculosum.

          11. Salt Fog.
          12. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of meeting its mission objectives and not sustain any physical or functional damage during and after exposure to the salt fog of naval environments.

          13. Blowing Sand and Dust.
          14. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of meeting its mission objectives and be protected and resistant to the degrading effects from and after exposure to sand and dust particles of all expected operating and storage environments.

          15. Altitudes.
            1. Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.
            2. The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) not sustain physical or functional damage at pressure altitudes up to 35,000 feet MSL.

            3. Operating.

            The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives and not sustain physical damage at absolute ceiling and pressure altitudes up to the maximum operating altitude for the AV as specified herein, and at 10,000 feet MSL for ground equipment.

          16. Solar Radiation.
          17. The VTUAV System should not experience physical damage and be capable of meeting its mission objectives when exposed to the diurnal solar radiation.

          18. Induced Environment.
          19. The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) not suffer damage and be capable of meeting its mission objectives when subjected to the heat, vibration, acceleration, and shock caused by equipment and subsystems and environmental control units.

          20. Vibration.
          21. The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) withstand vibrations induced during transport, as part of a mobile assemblage or installed within or upon a military vehicle, over roads and cross-country terrain.

          22. Mechanical Shock.
          23. The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) not suffer damage and be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives when subject to self-induced mechanical shock during operations or transport.

          24. Acceleration.

          The VTUAV System equipment shall(1) withstand positive and negative accelerations induced during vehicular transport, as part of a mobile assemblage or installed within or upon a wheeled military vehicle, over all types of roads and cross-country terrain. The VTUAV System equipment should withstand acceleration induced during rail, air and sea transport.

        4. System Reliability, Availability, Maintainability (RAM).
          1. Reliability.
            1. System Reliability.

The equipment shall(1) be designed such that a failure in one WRA does not induce failures in other WRAs. The Mean Flight Hour Between Operational Mission Failure – Design Controllable (MFHBOMFDC) of the VTUAV System (CFE and GFE) shall(2) have a point estimate of at least 190 hours when tested using design controllable failures. An Operational Mission Failure is any hardware, software failure or fault that prevents the system from meeting the system operations requirements defined in paragraph 3.2.5.1.

Design controllable failures used in the reliability calculations are:

    1. Design/Workmanship Failures: Failures due to design deficiencies or poor workmanship of the equipment, component part, or software.
    2. Component Part Failures: Failures due to defective component parts. In the event that several component parts of the same type fail during test, each one shall be considered as a separated failure, unless it can be shown that one failure caused one or more of the others to fail.
    3. Adjustments: The equipment should be designed not to require any adjustments. If adjustments of any kind are performed, this shall be considered a failure.
    4. BIT Failures: All BIT detected failures that result in any hardware being replaced/repaired including the BIT circuitry itself, shall be a failure.
    5. Connectors/Contacts Failures: Failures caused by faulty, corroded or contaminated WRA or SRA external contacts or connections, that can be corrected by reseating or treating shall be failures.
            1. Deleted.
          1. Availability.
          2. The VTUAV System shall(1) have an inherent operational availability (Ai) of 0.95 or greater. Ai is based on a mathematical relationship among two characteristics: reliability and maintainability. Ai is calculated as:

            Ai = MTBM

            MTBM+MMT

            Where:

            Mean Time Between Maintenance (MTBM) = The mean operating time plus mean standby time in an operational condition, MTBM is based on all maintenance actions, whether corrective or preventative.

            Mean Maintenance Time (MMT) = The mean maintenance time for both preventative and corrective maintenance actions.

          3. Maintainability.
          4. Maintenance to be performed on the AV at O level shall(1) be capable of being performed on the flight decks and hangar decks of all VTUAV capable ships.

            1. Mean Flight Hours Between Unscheduled Maintenance Actions.
            2. The VTUAV System (CFE and GFE) shall(1) have a point estimate Mean Flight Hours Between Unscheduled Maintenance Actions (MFHBUMA) of at least 36 hours. Unscheduled maintenance actions consists of all maintenance actions performed at the Organizational level that occur as the result of an indicated system or subsystem failure or discrepancy.

            3. Mean-Time-To-Repair.
            4. The VTUAV System Mean-Time-To-Repair (MTTR) shall(1) be £ 1.0 hrs. MTTR is the average elapsed organizational level maintenance time needed to repair all operational VTUAV System hardware failures. It includes fault location and isolation, access time, fault correction, adjustment and calibration and follow-up checkout time.

            5. Independence of Failures.

            Failure, damage, or removal of one item shall(1) not cause failure or damage in any other item and not cause a critical failure if there is a properly functioning item which is redundant to the failed item.

          5. System Diagnostics.
            1. Built-In-Test (BIT) Capabilities.
            2. The VTUAV System BIT shall(1) detect VTUAV subsystem and functional failures/faults and isolate them to the WRA level. This BIT requirement shall(2) include both avionics and non-avionics BIT and be automatically executed at periodic intervals without system degradation. The capability for manual initiation of BIT should be provided. The BIT function shall(3) be capable of displaying the failed WRA to the operators and storing the failure parameters for maintenance analysis. The entire VTUAV System, including all components and sensors of the MMPs, AVs, GCS, RDTs, and DLS, should be capable of a complete functional BIT without the use of external support equipment. System Prime Mission Equipment (PME) status will be reported as follows:

              a) Operate. PME is functionally operational.

              b) Degraded. PME is operational but has a non-critical failure that reduces its capabilities.

              c) Fail. PME has a non-recoverable failure and requires maintenance action.

              d) Standby. The equipment has no failures but is not currently transmitting.

            3. BIT Fault Detection Rate.
            4. The Fault Detection Rate (FDet) shall(1) be ³ 95%. FDet is defined as the total number of failures correctly detected BIT divided by the number of actual failures. This rate applies to the electronic WRA/SRA (where applicable) in the AV, MMP, RDT, DLS, and GCS.

            5. BIT Fault Isolation Rate.
            6. The Fault Isolation Rate (FI) shall(1) be ³ 95%. FI is defined as the total number of failures correctly isolated to the faulty WRA/SRA (where applicable) divided by the total number of failures detected by BIT.

            7. BIT False Alarms.

            The VTUAV System’s BIT False Alarm rate shall(1) not exceed 5%.

          6. Preventive/Scheduled Maintenance (Organizational Level or On-Site/On-Equipment).

Preventive/Scheduled Maintenance tasks should be determined in accordance with the Acquisition Logistics Support Specification (ALSS-263-01), paragraph 3.3.4. Daily scheduled maintenance tasks shall(1) take less than one hour and be required no more often than one flight per each AV. Preventive/Schedule Maintenance of redundant items will not interrupt operational performance. Preventive/Scheduled Organizational Level maintenance actions include:

    1. Phase Inspections
    2. Daily Inspections
    3. Turnaround Inspections
    4. Servicing
    5. Support Actions
    6. Special/Conditional Inspections
        1. Transportability.
        2. The VTUAV System shall(1) be configured for sea, ground, or air transport in less than 2 hours, and not:

          a) Overload a designated transport medium,

          b) Require special handling or specialized loading procedures (temperature limits, pressure limits, power source required, protective service or sensitive/classified),

          c) Exceed the following conditions:

          Length 20 feet

          Height 8 feet, 10 inches

          Width 9 feet

          Weight 10,000 lbs.

          Weight per linear foot 1,600 lbs.

          Floor contact pressure 50 psi

          Max axle load (pneumatic tires) 5,000 lbs.

          Max wheel load (pneumatic tires) 2,500 lbs.

          Tire pressure 90 psi

          1. Ground Transportability.
          2. The USMC VTUAV System shall(1) be ground transportable on HMMWVs Model S-788/G (or equivalent), type II Lightweight Multipurpose Shelter, M1097, M1038, M998, 5 ton trucks Model M942A, and High Mobility Trailer (HMT) M1102 trailers. Five ton trucks and Trailers may be used for transport of AVs in containers, POL, MMF and GSE. The system, as installed on HMMWVs and trailers, should be capable of fording a 30 inch water depth. The supplies and equipment to support the personnel of the fielded unit (approximately 100 lbs. of equipment per person and the personnel themselves - 175 lbs. per crew member) should be included in the system transportability requirements. Highway transport limits will adhere to the highway transport limits of foreign countries as depicted in MTMC Pamphlet 70-1. Lifting and tie-down provisions shall(2) be required. Loaded shelters are required to not exceed their physical and weight limitations. Total gross weight of the prime movers for the VTUAV System should not be exceeded.

