101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Gold Book

Chapter 7

Planning The Air Assault

SECTION 1: AIR ASSAULT PLANNING TOOLS Figure 7-1 shows standard terms used to describe an air movement.

 

Figure 7-1

Note: The term "chalk" is used to describe the individual aircraft and personnel aboard, and the term "load" describes the piece of equipment that the individual aircraft is carrying. Many times the terms are used interchangeably, which is wrong.

 

 

 

SECTION 2: AIRCRAFT ALLOCATION GUIDE.

1. We need to base our planning on realistic assumptions about aircraft availability. And for those who say that it will be different in wartime, note that on 24 February 1991, the Division launched 66 UH-60A Blackhawks and 30 CH-47D Chinooks to seize FOB Cobra during Desert Storm. The following planning factors are the standards to expect (80% Operational Readiness) and plan to use.

Base Organization

Assault Aviation Battalion TF

Assault Aviation Brigade TF

     

AMC

Assault Aviation Battalion Commander

Assault Aviation Brigade Commander

     

Lift Aircraft

   

Light Lift (# UH-60L)

20

60

     

Heavy Lift (# CH-47D)

8

28

     

Support Aircraft

   

Light Spares (# UH-60L)

2

6

     

Heavy Spares (# CH-47D)

2

6

     

C2 (# UH-60C2)

2

2

     

DARRT (# UH-60L)

2

4

     

Medevac (# UH-60A/A)

3

9

     

Casevac (# CH-47D)

2

2

     

TOTAL UH-60A

5

11

     

TOTAL UH-60L

24

69

     

TOTAL CH-47D

12

36

     

TOTAL (# Combined)

41

116

Figure 7-2, Planning Factors

Note:

1. These figures are valid for the initial entry air assault only and assumes no other aircraft will be available for operations immediately following the air assault.

2. Mission requirements prior and subsequent to this air assault will impact on the force ability package.

3. In addition to initial operational readiness assumptions (80% FMC), other factors affecting the ability to regenerate aircraft for subsequent operations include: movement of aviation unit assembly areas, changes to task organization, combat losses, and other mission requirements.

4. Minimum downtime for regeneration is eight hours for pre-planned missions.

SECTION 3: RANGE EFFECTS ON AIRCRAFT ALLOCATION.

1. These numbers will vary based on temperature, humidity, air density, and other factors. But in general, these are very good, conservative planning factors. You may squeeze out more; you will hardly ever get less.

a. All aircrews assigned to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) are bounded by a training restriction of five-hours fighter management under night vision goggles. See fighter management requirements in Chapter 5. The following tables take the number of aircraft allocated (from the previous chart) and break them down into the number of loads available given a distance.

Light serial = 5 x UH-60L

Heavy serial = 4 x CH-47D

150 km (2 Lifts)

Assault Avn Bn TF

Assault Avn Bde TF

     

Light Serials

8 (40xUH-60L total loads)

24 (120xUH-60L total loads)

     

Heavy Serials

4 (16xCH-47D total loads)

14 (56x CH-47D total loads)

     

Duration

4 HRS, 10 MIN

4 HRS, 10 MIN

Table 7-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 km (4 Lifts)

Assault Avn Bn TF

Assault Avn Bde TF

     

Light Serials

16 (80xUH-60L total loads)

48 (240xUH-60L total loads)

     

Heavy Serials

8 (32xCH-47D total loads)

28 (112xCH-47D total loads)

     

Duration

7 HRS, 16 MIN

7 HRS, 16 MIN

Table 7-2

 

50 km (6 Lifts)

Assault Avn Bn TF

Assault Avn Bde TF

     

Light Serials

24 (120xUH-60L total loads)

72 (360xUH-60L total loads)

     

Heavy Serials

12 (48xCH-47D total loads)

42 (168xCH-47D total loads)

     

Duration

9 HRS, 12 MIN

9 HRS, 12 MIN

Table 7-3

Note: Assumes a PZ time of 15 minutes, FARP time of 30 minutes, 90 kts ground speed on ingress, and 120 kts ground speed on egress. Also assumes no aircraft losses beyond what spares can cover.

SECTION 4: BRIGADE ECHELONS FOR AIR ASSAULT.