          3. Rail Transportability.
          4. The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of rail transport and be capable of meeting the Gabarit International de-Chargement (GIC) rail clearance diagram requirements. The VTUAV System should be capable of withstanding rail impacts at speeds of up to 8 mph.

          5. Air Transportability.
          6. Each component of the VTUAV System shall (1) be capable of transport in a C-130, C-141, C-5, C-17 and similar aircraft, and be capable of being transported via VERtical REPlenishment (VERTREP) means by current and future vertical lift platforms to include: CH-46, CH-53, and the V-22. When configured in the land-based configurations and loaded on its HMMWV / trailer transportation vehicles, the VTUAV System shall possess drive-on / drive-off capability and be self-sustaining to support initial deployment operations.

          7. Marine Transportability.

The VTUAV System shall(1) be capable of transport by marine vessels to include pre-positioned ships, landing ships, or cargo ships of the U.S. Navy .

    1. Material Definition.
      1. Materials.
      2. The materials used in the VTUAV System shall(1) be suitable for operation in naval environments, naval aviation environments, and for extended periods of storage. Materials should resist degradation when exposed to the service life environments. This includes utilization of corrosion resistant protective finishes and corrosive resistive materials.

        1. Hazardous, Toxic and Ozone Depleting Chemicals Prevention.
        2. The use of toxic chemicals, hazardous substances, or ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) shall(1) be avoided. When unavoidable, the hazardous substances, toxic chemicals, or ODCs shall(2) be safety compliant, regulation compliant, and prohibitive in accordance with local, state, and federal regulations. The Department of Defense objective is to prevent hazardous and toxic materials and ozone depleting materials at the source.

        3. Materials Producibility.
        4. The materials utilized for the VTUAV System should possess proven manufacturing properties. Materials producibility should account for the following: materials maturity, manufacturing ability, and repeatability.

        5. Materials Inspectability.
        6. The VTUAV System should include provisions for the use of nondestructive testing and inspections. This should include the ability to detect critical defects, defect types, and sizes critical to part performance.

        7. Materials Repairability.
        8. Materials repairs should have properties equivalent to the original condition or properties to satisfy design requirements. Materials repair should account for damage, environment, processing, and supplier source.

        9. Recycled, Recovered, or Environmentally Preferable Materials.

        Recycled, recovered, or environmentally preferable materials, should be used to the maximum extent possible provided that the material meets or exceeds the operational and maintenance requirements, and promotes economically advantageous life cycle costs.

      3. Computer Hardware and Software.
      4. The VTUAV System shall(1) follow an Open Systems Architecture, including open specifications for interfaces, services, and formats, and comply with the Joint Technical Architecture (JTA) and Defense Information Infrastructure (DII) Common Operating Environment (COE) requirements to support uniformity and interoperability. Additionally, test points should allow for enhanced maintenance and troubleshooting features.

        1. Computer Hardware Requirements.
        2. The VTUAV System shall(1) use computer hardware capable of supporting the Tactical Control System (TCS) architecture.

          1. Data Storage and Main Memory Reserve Capacity.
          2. The VTUAV System shall(1) possess 50% reserve capacity for program instruction memory for each system processor, and 50% reserve capacity for data storage devices, evaluated under worst case loading conditions.

          3. Processing Speed/Throughout Reserve Capacity.
          4. The VTUAV System shall(1) provide 50% reserve capacity in throughput for each system processor, evaluated under worst case loading conditions. Techniques, such as bank switching, used to address memory requirements should not degrade the computer system performance during operational mission.

          5. Input / Output (I/O) Channel Requirements.
          6. The I/O channel throughput for each system processor shall(1) have 50% reserve capacity, with serial channels possessing a 50% reserve baud capacity, evaluated under worst case loading conditions.

          7. Processor and Firmware Enhancements.

          Processors shall(1) be upwardly-scaleable to yield faster execution, reduce life cycle costs, and mitigate obsolescence. The processors may be replaced by, or augmented by, another processor having an identical instruction set or instruction superset and memory architecture (word length and addressing scheme). Firmware should be compatible with existing and planned hardware configurations and allow for system enhancements.

        3. Computer Software.
        4. The VTUAV software shall(1) be modular and scaleable and be classified as either operational software or support software.

          Operational software includes programs executed to fulfill the VTUAV System’s mission and BIT software. BIT software includes programs for readiness test, fault detection, performance monitoring, maintenance data retrieval, and special test capabilities integral to the system.

          Support software includes capabilities required for the production, verification, and maintenance of all software and for the test and maintenance of system equipment.

          1. Firmware.
          2. Contractor developed / controlled computer programs that are stored in Read-Only-Memory (ROM), Programmable ROM (PROM), or other similar memory should be considered firmware. Included are computer programs and data loaded into memory that cannot be dynamically modified by the computer during processing.

          3. Programming Languages.
          4. The VTUAV System software shall(1) be Higher Order Languages (HOL) which follow ANSI, IEEE, or equivalent standards. The use of assembly language or low level code is restricted to processing-time-constrained and memory-constrained functions.

          5. Commenting Standards.
          6. Standards shall(1) be established and utilized for embedding comments in source code. The comment standards for banners, headers, and special comments will be as described in contractor approved standards, or an equivalent methodology.

          7. Error and Diagnostic Messages.
          8. The VTUAV System software shall(1) possess on-line error and diagnostic messages and require no additional interpretation by the user. The messages include a textual description of the condition, time of occurrence, required operator actions, and data processor and software execution status when applicable. Error and diagnostic messages are uniquely identifiable and be recorded or trapped. Errors detected in the processing of a command or function should result in an alert to the operator and the erroneous command or function ignored. Alerts should be immediately displayed to the operator upon error detection.

          9. Character Set Standards.
          10. Character sets should conform to commercial standards.

          11. Software Security.
          12. The VTUAV System software shall(1) possess the capability to be protected from unauthorized, intentional or unintentional, modification.

          13. Fault Tolerance.
          14. The VTUAV System software shall(1) prevent single point failures from disabling the entire system.

          15. Computer Program Regeneration.

        VTUAV System software shall(1) be capable of being regenerated via the source code as stored in the central repository. Patches to VTUAV software are not considered source code.

      5. Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3).
      6. The individual communication and electronic equipment/subsystems utilized on the VTUAV System shall(1) be inter- and intra-system/platform electro-magnetically compatible to ensure that system/platform operational performance requirements are met. The performance of the VTUAV System shall(2) not be degraded when exposed to its operational electromagnetic environment (natural or man-made).

        1. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC).
        2. All new or modified VTUAV System WRAs or modified portions of interface subsystems, shall(1) not interfere with, or be interfered by the operation of any other aircraft equipment or ground control station subsystem.

        3. Electromagnetic Vulnerability (EMV)
        4. The VTUAV System shall(1) be electro-magnetically compatible with the external electromagnetic environment (EME) of Table 1A. All VTUAV System equipment shall(2) be compatible with the electromagnetic environment (EME) on and around Navy flight decks, DOD and civilian airfields, battlefields, and the EME generated onboard the AV under mission conditions.

          Frequency

          (Hz)

          Environment (V/m)

          Peak

          Average

          10K-150M

          200

          200

          150M-225M

          3,120

          270

          225M-400M

          2,830

          240

          400M-700M

          4,000

          750

          700M-790M

          3,500

          240

          790-1000M

          3,500

          610

          1G-2G

          5,670

          1,000

          2G-2.7G

          21,270

          850

          2.7G-3.6G

          27,460

          1,230

          3.6G-4G

          21,270

          850

          4G-5.4G

          15,000

          610

          5.4-5.9G

          15,000

          1,230

          5.9G-6G

          15,000

          610

          6G-7.9G

          12,650

          670

          7.9G-8G

          12,650

          810

          8G-14G

          21,270

          1,270

          14G-18G

          21,270

          614

          18G-40G

          5,000

          750

          TABLE 1A

           

        5. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI).
        6. The generation of an electromagnetic environment by new or modified WRAs and the susceptibility of new or modified WRAs to an electromagnetic environment shall(1) be controlled within the limits of MIL-STD 461D. The following emissions and susceptibility requirements shall apply: CE102, CE106, CS101, CS103, CS104, CS105, CS114, CS115, CS116, RE102, RE103, and RS103. Bonding resistance between the aircraft structure and any WRA is to be 2.5 milli-ohms or less.

        7. Electromagnetic Radiation Hazards (HERP, HERF, HERO).
        8. The VTUAV System shall(1) protect personnel, ordnance and fuel from the hazardous effects of electromagnetic and electrostatic energy. The electromagnetic radiation hazard criteria of MIL-STD 464 are applicable.

        9. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD).
        10. The VTUAV System shall(1) control and dissipate the build-up of electrostatic charges caused by precipitation static (p-static), fluid flow, air flow, and other charge generating mechanisms to avoid fuel ignition and ordnance hazards, to protect personnel from shock hazards, and to prevent performance degradation or damage to electronics.

        11. TEMPEST.

        The system shall(1) meet the TEMPEST requirements of NSTISSAM TEMPEST/1-92 and NACSEM 5112, as applicable.

      7. Safety.
        1. System Safety.
        2. The VTUAV System shall(1) function / operate in a safe manner in accordance with MIL-STD-882 or its equivalent.

        3. Safety Provisions.

      The VTUAV System shall(1) ensure against degradation or negation of safety features during operations, maintenance, storage, and shipping. The VTUAV System should have fail-safe features with adequate redundancy, and be capable of being rendered safe during emergency or abnormal situations.

      The VTUAV System should minimize the probability and severity of injury to personnel during all activities including set-up, operation, maintenance, and tear-down throughout the life cycle of the equipment. The system shall(2) not cause electrical shock or thermal shock type injuries, and the operator’s stations designed to minimize inadvertent operator encounters with edges, shelves, and other station protuberances.

    2. Logistics.
    3. The VTUAV System shall(1) be supported in accordance with the Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (OPNAVINST 4790.2 series) and the Acquisition Logistics Support Specification (ALSS-263-01). The VTUAV System emphasizes maintainability, commonality, reliability, and accessibility of components to reduce maintenance, supply, support equipment, and manpower requirements.

      1. Support Equipment.

      The VTUAV System should use Support Equipment (SE) that is common to Naval Aviation. New/peculiar VTUAV SE shall(1) be capable of operating in VTUAV environments specified herein.

    4. Characteristics of System Elements.
      1. Air Vehicle.
        1. Design Life.
        2. The Air Vehicle shall(1) have a design life which minimizes the AV Total Ownership Costs (TOC) over 6000 flight hours and 20 years.

        3. AV Performance.
        4. Characteristics of the AV are contained below and based on International Standard Atmosphere (ISA) standard day conditions with AV weight complement of payloads and the amount of fuel needed to accomplish the AV specific mission.

          1. Flight Profile.
          2. The AV shall(1) have an operating radius of at least 110 nautical miles (nm) and be capable of loitering at that radius for at least 3 hours utilizing internal fuel only with the MMP operating. It shall(2) then return to its original launch point without refueling and have a 20 minute fuel reserve calculated for loiter at a 10,000 ft MSL, maximum endurance flight profile, under ISA day conditions.

          3. Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) Operations.
          4. The AV shall(1) be capable of conducting VTOL operations at 4000ft Density Altitude (DA) conditions from an unprepared land-based site, suitable to conduct air operations without damage to AV or components, with a 200 lb. MMP, and 100% mission fuel load to meet the flight profile of paragraph 3.5.1.2.1.

            The AV shall(2) be capable of a steady state hover, out of ground effect, at 4000ft DA, with a 200 lb. MMP, a 100% mission fuel load to meet the flight profile of paragraph 3.5.1.2.1, and in winds up to 25 knots from any relative direction.

            1. Shipboard Compatibility.
            2. The AV shall(1) be capable of conducting VTOL operations at 4000ft DA from all VTUAV capable ships, with a deck displacement of ±5o pitch, ±8o roll, ±2.5o yaw, and ±0.25g heave acceleration from 0o centerline, in winds up to 25 knots from any direction, a 200 lb. MMP, and 100% mission fuel load to meet the flight profile of paragraph 3.5.1.2.1. Flight control system response characteristics in AV launch and recovery should be sufficient to safely control the AV in the deck conditions delineated herein.

              1. Deck Spotting, Storage, and Accessibility.
              2. The AV should be capable of being service, prepared for flight, and launched within the footprint of a single spot flight deck certified for SH-60 launch and recovery. Storage of all air vehicles and associated equipment shall(1) not exceed the space defined by 1 stowed SH-60 helicopter roughly: height of 13 feet 5 inches, width of 7 feet 9 inches, and length of 40 feet 10 inches. Maintenance of the AV and associated equipment should also be conducted in the same space.

              3. Tip-back and Turnover.

            At all possible AV center of gravity configurations, the AV shall(1) not tip-back or turnover under the maximum deck displacements specified herein, including operating and non-operating periods.

          5. Service Ceiling.
          6. The AV shall(1) have a service ceiling which will maximize the VTUAV System’s capability of meeting its mission objectives as defined herein.

          7. Airspeed.
          8. The AV shall(1) have an operational airspeed range which will maximize the VTUAV System’s capability of meeting it mission objectives as defined herein.

          9. Weight.
          10. A mission ready AV shall(1) be capable of being emplaced by no more than four people to support and perform the movement of the AV from its mover/storage site to the launch/recovery site and then back to the mover/storage site. The AV weight should have a positive margin between mission weight and gross vehicle weight.

            1. Weight Variations.

            Weight changes to components and subsystems should not adversely affect required flying qualities and performance.

          11. AV Position Accuracy.
          12. The AV shall(1) will possess a spatial location accuracy of at least 25m (82ft) SEP during the in-flight phase of the mission for use in VTUAV System calculations.

          13. Handling Qualities.
          14. The VTUAV System shall(1) not allow operator or automatic control inputs that would result in an AV maneuver that exceeds the AV operating envelope.

            1. AV Launch and Recovery.
            2. The AV shall(1) be capable of safely launching, recovering, and if applicable, rotor engagement in at least 25 knots of wind.

            3. Autonomous Emergency Recovery.
            4. The AV shall(1) have the capability to automatically transition into an Autonomous Emergency Recovery Mode (AERM) to recover the AV at pre-designated locations during emergency modes. This mode will allow the AV to safely recover to land based areas and to return to over water areas in such a manner which will allow for AV retrieval by a VTUAV capable ship.

            5. Wave-off.
            6. When performing a landing and issued a wave-off command, the AV shall(1) maintain steady controlled flight and execute a pre-programmed wave-off routine that ensures safe avoidance of the landing area and associated structures and objects.

            7. Flight Outside the Flight Envelope.
            8. The VTUAV AV shall(1) possess sufficient control power and response rate to safely return to the AV operating flight envelope through the automatic flight control system.

            9. Transfer of Flight Control Modes.

            Engagement, disengagement or changes to the AV flight control mode shall(1) be achievable and not result in dangerous stability or control characteristics.

          15. AV Environmental Conditions.
          16. In addition to the VTUAV System environmental conditions of specified in section 3.2, the AV should be able to operate and withstand the conditions specified below.

            1. Temperature Extremes.
            2. The AV shall(1) safely operate in and meet the VTUAV System’s mission objectives when exposed to temperatures between -20o F / -29o C to 122° F / +50oC for daily cycle.

            3. Rain.
            4. The AV shall(1) be capable of operating in and meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives when exposed to precipitation measuring 12.5 millimeter (mm)(1/2 inch) per hour for one hour with a 2.25mm mean droplet size, with a Standard Deviation of 0.77mm.

            5. Icing.
            6. The AV shall(1) be capable of detecting and transiting through light icing conditions as derived from figures (3) & (4), moderate icing conditions curves.

            7. Vibration.

            The AV shall(1) not suffer physical or functional damage and meet the VTUAV System’s mission objectives when subjected to vibration present throughout the AV operating environment.

          17. AV Modes of Operation.
          18. The AV shall(1) be capable of flying pre-programmed mission profiles independent of navigational assistance from the GCS, and be capable of being controlled via the Air Vehicle Operator’s Console with manual flight control functions. With loss of the data link, the VTUAV System shall(2) attempt to reestablish data link while continuing on the pre-programmed flight path and mission profile. When data link is not re-established within a predetermined time period, the AV shall(3) be capable of fully autonomous flight to a pre-designated point and perform an autonomous emergency recovery. The AV mission phase main modes of operation are:

            a) Pre-launch: In this mode all AV pre-launch activities are accomplished. The AV will accomplish pre-launch activities using the data link or ground cable connected between the GCS and the AV.

            b) Launch: In this mode manual or automatic AV launch is accomplished.

            c) Flight: In this mode flight activities are accomplished.

            d) Recovery: In this mode AV recovery is accomplished.

            1. In-Flight Operations.

The AV shall(1) have the following in-flight capabilities:

a) Autonomous navigation and flight between multiple, selected waypoints.

b) Automatic loiter and track on command.

c) Automatic execution of lost-link procedures to reacquire the data link in the event of data link loss of contact.