1. Brigade TFs consist of three distinct echelons: assault, follow-on, and rear. Only the first of these echelons air assaults.

a. Assault echelon. Combined arms forced entry.

(1) The key decision here involves allocation of CH-47Ds. There are not enough to bring in all the heavy loads we would like.

(2) Whenever possible, we need to conduct brigade air assaults with seats out. In combat, you can expect this method to be used. In training, it depends on the risks assessed and controls applied.

(3) Prioritization is a METT-TC decision. It is a command decision. Every element is important, but some pieces are more important than others. If enemy air is a danger, the ADA/LSDIS is needed. If enemy armor is not present, you can accept risk on inserting anti-armor platoons. CSS is almost always an issue; but you may have some other means of getting it than by air assault.

(a) The only thing that must go in is your C2 and shooters. Everything else must be allocated as necessary.

(b) The surest indication you have it about right is if you’re bringing in true combined arms task forces. If everyone’s lined up pretty much by MTOE stovepipes, your METT-TC analysis likely needs work.

b. Assault echelon aircraft allocations.

c. Here is the hard truth: you cannot bring all of this in, except at 100 kilometers or less with the entire assault aviation brigade TF. Thorough planning for air assaults at this maximum distance require detailed planning and precise computations. The 150 kilometer planning factor takes into account best case scenario. With certain common conditions present (frustrated loads, holding patterns, etc.), the 150 kilometer factor is reduced. If you are going with one assault aviation battalion TF or out to 150 kilometers, you must prioritize based on METT-T. Anything in this echelon not air assaulted slips into the follow-on echelon. The following table provides aircraft allocations per unit or equipment type (the distances are radiuses and loads are based on seats out operations). This table will allow the BAE to determine assault echelon allocations given the number of loads available and number of units requested.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION 5: FOLLOW-ON ECHELON. Those elements arriving after the completion of the air assault by USAF airlift and/or Army aviation.

1. HMMWVs, 463L pallets, cargo nets, A-22 bags, fuel and water blivets.

2. Assault echelon elements not able to air assault due to limited numbers of aircraft available.

3. Typical elements:

a. CSS reinforcement (C2, follow-on supplies).

b. Brigade C2 reinforcement (brigade TOC, forward signal team, DS FA battalion CP, ADA battery CP, engineer company CP, MI company team CP, DISE, assault aviation battalion/brigade TAC CP, attack aviation battalion/brigade TAC CP, ANGLICO, FST, CA, PSYOPS, USAF TACP, less elements with assault echelon). Division TAC or other unit C2 nodes may begin flow into the airhead with the follow-on echelon.

c. Maximize use of combat configured loads/preplanned logistics based on mission analysis.

d. Breakdown logistics equipment into smaller operational sections to insure logistic assets are not loaded on one aircraft.

SECTION 6: REAR ECHELON. Those elements arriving by tactical road march.

1. Larger vehicles of all units.

2. Elements of the follow-on echelon not able to enter by airland or airmobile means.

3. Typical elements:

a. Brigade support area forces (battalion field trains).

b. Aviation battalion/brigade ground elements (AVUM, III/V, HQ).

c. Outsized vehicles.

d. Anti-armor platoons and MP (security).

e. Medical support per convoy.

SECTION 7: ABORT CRITERIA.

1. The methodology used in executing an air assault involves setting conditions, providing suppressive fires immediately before and on landing, and continuously monitoring abort criteria from beginning to end.

2. Abort criteria are a change of condition which seriously threatens mission success. As such, they are CCIR relating to any ongoing air assault operation and require command consideration regarding mission continuation. It is important that the AMB clearly defines abort criteria and that the AATFC monitor them throughout conduct of the operation. Figure 7-3 explains the role of abort criteria.