Figure (3)

d) Automatic return to a pre-planned recovery area when a lost data link connection is not reacquired within a predetermined period of time. Automatic refers to a series of pre-programmed steps that allow the mission planners to set waypoints, altitudes, speeds, execution time (the period of time after lost link), holding, climbing, descending, and landing instructions.

    1. Autonomous execution of emergency procedures due to electrical generator failure or other critical AV subsystem failure.

 

Figure (4)

        1. AV Functional Requirements.
        2. The AV should contain the necessary equipment to maintain control of the AV subsystems, communicate with the GCS, provide communication relay, and perform its missions.

          1. Air Vehicle Data Link.
          2. The AV should contain the ADT as defined in section 3.5.5.

          3. Embedded Voice Communications Relay.
          4. The AV shall(1) have a ground tunable USN aviation standard embedded (secure voice capable) communication, Ultra High Frequency radio (UHF)/Very High Frequency radio (VHF) for voice relay capability to/from the GCS.

          5. Identification Friend or Foe (IFF).
          6. The AV shall(1) have an Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) Mode I, II, III, IIIC, and IV combat identification system capability and be capable of automatic or manual in-flight programming. It should also conform with FAA regulations for altitude encoding transponders specified via 14 CFR section 91.215.

          7. Locator Beacon.
          8. The AV should possess the capability to emit a locator signal compatible with existing naval search & rescue systems.

          9. Battle Group Inter-Operability.
          10. The AV shall(1) be capable of becoming part of the network centric warfare environment and interface with all available nodes on such a network as an operational user. The VTUAV System should contain provisions for incorporation of LINK-16, TCAS-I, and similar network interface capabilities on the AV.

          11. Navigation Lights.
          12. The AV shall(1) have a navigation and anti-collision lighting system, which is compliant with Federal Aviation Administration regulations regarding flight in the national aerospace and be capable of being activated or deactivated from the GCS. The VTUAV System should contain anti-collision lighting having an operator selectable capability for Night Vision Device (NVD) or for visible light range.

          13. Navigation.

The AV shall(1) have the following modes of navigation, be capable of switching between all modes as necessary to meet mission requirements, and meet all requirements for military operations. Loss of GPS or INS source/functionality should not result in a loss of navigation solution or flight safety.

a) Global Positioning System (GPS) Navigation - AV navigation solution is calculated using only GPS data.

    1. Inertial Navigation System (INS) Navigation - AV navigation solution is calculated using an internal INS sensor.
    2. Aided Navigation – AV navigation solution is calculated using a weighted combination of multiple navigation sensors.
    3. Present Position Navigation – AV navigation solution is updated using the current AV present position as determined from mark on top or derived from system or sensor updates.
          1. MMP Provisions.

The AV shall(1) incorporate a payload capability that provides the following functions or provisions.

    1. Support operation of 1 or more MMP in steady state hover and in loiter flight conditions.
    2. Provide a minimum of 2.5 kilowatts (kW) continuous electrical power to support MMP under worst case AV power load conditions.
    3. Provide a total MMP weight capacity of at least 200 lbs.
    4. Provide a total internal MMP volume of at least two cubic feet.
    5. Provide an interface, via the MMP ICD, to support operation of 1 or more MMP.
    6. Provide aircraft position, attitude, and other flight information to the MMP.
          1. AV Servicing.

The AV shall(1) incorporate the following functions or provisions.

    1. Possess an embedded gravity fuel and de-fuel capability,
    2. Withstand and remain operational after a fresh water wash of the airframe and engine,
    3. Possess lift and hoisting (hard) point capable of supporting a mission ready AV,
    4. Use JP-5 and JP-8 fuels, and
    5. Possess a single point grounding plug.
            1. Ground Operation Provisions.

All AV components should be capable of being operated to accomplish system maintenance, training, and / or system preparation by either an external Auxiliary Power Unit or from deck-edge power for at least 30 minutes under worse case thermal and environmental conditions without external cooling.

      1. Modular Mission Payload (MMP).
        1. Initial MMP.
        2. The initial MMP provides near real time (NRT) IMagery INTelligence (IMINT) support under all environmental conditions which the VTUAV System operates. The initial MMP capability shall(1) consist of a day/night passive imagery sensor, and laser designator with the capability to identify and designate a 2.3 meter x 2.3 meter NATO standard target from a slant range of at least 6km. The IR sensor should be capable of meeting the mission requirements when evaluated using standard FLIR-92 and ACQUIRE models with a target to background temperature difference of 2° C at an ambient temperature of 25° C. The visible sensor should account for target contrast and sun angle to meet the VTUAV System’s mission objectives, particularity in twilight conditions. The laser designator should be capable of achieving the required range performance with a target reflectivity of 10%. The atmosphere used for modeling is a standard maritime atmosphere as defined by MODTRAN with visibility of 23 km. Probability of identification of the target is 50%.

        3. Flight Operation.
        4. The MMP shall(1) operate within the flight envelope and under the same climatic, altitude, and battlefield conditions as the VTUAV System.

        5. Payload Tracking and Pointing.
          1. Automatic Tracking.
          2. Applicable MMPs shall(1) be capable of automatically tracking a moving object, and keeping a stationary object in the center Field of View (FOV). Tracking accuracy should be sufficient to allow target designation at the specified ranges.

          3. Geographic Pointing.
          4. The MMP shall(1) be able to automatically point at a specified geographic location within the payload’s field of regard (FOR). In conjunction with the air vehicle’s automatic loiter capability, the MMP should be able to maintain constant surveillance and track on a designated geographic point.

          5. Fixed Pointing.

          The MMP shall(1) be able to continuously point at a fixed azimuth and depression.

        6. Payload Control.
        7. The MMP shall(1) be capable of being controlled manually by an MPO in the GCS, or automatically controlled via the mission plan. MMP command & controls shall(2) be accomplished independent of AV command & controls.

        8. Data Display.
        9. . The MMP shall(1) supply the coordinates for payload center FOV to the VTUAV System for display in the GCS and/or RDT, and imagery and payload status indications for display to the MPO.

        10. MMP Cooling System.
        11. If applicable, the MMP detector cooling system shall(1) be a closed-loop, self-contained system, and not require charging prior to flight.

        12. Sensor Metadata.
        13. The MMP shall(1) be capable of providing sensor specific metadata for imagery embedding. Typical sensor metadata elements include: FOV, focal length, azimuth angle, depression angle, sensor type, time stamp, sensor settings, and sensor motion information (roll, pitch, and yaw).

        14. MMP Interfaces.

        The MMP interface should be in accordance with the MMP ICD. Installation / loading of MMP elements into the VTUAV System shall(1) not require modification of AV, GCS, or RDT core operating software. Additionally, the MMP interface should support the operation of the Pioneer UAV Versatron 12DS payload.

      2. Ground Control Station (GCS).
      3. The GCS is the command and control center for the VTUAV System. Each GCS controls and monitors AV via the DLS. The DLS receives telemetry and imagery data from the AV and transmits command and control data to the AV from the GCS. Operationally, the GCS should support: multiple AV command and control; DLS command and control; embedded communication relay; mission payload command and control; imagery annotation and imagery processing functions; and tactical communications with the users. The VTUAV System’s command and control functions should be incorporated and integrated into the ship’s internal command and control system.

        1. GCS Architecture.
        2. The GCS workstations for both the USN and USMC VTUAV Systems shall(1) be based on the family of AN/UYQ-70 consoles. The GCS workstations shall(2) be capable of hosting a TCS Element which will provide all functionality associated with C4I connectivity and Level 1 through 5 control of the AV and MMP. The GCS functionality aboard DDG-51 and CG-47 class ships shall(3) be integrated in the AEGIS weapon system. The production TCS Element (see Figure (5)) will be capable of successfully integrating with the total TCS architecture as developed and defined by the Program Manager of the Tactical Control System, PM-TS.

          Figure (5)

        3. Environmental Conditions.
          1. Rain Operating Conditions.
          2. The ground components of the VTUAV System should continue to operate and be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives in a rain shower of 2 inches per hour for one hour in winds up to 35 knots.

          3. Wind.
          4. The VTUAV GCS should not sustain any physical damage and be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives during steady winds of up to 35 knots with gusts to 45 knots.

          5. Icing.

          The VTUAV GCS should remain operational and be capable of meeting the VTUAV System’s mission objectives when subject to icing conditions as defined in Figure (4).

        4. GCS Communications.
        5. The GCS shall(1) allow for external and internal voice tactical communications among the flight crew members (Mission Commanders, AVO, MPO), the Tactical Commanders, and maintenance support personnel as required.

          1. Ground System Communications.

The GCS system ground communications shall(1) conform to the following standards, provisions, or capabilities:

    1. Use USN/USMC standard tactical communications equipment and procedures for ground VTUAV components.
    2. Contain a minimum of two UHF/VHF radios. The UHF/VHF VTUAV System communications capability must be digital data capable and interface with standard DoD C4I systems, architectures, and protocols. The radios should be integrated into the internal voice communication suite of the GCS.
    3. All radio and telephone communications are to be interoperable with National Security Agency (NSA) approved encryption systems.
    4. Communication equipment should be capable of exporting MMP data to other imagery systems.
    5. If any commercial or non-developmental items (NDI) subsystems are used in the GCS, all DoD, National and International spectrum management policies and regulations are to be satisfied.
        1. GCS Data Recording.
        2. The GCS should have provisions for recording AV up-link and down-link command and control data, MMP data, and internal and external voice communications.

        3. General Physical Characteristics for GCS Shelters.
          1. Shelter Characteristics.
          2. All deployable USMC shelters shall(1) be HMMWV compatible light-weight multipurpose shelters, similar to the S-788/G shelter. USN Land-based shelters should be no larger than a standard S-280 shelter.

            1. Climatic Control.
            2. The shelters shall(1) utilize standard DoD heating and cooling equipment to meet climatic control requirements.

            3. Environmental Control.

            Heating and cooling vents shall(1) be provided for all occupied spaces in the VTUAV GCS; at outside ambient temperatures of -20° F, the heating system maintains an effective temperature of at least 64° F within the personnel space; at outside ambient temperatures of 122° F, the cooling system maintains an effective temperature of no greater than 84° F within the personnel space. Personnel shall(2) be provided an acoustical environment which should not cause personnel injury, interfere with voice or any other communications, cause fatigue, or in any other way degrade system effectiveness.

          3. Electrical Power.
          4. The VTUAV System ground equipment shall(1) use standard electrical power sources, available within the DoD family of mobile electrical power sources, integrated to supply the appropriate electrical power on a continuous operation. The VTUAV System ground equipment should be capable of restoring and/or maintaining electrical back-up power in sufficient time to avoid critical mission data loss, computer memory loss, or loss of AV control. The VTUAV System’s mission objectives should continue to be achievable after restoration of electrical power. The GCS electrical power system should support the use commercial or shipboard compatible standard electrical Alternating Current (AC) power. The VTUAV System should have electrical / electronic equipment protection devices to prevent power surge / power failure damage. A VTUAV System vehicle/prime mover is not to be used as a source of electric power.

          5. Lightning Protection.

The GCS system shall(1) meet the lightning requirements as defined in MIL-STD-464, paragraph 5.4. Indirect lightning effects for VTUAV System ground equipment should be considered and mitigated.

      1. Remote Data Terminal (RDT).
        1. Mission.
        2. The RDT shall(1) provide the user with access to payload imagery and data, independent of the GCS, from an AV at a minimum of 50Km (27nm). NRT payload imagery and AV related information, to include: AV position, heading, and MSL altitude, date time group, target location, and north seeking arrow shall(2) be displayed to the users via the RDT. The RDT antenna shall be connected to the RDT via a cable with a minimum length of 50 m. Additionally, the RDT should be capable of connecting to an output from the GCS shelter to receive imagery and data supplied by the GCS via an interface cable. In this mode, users external to the GCS can observe the payload imagery and data as received and distributed by MPO.

        3. RDT Configuration.
        4. The RDT shall(1) use computer hardware capable providing Tactical Control System (TCS) Level 2 functionality and possess provisions for recording imagery and data. TCS Level 2 functionality should be limited to receipt of payload data.

        5. Environment.
        6. The RDT should successfully operate in the environments stated herein.

        7. RDT BIT.
        8. The RDT shall(1) be capable of performing BIT and providing the users with health and maintenance data.

        9. Information Interface.
        10. All external interfaces shall(1) use standard interface ports.

        11. Electrical Power Interface.
        12. The RDT shall(1) operate from standard AC or Direct Current (DC) electrical power sources. The RDT can be powered from a GCS shelter or from vehicle, man pack, or similar battery when remote from other power sources.

        13. Physical Characteristics.

        The RDT shall(1) be capable of being transported by not more than two people and be capable of being setup and placed into operation by one person within 30 minutes.

      2. Data Link Suite (DLS).
        1. General Description.
        2. There are two (2) functional elements of the DLS: a ground portion referred to as the Ground Data Terminal (GDT) which physically separates the RF energy source from the GCS (to enhance crew survivability) and an Airborne Data Terminal (ADT). The DLS shall(1) include a primary and a secondary data link. The AV should be able to use either data link for air vehicle command, control, and AV feedback, however, the primary data link should be the main link for MMP data transmission. If the VTUAV System determines the primary link to be unusable, it switches automatically to the secondary data link in such a manner to continue successful and safe AV flight and mission operations. The VTUAV System should allow operator selection of data links. The DLS should provide the capability for encrypting the primary and secondary data links. A zeroize capability to clear encryption codes and keys automatically (initiated with eminent loss of flight) or manually shall(2) be required. The VTUAV System DLS shall(3) be approved by the Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Center.

        3. Data Link Suite Performance.
          1. Primary Data Link.
          2. The primary data link shall(1) be the Ku-Band Tactical Common Data Link (TCDL). The primary data link transmits AV command/control, MMP command/control, and tactical voice communications to the air vehicle. The primary data link receives air vehicle health/status, MMP imagery and data, and tactical voice communications from the air vehicle. The effective range of the primary data link shall(2) be 150 nm (LOS permitting) without relay from other airborne or surface relay systems. Integration of the primary data link aboard VTUAV capable surface combatant ships should use the Ku-band modified SRQ-4 shipboard antenna system.

          3. Secondary Data Link.
          4. A secondary data link shall(1) be provided predominantly as a redundant command and control data link and have an operational range of 110 nm to achieve the mission combat radius. Handoff from one GCS to another GCS should occur within the design combat radius. The secondary data link transmits AV command/control and tactical voice communications to the AV. The secondary link receives AV and MMP health/status and tactical voice communications from the air vehicle.

          5. GDT Performance.
          6. The GDT shall(1) contain the necessary equipment of the primary and secondary data links and perform the following functions:

            a) Provide capability to separate RF energy from the GCS to enhance system / crew survivability.

            b) Not create interference with other friendly electronic systems to the level they are not usable.

            c) Be capable of simultaneous transmission of command up-link and reception of sensors/AV telemetry down-link using discrete, selectable frequencies.

            d) Provide data distribution (imagery and system data) from the AV to the GCS and RDT, via discrete and selectable frequencies.

            1. GDT Power Requirements.

            The GDT shall(1) operate from standard AC or Direct Current (DC) electrical power sources. The GDT can be powered from a GCS shelter or from vehicle, man pack, or similar battery when remote from other power sources. The GDT should be capable of restoring and/or maintaining electrical back-up power in sufficient time to avoid critical mission data loss or loss of AV control. The VTUAV System’s mission objectives should continue to be achievable after restoration of electrical power. The GDT should have electrical / electronic equipment protection devices to prevent power surge / power failure damage.

          7. ADT Performance.

The function of the ADT shall(1) be to receive up-link commands and transmit down-link air vehicle health/status and MMP imagery, command, control, and other mission data. The ADT should be compatible with the avionics suite and meet the requirements specified in paragraph 3.5.1.

  1. VERIFICATION
  2. This section defines the verifications envisioned by the Government to determine whether the VTUAV System conforms to all requirements delineated in section 3 of this specification. Actual test verification program and plan will be developed by the VTUAV IPT team in accordance with (IAW) the Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV) contract. Single and/or multiple verification subparagraphs and methods may be required to verify a specific requirement.

    The contractor will be responsible for conducting, in accordance with the Government’s management/approval principles, all verifications required herein. Test plans, procedures, verifications, and reports will be subject to review and concurrence of the appropriate IPT team. Table 4-1, Requirement / Verification Cross-Reference Matrix, illustrates the requirement and verification methods necessary to ensure VTUAV System compliance.

    1. Methods of Verification.
    2. The methods utilized to accomplish verification include:

      (N/A) Not Applicable. Verification is not warranted.

      (1) Analysis. Verification will be accomplished by technical evaluation or mathematical models & simulations, algorithms, charts, graphs, circuit diagrams, or scientific principles and procedures to provide evidence that stated requirements were met.