 

 


Figure 7-3

3. Planners establish proposed abort criteria, to assist commanders in deciding when success of the operation is no longer probable. The AATFC retains authority for abort decisions. There are six factors considered to determine abort criteria for air assault missions:

a. Weather. All air assault operations have one thing in common: air assault forces maneuver on the battlefield using the firepower, mobility, and total integration of helicopter assets. Adverse weather conditions make flying unsafe and degrade the effectiveness of the helicopters organic weapon systems. Ambient temperature conditions also must be favorable for AH-64 aircraft. AR 95-1 sets the minimum weather conditions, stated as a ceiling and visibility, for certain types of helicopter missions over certain types of terrain. Weather conditions must be at or above minimums for the entire time that aircraft are flying, and over the entire area in which they will operate, unless waived by the CG due to criticality of a specific combat operation.

b. Aircraft available. The ground tactical plan (GTP) for an air assault operation depends on the rapid massing of combat power at the critical place and time by helicopters. Helicopters are critical to the GTP. Aviation battalions set standard FMC rates for planning purposes. If actual FMC rates fall below the planning figure, the AATF will not be able to build its combat power as quickly as planned. Abort criteria, in terms of aircraft, are set to inform the AATFC when overwhelming combat power may not be achieved.

c. Time. The 101st Airborne Division (AASLT) gains a significant advantage over most military forces in the world by operating at night. Unsophisticated air defense systems rely on visual target tracking and acquisition. Also, some types of combat power, like AC-130 gunship support, are vulnerable during daylight hours. Abort criteria in terms of take-off times are set to ensure that the aircraft are in hostile territory under the cover of darkness. Abort criteria are also made to prevent long delays, which lead to increased fatigue in soldiers.

d. Mission essential combat power. Air assault mission planners use doctrine and experience to determine the minimum combat power including infantry, artillery, and attack helicopters, as well as other assets, necessary to ensure mission success. Abort criteria are used to ensure that friendly forces have the required combat ratio for the operation.

e. Mission criticality. Air assault operations are often conducted as part of a corps level, or higher, attack. The success of other units and future operations may depend on the seizing of the air assault objective. Therefore some air assault operations may proceed despite the presence of circumstances that would normally abort the mission.

f. Enemy. Certain types of enemy activity, especially along flight routes or in the vicinity of LZs or objectives, may abort an air assault mission. Abort criteria are usually stated in terms of the size or type of an enemy unit, or the type of enemy equipment, especially air defense, and the proximity of the enemy to present or future friendly locations.

b. Given a continued advantage of using the primary LZ over the alternate, delay (enroute or at PZ) is preferable to diverting. The AATFC must evaluate the risk of such a delay in light of time, fuel, enemy, and other METT-TC considerations. If an abort criterion is "met", a decision sequence is used prior to aborting the mission.

(1) Delay. If time is available, a mission will be delayed to correct a circumstance that may abort a mission, and set the conditions.

(2) Divert. If time is not available or a delay will not correct an abort criteria, the task force may execute a divert contingency. Examples are to use alternate flight routes, LZs, or objectives.

(3) Abort. If an abort criterion exists, and a delay or diversion to the mission will not correct it, the mission could be aborted by the AATFC.

c. There are two types of abort.

(1) Lift. A lift is aborted when it reaches an aborting criterion. The mission itself is not aborted.

(2) Mission. A mission is aborted when an abort criterion exists for the entire mission, and the AATFC decides to abort.

SECTION 8: AIR ASSAULT PLANNING.

1. Deliberate air assault planning requires detailed and scheduled planning. Below is a guide to planning the deliberate air assault.

 

 

 

 

DAY 1 DAY 2 DAY 3 DAY 4 DAY 5

DIV ISSUES INF BDE AMCM AIRCREW EXECUTE

OPORD TO ISSUES OPORD (5 HRS) BRIEF

INF BDE TO INF BN (24 HRS

AMB AFTER AMCM)

(18 HRS INF BN CDR AFTER AMCM) REHEARSALS

BACKBRIEF TO

INF BDE CDR

 

 

2. Air assault planning always proceeds as part of normal tactical planning. The nature of air assaults requires that five distinct air assault plans be incorporated into the normal orders process. The air mission coordination meeting (AMCM) is how this is done.

3. The five plans are issued in two formats. Their outlines are explained as integrated parts of the OPORD/FRAGO. To highlight the details of the air assault, the five plans are discussed in detail in the air mission brief (AMB). The AMB is the "final contract" between all combined arms forces. Other than pre-approved deviations, all other changes from the brigade AMB must be made by the AATFC. The brigade aviation element (BAE) is responsible for the production of the visual aids associated with each of the following phases:

a. Ground tactical plan (GTP) (Chapter 1).