      (2) Demonstration. Verification will be accomplished by actual operation, adjustment, or re-configuration of items to provide evidence that the designed functions were accomplished under specific scenarios. The test article may be instrumented and quantitative limits of performance monitored/measured.

      (3) Examination. Verification will be accomplished by inspection, without the use of special laboratory equipment or procedures, to determine conformance to the specified requirements which can be determined by the investigators. Examination will be non-destructive and can include: sight, hearing, smell, touch, and taste, and physical manipulation, mechanical and electrical gauging and measurement, and other forms of investigation.

      (4) Test. Verification will be accomplished by systematic exercising of the applicable item under appropriate conditions with instrumentation to measure required parameters. Collection, analysis, and evaluation of quantitative data will determine that the measured parameters equal or exceed specified requirements.

    3. Classification of Verification.
    4. Verification classification levels are defined below and include:

      A – Design. The VTUAV System design includes the GCS, RDT, AV, MMP, and DLS. As such, design verifications will be conducted on the total system design to verify the requirements specified in section 3, and the interoperability of each element. Individual VTUAV System elements will be verified independently prior to being verified as part of the total VTUAV System.

      B – First Article Inspection. Reserved.

      C – Acceptance Inspection. Reserved

      D – Special Inspection. Reserved

    5. Inspection Facilities and Equipment.
    6. The contractor, in accordance with the Government’s management/approval principles, will establish and maintain test and measuring equipment and inspection facilities of sufficient accuracy, quality, and quantity to permit performance of required verifications. Equipment can include appropriate commercial, military, or specially designed inspection equipment.

    7. Test Plans, Methods, and Procedures.
    8. Verification analyses, demonstrations, examinations, and tests will be conducted in accordance with the IPT approved detailed test methods and procedures. These test procedures will include tests, test sequence, test criteria, and number of tests required. Testing will be accomplished in accordance with the program Integrated Master Schedule and the Master Test Plan. If an item, element has been previously tested and has met the requirements of this specification, additional testing is not required if substantiating data/reports so indicate.

    9. Detailed Verification Requirements.
      1. Environmental Verification.
        1. Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Requirements.
        2. The VTUAV System when in its field configurations should be verified to meet the requirements of section 3.3.3 of this specification. Verification methods and requirements are to be measured in accordance with the methods defined in MIL-STD-462 and shall meet the performance requirements defined in MIL-STD-461. A National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) facility will be used to verify qualification limits.

          1. E3 Facilities.
          2. If required, Government E3 testing and evaluation facilities can be utilized to accomplish E3 verifications. The E3 IPT and TPWG, will determine the most cost effective facility to perform the subject tests and will incorporate such data into the program Integrated Master Schedule and the Master Test Plan.

          3. COTS and NDI.

    Compliance of NDI and commercial items (COTS) to MIL-STD 461D limits are to be verified by test, analysis, or a combination thereof.

     

    Table -1

    REQUIREMENT / VERIFICATION CROSS-REFERENCE MATRIX

    Section 3

    Verification Method

    Verification Class

    Section 4

    Requirement

    Description

    N/A

    1

    2

    3

    4

    A

    B

    C

    D

    Verification

    ( ) = Shall Number

    3.2.1.3

    Ground Control Station (GCS).

    X

    4.4

    3.2.2.1.1

    USN Sea-Based.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.2.1.2

    USN Land-Based.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.2.2

    USMC Configurations.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.3

    External Interfaces.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.4

    Internal Interfaces.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.1

    Mission Capability Requirements.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.2

    System Computations.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.3

    Target Location Accuracy.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.4.1

    Pre-Flight Programming.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.4.2

    In-Flight Programming.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.5.1 (1)

    Launch & Recovery.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.5.1 (2)

    Launch & Recovery.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.5.1 (3)

    Launch & Recovery.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.5.2

    Command & Control Hand-off.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.5.3 (1)

    Simultaneous Operations.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.5.3 (2)

    Simultaneous Operations.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.1.6

    VTUAV System Communications.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.1.1

    Automatic Launch & Recovery.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.1.2 (1)

    Deck Restraining and Storage.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.1.2 (2)

    Deck Restraining and Storage.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.1.4

    Fueling.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.2.1

    Set-Up Times.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.2.2

    Preparation for Transportation Times.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.2.3 (1)

    Launch and Recovery Time.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.2.3 (2)

    Launch and Recovery Time.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.2.3 (3)

    Launch and Recovery Time.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.3

    UAV to UAV System Interoperability.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.5

    VTUAV System Survivability.

    X

    X

    3.2.5.2.6

    Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Contamination.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.7

    Electrical Power.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.7.1

    Emergency Power.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.8

    Shipboard Environment.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.2.9

    Human Engineering.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.1.1

    Operational Temperature Extremes.

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.1.3

    Operational Temperature Shock.

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.2

    Humidity.

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.3.1

    Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.7

    Fungus.

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.8

    Salt Fog.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.9

    Blowing Sand and Dust.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.10.1

    Non-Operating, Storage, and Transit.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.10.2

    Operating.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.12

    Induced Environment.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.13

    Vibration.

    X

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.14

    Mechanical Shock.

    X

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.3.15

    Acceleration.

    X

    (1)

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.1.1 (1)

    System Reliability.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.1.1 (2)

    System Reliability.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.2

    Availability.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.3

    Maintainability.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.3.1

    Mean Flight Hours Between Unscheduled Maintenance Actions.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.3.2

    Mean-Time-To-Repair.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.3.3

    Independence of Failures.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.4.1 (1)

    Built-In-Test (BIT) Capabilities.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.4.1 (2)

    Built-In-Test (BIT) Capabilities.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.4.1 (3)

    Built-In-Test (BIT) Capabilities.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.4.2

    BIT Fault Detection Rate.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.4.3

    BIT Fault Isolation Rate.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.4.4

    BIT False Alarms.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.4.5

    Preventive/Scheduled Maintenance (Organizational Level or On-Site/On-Equipment).

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.5

    Transportability.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.5.1 (1)

    Ground Transportability.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.5.1 (2)

    Ground Transportability.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.5.2

    Rail Transportability.

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.5.3

    Air Transportability.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.2.5.5.4

    Marine Transportability.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.1

    Materials.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.1.1 (1)

    Hazardous, Toxic and Ozone Depleting Chemicals Prevention.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.1.1 (2)

    Hazardous, Toxic and Ozone Depleting Chemicals Prevention.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2

    Computer Hardware and Software.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.1

    Computer Hardware Requirements.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.1.1

    Data Storage and Main Memory Reserve Capacity.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.1.2

    Processing Speed/Throughout Reserve Capacity.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.1.3

    Input / Output (I/O) Channel Requirements.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.1.4

    Processor and Firmware Enhancements.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2

    Computer Software.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2.2

    Programming Languages.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2.3

    Commenting Standards.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2.4

    Error and Diagnostic Messages.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2.6

    Software Security.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2.7

    Fault Tolerance.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.2.2.8

    Computer Program Regeneration.

    X

    4.4

    3.3.3 (1)

    Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3).

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3 (2)

    Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3).

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.1

    Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC).

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.2 (1)

    Electromagnetic Vulnerability (EMV)

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.2 (2)

    Electromagnetic Vulnerability (EMV)

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.3

    Electromagnetic Interference (EMI).

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.4

    Electromagnetic Radiation Hazards (HERP, HERF, HERO).

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.5

    Electrostatic Discharge (ESD).

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.3.6

    TEMPEST.

    X

    4.5.1.1

    3.3.4.1

    System Safety.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.4.2 (1)

    Safety Provisions.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.3.4.2 (2)

    Safety Provisions.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.4

    Logistics.

    X

    4.4

    3.4.1

    Support Equipment.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.1

    Design Life.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.1 (1)

    Flight Profile.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.1 (2)

    Flight Profile.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.2 (1)

    Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) Operations.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.2 (2)

    Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) Operations.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.2.1

    Shipboard Compatibility.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.2.1.1

    Deck Spotting, Storage, and Accessibility.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.2.1.2

    Tip-back and Turnover.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.3

    Service Ceiling.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.4

    Airspeed.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.5

    Weight.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.6

    AV Position Accuracy.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.7

    Handling Qualities.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.7.1

    AV Launch and Recovery.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.7.2

    Autonomous Emergency Recovery.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.7.3

    Wave-off.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.7.4

    Flight Outside the Flight Envelope.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.7.5

    Transfer of Flight Control Modes.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.8.1

    Temperature Extremes.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.8.2

    Rain.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.8.3

    Icing.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.8.4

    Vibration.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.9 (1)

    AV Modes of Operation.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.9 (2)

    AV Modes of Operation.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.9 (3)

    AV Modes of Operation.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.2.9.1

    In-Flight Operations.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.2

    Embedded Voice Communications Relay.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.3

    Identification Friend or Foe (IFF).

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.5

    Battle Group Inter-Operability.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.6

    Navigation Lights.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.7

    Navigation.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.8

    MMP Provisions.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.1.3.9

    AV Servicing.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.1

    Modular Mission Payload (MMP).

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.2

    Flight Operation.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.3.1

    Automatic Tracking.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.3.2

    Geographic Pointing

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.3.3

    Fixed Pointing.

    X

    X

    3.5.2.4 (1)

    Payload Control.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.4 (2)

    Payload Control.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.5

    Data Display.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.6

    MMP Cooling System.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.7

    Sensor Metadata.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.2.8 (1)

    MMP Interfaces.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.1 (1)

    GCS Architecture.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.1 (2)

    GCS Architecture.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.1 (3)

    GCS Architecture.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.3

    GCS Communications.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.3.1

    Ground System Communications.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.5.1

    Shelter Characteristics.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.5.1.1

    Climatic Control.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.5.1.2 (1)

    Environmental Control.

    X

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.5.1.2 (2)

    Environmental Control.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.5.2

    Electrical Power.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.3.5.3

    Lightning Protection.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.1 (1)

    Mission.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.1 (2)

    Mission.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.2

    RDT Configuration.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.4

    RDT BIT.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.5

    Information Interface.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.6

    Electrical Power Interface.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.4.7

    Physical Characteristics.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.1 (1)

    General Description.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.1 (2)

    General Description.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.1 (3)

    General Description.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.2.1 (1)

    Primary Data Link.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.2.1 (2)

    Primary Data Link.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.2.2

    Secondary Data Link.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.2.3

    GDT Performance.

    X

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.2.3.1

    GDT Power Requirements.

    X

    4.4

    3.5.5.2.4

    ADT Performance.

    X

    4.4

    Method of Verification

    Classes of Verification

    N/A – Not Applicable

    A – Design

    1 – Analysis

    B – 1st Article

    2 – Demonstration

    C – Acceptance

    3 – Examination

    D – Special

    4 – Test

  3. PACKAGING
  4. The VTUAV System packaging requirements will be IAW the Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV) contract. Utilization of existing packaging techniques and equipment will be used to maintain the best value philosophy.

  5. NOTES
    1. Intended Use.
    2. The VTUAV System is a replacement for the Pioneer UAV System and will operate in MAGTF and USN UAV squadrons. The VTUAV System will operate from LHA, LHD, LPD-17, DD-21, CG-47, and DDG-51 class ships and will provide near-real-time imagery and data to support Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance for operations ashore and afloat. The System will provide enhanced mission capabilities for the MAGTF and USN UAV squadrons by providing a vertical take-off and landing capability for the AV. The VTUAV System’s advanced sensor capability will improve detection, identification and targeting of USN and USMC weapons systems.

      Responses received from the US Navy’s Request For Information (RFI) regarding VTUAV Systems revealed no commercial/military systems which could be procured without tailored development or integration efforts. The US Navy will use available technologies and systems to reduce development time and life cycle ownership costs of the VTUAV System.

    3. Objectives.

As defined in section 3.0, the following performance parameters or equipment characteristics are the VTUAV System objective goals. The objective goal is related to a threshold requirement delineated in section 3 and is cross-referenced in the table below.


OBJECTIVE REQUIREMENT

Spec Paragraph

   

The VTUAV System must be interoperable with other U.S. and Allied nations' functionally related C4I systems and must conform to the following message standards: Variable Message Format (VMF) Technical Interface Design Plan-Test Edition (TIPD-TE) and all other J-series messages to include link-16.

3.2.3

A Target Location Error should be less than or equal to (<) 10 meters.

3.2.5.1.3

Operator and maintainer embedded and add-on interactive training, with self-paced instruction, duplicating VTUAV system flight performance characteristics, capabilities, and limitations.

3.2.5.1.7

A VTUAV System must be capable of being off-loaded from its transport vehicles and achieving, at a minimum, Mission Capable (MC) status, which is: one GCS, one DLS, one AV, and one MMP, within 30 minutes.

3.2.5.2.2.1

The AV must be capable of launching within 5 minutes or less after being positioned on its launch point on the flight deck.

3.2.5.2.2.3

Following its recovery, the AV must be capable of being moved from the flight deck to its storage point in 5 minutes or less.

3.2.5.2.2.3

The VTUAV System shall incorporate a balanced survivability design approach

3.2.5.2.5

VTUAV System ground components must be capable of operating in ambient air temperatures ranging from -29o Celsius (C)(-20o Fahrenheit (F)) to +57oC (135oF).

3.2.5.3.1.1

The VTUAV System should have a Mean Flight Hours between Operational Mission Critical Failures (MFHBOMCF) >/= 90 hrs).

3.2.5.4.1.1

The VTUAV System should have a BIT Fault Isolation Rate (FI) = 100%.

3.2.5.4.3

The VTUAV System must be capable of being configured for (or de-configured from) sea, ground, or air transport in 1 hours or less.

3.2.5.5

The computer resources of the VTUAV System must be capable of providing a 75 percent growth potential over delivered capability.

3.3.2.1.1
3.3.2.1.2
3.3.2.1.3

With an MMP of at least 300 lbs. at 100% fuel load, the basic AV must have a combat radius of at least 110 nautical miles (nm), be capable of loitering at that combat radius for 5 hours utilizing internal fuel only, and then return to its original launch point without refueling, with a 20 minute fuel reserve calculated at a 10,000 ft MSL, maximum endurance flight profile, under ISA standard day conditions.

3.5.1.2.1

With an MMP of at least 100 lbs., the basic AV must have a combat radius of at least 250 nm, be capable of loitering at that combat radius for 2 hours utilizing internal fuel only, and then return to its original launch point without refueling, with a 20 minute fuel reserve calculated at a 10,000 ft MSL, maximum endurance flight profile, under ISA standard day conditions.

3.5.1.2.1

The basic AV must be capable of conducting VTOL operations at 6000 ft DA from an unprepared land-based site, suitable to conduct air operations without damage to AV or components, with a 300 lb. MMP, 100% fuel load.

3.5.1.2.2

The basic AV must be capable of a continuous, steady state hover, out of ground effect, with a 300 lb. MMP, with a 100% fuel load, at 6000 ft DA.

3.5.1.2.2

The basic AV must be capable of conducting Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) operations at 6000 feet (ft) Density Altitude (DA) from all VTUAV capable ships, with a maximum deck displacement of ±3o pitch and ±5o roll from 0o centerline with a 300 lb. MMP and 100% fuel load.

3.5.1.2.2.1

The basic AV must have a service ceiling on an International Standard Atmosphere (ISA) standard day of 20,000 ft Mean Sea Level (MSL).

3.5.1.2.3

The basic AV will have an operational / cruise airspeed range 200 knots True Airspeed (TAS) under an ISA standard day conditions.

3.5.1.2.4

A mission ready AV must be capable of being emplaced by no more than two people to support and perform the movement of the AV from its prime mover/storage site to the launch/recovery site and then back to the prime mover/storage site.

3.5.1.2.5

The AV must have a spatial location accuracy within 10 m (33 ft) during the in-flight phase of the mission.

3.5.1.2.6

The basic AV must be capable of launching, recovering and if applicable, rotor engagement in 45 knots of wind.

3.5.1.2.7.1

The AV must be capable of operating in ambient air temperatures ranging from -40oC (-40oF) to +65oC (150oF).

3.5.1.2.8.1

The AV must be capable of operating in precipitation measuring 25 mm (1 inch) per hour continuously.

3.5.1.2.8.2

The AV must be capable of transiting through moderate icing conditions and an icing rate detection capability.

3.5.1.2.8.3

The AV must have a USN aviation standard embedded (secure voice capable) communication, Ultra High Frequency radio (UHF)/Very High Frequency radio (VHF) and HF voice and MMP data relay capability.

3.5.1.3.2

The AV must have an Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) Mode I, II, III, IIIC, and IV combat identification system capability, be capable of automatic or manual in-flight reprogramming, and have Mode S and a Precision Location Information (PLI) transponder capability.

3.5.1.3.3

The basic AV must have a minimum payload capacity of at least 300 lbs.

3.5.1.3.8

The basic AV must have an internal payload capacity of at least two cubic feet and a capability to carry and release an external payload.