(1) Plan of action on or away from the objective area.

(2) Basis for all other plans.

(3) Defines role of attack aviation and joint fires to support main effort. (Attack Avn knee board sketch of ground concept of maneuver).

b. Landing plan (Chapter 2).

(1) LZ selection that supports the ground tactical plan (one primary, one alternate per infantry battalion) (LZ sketches).

(2) Place and time in which AATF is most vulnerable.

(3) Controls flow of A/C into and out of LZ (air movement table, graphics).

(4) Defines use of pathfinders/other forces to provide enroute (RP) or terminal guidance (LZ).

(5) LZ overwatch: ground forces (pathfinders, scouts, MI, others), air cavalry, attack aviation, CAS.

    1. Attack aviation tasks: LZ recon (before H-hour), LZ overwatch (at and after

H-hour), close support to ground forces (as ordered and cleared to engage).

c. Air movement plan (Chapter 3).

(1) Air movement table (AMT). Schedule and sequence for movement of troops/equipment/supplies.

(2) Primary/alternate flight routes, start point (SP), release point (RP), air control points (ACPs) (Route cards).

(3) Incorporates attack escorts, lethal and nonlethal suppression of enemy air defense.

(4) Includes joint airspace control plan.

(5) Attack aviation tasks: route recon, armed escort.

(6) MEDEVAC routes, sequencing, and orbits/ROZ’s (included are all locations for CCP’s and bn aid stations).

(7) C2 aircraft routes, sequencing, and orbits/ROZ’s

d. Loading plan (Chapter 4).

(1) Organize on the PZ, not the LZ; ensures loads are on the proper aircraft. (tadpole diagram).

(2) Ensures tactical integrity of each serial; self-contained fighting force.

(3) Includes bump plan.

(4) Includes PZ selection/layout/marking/control.

e. Staging plan (Chapter 4).

(1) Marshaling areas arrival times and staging of soldiers, vehicles, equipment, and supplies (PZ Diagram).

(2) Vehicle/soldier entry points at the PZs.

(3) C2: Brigade XO overall PZ control officer; battalion XOs sub-PZ control officers.

(4) The BAE assists brigade XO in controlling PZs.

(5) FA battalion XO runs the Heavy PZ. Supporting effort infantry battalion XO runs The Light PZ.

(6) Heavy assault LNO assists Heavy PZ control. Assault LNO assists LT PZ control.

SECTION 9: INTEGRATED AIR ASSAULT PLANNING.

1. The brigade aviation element (BAE) includes the TF S3, TF S2, TF S3 Air, all aviation LNOs, and pathfinder team leader.

2. There are nine steps to ensure good integration of a brigade air assault operation.

3. Parallel planning.

a. Air assault planning begins immediately upon receipt of a mission involving an air assault. All personnel involved with air assault planning conduct continuous coordination under the AATF S-3 during COA development in order to ensure air assault considerations are factored into COA development. The following information is sent out with the warning order to allow units the information they need to plan:

(1) Identify aviation resources dedicated to the mission (by heavy and light serials).

(2) Identify likely PZs and LZs; narrow the focus to those that support the evolving brigade scheme of maneuver.

(3) Establish number of lifts/serials for assault echelon and follow-on echelon, plus likely time sequence.

4. From the units and brigade staff, brigade air assault planners receive and share:

(a) LZ confirmations by imagery, Apache/Kiowa Warrior tapes, LZ sketches, photo-T imagery, CAV RECON products, patrols, and higher headquarters intelligence.

(b) Composition of assault, follow-on, and rear echelons by unit.

(c) Nomenclature of every vehicle/sling load to be flown; verify weights and air item availability for heavy and light loads.

(d) Confirmed troop counts by serial for assault and follow-on echelons.

5. Air movement annex to OPORD/OPLAN.

a. Certain air assault planning information must be formally issued to the battalions prior to the AMCM. This information is included in coordinating instructions of the brigade OPORD or in an air movement annex to the OPORD/OPLAN.

(1) Tentative lift and serial composition (Draft AMT).

(2) Suitable PZs and LZs.

(3) Tentative air routes.

(4) LZ imagery (if available).

(5) Any deviations from standard planning factors.