3.5.1.3.8

The AV must be capable of being pressure fueled and de-fueled.

3.5.1.3.9

The VTUAV System must operate using JP-5, JP-8, and diesel.

3.5.1.3.9

The VTUAV System should have an initial MMP capability that consists of a day/night passive imagery sensor and laser designator with the capability to identify and designate a standard-sized NATO target of 2.3 meters x 2.3 meters from a slant range of 16 kilometers (km).

3.5.2.1

The GCS must be able to import National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED), Digital Feature Analysis Data (DFAD), and Arc Digitized Raster Graphics (ADRG) and scanned hard copy maps.

3.5.3.1

VTUAV ground communications system will provide two UHF radios, two VHF radios, and one HF radio.

3.5.3.3.1

The RDT must be able to receive direct down-link from the AV antenna when within 280 km (150 nm) of the AV.

3.5.4.1

The DLS should provide redundancy for AV Command and Control (C2), be electronically steerable, support multiple frequencies and multiple full-duplex channels simultaneously, be anti-jam with low probability of intercept, be capable of supporting both unidirectional and omni-directional communications simultaneously, and support simultaneous communication with two AVs in different quadrants of the sky at the same time.

3.5.5

With the use of no more than two relay stations (airborne or surface), the DLS must provide a 250 nm radius of operation from controlling GCS to AV and vice versa.

3.5.5

The DLS should allow for future growth to SATCOM data link.

3.5.5

The DLS should provide data distribution (imagery and system data) from the AV to the GCS and RDT, via discrete and selectable frequencies and also provide imagery to "on the move" C2 nodes (e.g. battle command vehicles and C2 helicopters with compatible capabilities).

3.5.5

The AV must have a meteorological sensor with the capability to calculate and report winds aloft, measure temperature (±1o C), relative humidity (±2% between 0% and 80% relative humidity and ±3% between 80% and 100% relative humidity), and barometric pressure (±0.1 inches (3.37 millibars) of mercury.

3.5.1.3

The AV must have the capability for an onboard storage/downlink imagery playback for use during periods of data link interruption.

3.5.1.3

At a distance of 250 nm, and with the use of no more than two communication/data relay stations, the GCS must control at least one AV and MMP.

3.5.3

The VTUAV System will incorporate the combat identification system to enhance battlefield situational awareness and battlefield target identification.

3.5.1.3.5

APPENDIX A

Acronyms List

     

AC

 

Alternating Current

ACE

 

Air Combat Element

ADRG

 

Arc Digitized Raster Graphics

ADT

 

Airborne Data Terminal

AERM

 

Autonomous Emergency Recovery Mode

ALSS

 

Acquisition Logistics Support Specification

ANSI

 

American National Standards Institute

Ao

 

Operational Availability

APMSE

 

Assist. Program Manager, Systems Engineering

ATC

 

Air Traffic Control

AV

 

Aerial Vehicle

AVO

 

Aerial Vehicle Operator

AVSI

 

Aerial Vehicle Standard Interface

BIT

 

Built-In-Test

C2

 

Command & Control

C3

 

Command, Control, Communications

C2W

 

Command & Control Warfare

C4I

 

Command, Control, Communications, Computer and Intelligence

CFE

 

Contractor Furnished Equipment

CIGSS

 

Common Imagery Ground/Surface System

COE

 

Common Operating Environment

CoE

 

Concept of Employment

COTS

 

Commercial Off The Shelf

CFR

 

Code of Federal Regulations

CRT

 

Critical Restore Time

DA

 

Density Altitude

DASC

 

Direct Air Support Center

DC

 

Direct Current

DFAD

 

Digital Feature Analysis Data

DII

 

Defense Information Infrastructure

DLS

 

Data Link Suite

DoD

 

Department of Defense

DoDISS

 

Department of Defense Index of Specifications and Standards

DTED

 

Digital Terrain Elevation Data

E3

 

Electromagnetic Environmental Effects

EMC

 

Electromagnetic Compatibility

EMV

 

Electromagnetic Vulnerability

EME

 

Electromagnetic Environment

EMI

 

Electromagnetic Interference

ESD

 

Electrostatic Discharge

EW

 

Electronic Warfare

FDet

 

Fault Detection Rate

FI

 

Fault Isolation Rate

FLIR

 

Forward Looking Infra-red Radar

FOR

 

Field of Regard

FOV

 

Field Of View

FSCC

 

Fire Support Coordination Center

GCS

 

Ground Control Station

GDT

 

Ground Data Terminal

GFE

 

Government Furnished Equipment

GIC

 

Gabarit International de-Chargement

GPS

 

Global Positioning System

GSE

 

Ground Support Equipment

HERF

 

Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Fuel

HERO

 

Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance

HERP

 

Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Personnel

HF

 

High Frequency

HMMWV

 

High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle

HMT

 

Higher Mobility Trailer

HOL

 

High Order Languages

IAW

 

In Accordance With

I/O

 

Input/Output

ICD

 

Interface Control Documents

IEEE

 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

IFF

 

Identification, Friend or Foe

IMINT

 

Imagery INTelligence

INS

 

Inertial Navigation System

IPT

 

Integrated Product Team

IR

 

Infrared

ISA

 

International Standard Atmosphere

ISR

 

Intelligence, Surveillance, & Reconnaissance

JROCM

 

Joint Requirements Oversight Counsel Memo

JTA

 

Joint Technical Architecture

KW

 

Kilowatts

KPP

 

Key Performance Parameters

LAMPS

 

Light Airborne Multi-purpose System

LOS

 

Line Of Sight

MAGTF

 

Marine Air Ground Task Force

MC

 

Mission Capable

MFHBOMCF

 

Mean Flight Hours Between Operational Mission Critical Failures

MFHBUMA

 

Mean Flight Hours Between Unscheduled Maintenance Actions

MFHBF

 

Mean Flight Hours Between Failure

MIL-STD

 

Military Standard

MLDT

 

Mean Logistics Delay Time

MMF

 

Mobile Maintenance Facility

MMP

 

Modular Mission Payload

MMT

 

Mean Maintenance Time

MODTRAN

   

MOPP

 

Mission Oriented Protective Posture

MPH

 

Miles Per Hour

MPO

 

Mission Payload Operator

MSL

 

Mean Sea Level

MTBF

 

Mean Time Between Failure

MTBM

 

Mean Time Between Maintenance

MTBOMF

 

Mean Time Between Operational Mission Failures

MTMC

 

Military Traffic Management Command Pamphlet?

MTTR

 

Mean Time To Repair

NACSEM

 

National Communications Security Engineering Memorandum

NATO

 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NBC

 

Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical

NDI

 

Non-developmental Item

NIMA

 

National Imagery and Mapping Agency

NRT

 

Near Real Time

NSTISSAM

 

National Security Telecommunications and Information System Security Advisory Memorandum

NTE

 

Not To Exceed

NVD

 

Night Vision Device

NVLAP

 

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

ODC

 

Ozone Depleting Chemicals

OMFTS

 

Operational Maneuver from the Sea

ORD

 

Operational Requirements Document

PLI

 

Precision Location Information

PM

 

Preventative (scheduled) Maintenance

PME

 

Prime Mission Equipment

POL

 

Petroleum, Oil, Lubricants

PROM

 

Programmable Read Only Memory

P-Static

 

Precipitation Static

P3I

 

Pre-Planned Product Improvement

RAM

 

Reliability, Availability, Maintainability

RDT

 

Remote Data Terminal

RF

 

Radio Frequency

RFI

 

Request for Information

ROM

 

Read Only Memory

RSTA

 

Reconnaissance, Surveillance, & Target Acquisition

SACC

 

Supporting Arms Coordination Center

SATCOM

 

Satellite Communication

SE

 

Support Equipment

SEP

 

Spherical Error Probable

SPEC

 

Specification

TAS

 

True Airspeed

TBD

 

To Be Determined

TCDL

 

Tactical Common Data Link

TCS

 

Tactical Control Station

TEMPEST

 

Transient Electromagnetic Pulse Susceptibility Testing

TIPD-TE

 

Technical Interface Design Plan – Test Edition

TLE

 

Target Location Error

TOC

 

Total Ownership Costs

TOS

 

Time On Station

TPWG

 

Test Plan Working Group

UAV

 

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

UHF

 

Ultra-High Frequency

VERTREP

 

VERtical REPlenishment

VHF

 

Very High Frequency

VMF

 

Variable Message Format

VTOL

 

Vertical Takeoff and Landing

VTUAV

 

Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

WRA

 

Weapons Replaceable Assembly