3. Air mission coordination meeting (AMCM).

a. The purpose of the AMCM is to complete coordination between ground and aviation task forces. This is an S-3 level meeting, under the task force S3 that follows the development of battalion ground tactical plans. The AMCM is scheduled to allow sufficient time for maneuver units to have decided on a specific ground course of action, based on the warning order and the standard planning factors. The AATF Commander should have already approved the maneuver COAs at the back briefs. At the AMCM, battalion S3s brief their GTPs. Specifically, battalion S3s show the composition of combat power, by echelon, required to be delivered to each LZ. Attendees include: maneuver and aviation S-3s, S-2s, AMC, BAE, FSOs, and other staff officers as required. The meeting is not complete until the BAE know what loads go to what LZ and in what sequence. The end result is a finalized air movement plan and landing plan. The AMCM is run by the TF S3 Air and chaired by the TF S3. The task force S-3 is the final arbitrator. The AMCM is the true "good idea cut-off point". Changes after the AMCM must be approved by the brigade TF S3, XO or commander. The AMCM agenda follows on page 7-20.

4. Air mission brief (AMB).

a. The AMB is a focused adjunct to the OPORD. It highlights air assault requirements to the AATF’s aviation and ground units. The term "AMB" is used to mean both the written product and the briefing itself. It is a coordinated command and staff effort that is a critical part of tactical planning. The AMB should not be a working meeting except under extreme circumstances. The slightest change in serial separation, landing zones, or anything else can completely alter the rest of the plan. Page 7-29 shows the agenda for the AMB. Page 7-21 depicts the AMB checklist. Page 7-31 to 7-37 describes in detail the seven basic AMB products. All units in the brigade attend the AMB and receive the products.

5. The aircrew brief (AB).

a. The AB is an aviation task force event and is a critical part of the assault task forces’ orders process. The brief covers the essential flight crew actions and aviation planning necessary to successfully accomplish the mission. The AB may incorporate some or all of the serial/pilot briefs (time permitting). The AB is run by the aviation task force S3 and participation by all of the aviation task force staff is critical. Flight crews must fully understand the mission and execution for the air assault to be executed successfully. It involves only aviation units and is analogous to any other unit order. The air mission commander is the final arbitrator of this briefing. The brigade task force S-3 attends as the maneuver unit representative.

6. The serial/pilot brief (S/PB).

a. Serial commanders and/or pilots in command (PIC’s) conduct serial/pilot briefs for their specific units. This briefing serves a final reminder of serial and individual responsibilities for the air assault. Representation from the external units is not required.

7. Pre-execution communication exercise (COMMEX).

a. The purpose of the communications exercise (COMMEX) is to ensure that all commo systems within the brigade TF are operational prior to starting an operation.

b. The bde signal officer (SIGO), ICW the bde S3 publishes the window in which the COMMEX will occur. This is normally a five-hour window. He also annotates which systems will be checked. Normally, the following systems and nets will be exercised.

1. FM command.

2. FM O&I.

3. FM A&I.

    1. 4. ABN.
    2. 5. AM command.

6. AM O&I.

7. TACSAT.

8. CAN 1.

9. MSRT (battalions to brigade).

10. DNVT (BSA to brigade TOC).

11. UXC - 7 FAX.

12. C2 aircraft.

13. PZ control net.

c. During the window published by the SIGO, all units will initiate calls on the above listed communications nets. Signal personnel will maintain a log in order to keep track of the systems/units that report in. The only exception to this reporting system is the FM command net. Battle captains in the bde TOC will initiate a "GUIDONS" call in order to quickly free up the net.

d. Any unit which is incapable of reporting within the specified window will notify the BDE SIGO for assistance and schedule an "alibi call" prior to the start of the operation.

 

8. Brigade rehearsal.

a. The brigade rehearsal for an air assault is conducted sequentially by lifts beginning with the air movement plan, then the landing plan and ground tactical plan. Its purpose is to ensure a common understanding of the overall brigade effort. All commanders must know and understand the AATFC’s mission and intent; and how their mission and intent supports it.

9. PZ rehearsal.

a. The TF brigade XO runs the PZ rehearsal. At a minimum, all flight leads and serial commanders flying the air mission, PZ OICs, and crisis action team (CAT) NCOICs attend. It covers the staging and loading plans of the air assault. Much of the rehearsal centers around pilots’ and hook-up teams' actions in and around the PZs. If not done on the actual ground with the actual loads, terrain models, along with wooden blocks to represent each load, may be used. Hook-up teams, crisis action teams, the PZ control, and each chalk must also rehearse loading and hook-ups, actions for frustrated loads and emergency procedures. As with any rehearsal, maximum participation improves execution.

10. The PZ update brief.

The PZ update brief is the final assembly of key leaders prior to conducting the air assault. It disseminates the most current operational and intelligence information. This update is the final conditions check. The AATFC, AMC, GTC’s, S3’s, TF S2, and PZ OIC will attend. When possible, it starts after the aircraft arrive so pilots can attend. At a minimum, key aviation leaders attend. The agenda and set-up are outlined in figure 7-4 below:

PZ UPDATE BRIEF AGENDA

TIMELINE/AGENDA

TF S3

ENEMY SIT UPDATE

TF S2

OPERATIONS UPDATE

TF S3

AIRSPACE UPDATE

TF S3

ATK/CAV RECON PRODUCTS (Tapes, Photo-T, Imagery, sketches, Debriefs

ATK LNO

-ROUTES

 

-LZs

 

- OBJs

 

COMMO UPDATE

TF SIGO

FINAL CONDITIONS CHECK

TF S3

TIME HACK (PLUGGER)

TF SIGO

CDR’S COMMENTS

AATFC

 

 

11. Commanders communication check. Following the PZ update brief, the AATFC will execute a commanders communications check. This is a complete check, involving commanders and leaders, of all systems and nets to be used during execution of the air assault. The AATFC and key leaders perform their communications checks from the C2 aircraft, while the aviation and ground forces use their organic communications systems.

a. The following chart is a visual representation of the integrated AASLT planning process:

AMCM Agenda

AMCM AGENDA

  • ROLL CALL

TF S-3 AIR

  • INTELLIGENCE UPDATE (Avn Focused)

TF S-2

  • WEATHER (Avn Focused)

SWO

  • GROUND TACTICAL PLAN (AASLT specific)

TF S3

  • LANDING PLAN (by LZ)

TF S3

  • AIR MOVEMENT PLAN (routes)

ASLT LNO

  • ATTACK AVN CONCEPT (Enroute and LZ)

ATK LNO

  • FIRES (PZ, SEAD, LZ Prep.)

FSO

  • C2 PLAN

TF SIGO

  • MEDEVAC/CASEVAC PLAN

HSSO

  • FARP PLAN

ASLT LNO

  • LOAD PLAN (Detailed)

TF S3 AIR

  • REVIEW DECISIONS

TF S3

  • S3 CLOSING COMMENTS

TF S3

AMB Checklist

ROLL CALL_____ TIME ZONE_____ TIME HACK_____ PACKET CHECK____

 

REFERENCES

CAM REG 95-1, ASLT BDE TAC/STAN SOP, BDE AA SOP, AA BATTLE NOTES, DIV TACSOP, FORT CAMPBELL SPECIAL, JOG SERIES NJ 16-11, BDE OPORD_______

 

TASK ORGANIZATION

(Infantry Brigade Task Force)

1. SITUATION.

a. Enemy forces (SYNOPSIS OF OVERALL ENEMY SITUATION) (TF S2)

(1) Air IPB.

(2) Enemy air capability.

(3) Enemy ADA capability.

a. Type/location.

b. Night capability/range.

(4) WEATHER/NOTAMS.

Sunrise:________ Sunset:________

Moonrise:________ Moonset:________

Max % Illum:________ Illum Range:(during AASLT, i.e. 0% - 45%)

NVG Window:________ Ceiling/Vis:________

MAX Temp:________ MAX DA/PA:________

EENT:________ BMNT:________

 

b. Friendly forces: (TF S3).

(1) Mission higher headquarters. (Include cdr's intent)

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

(2) Infantry scheme of maneuver. (TF S3).

(a) BDE/BN

MISSION. (TF S3). ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(b) Bde/bn cdr’s intent. (AATFC). ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(3) Conditions for AASLT. Conditions for ice. _____________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

(4) Mission risk assessment: (TF S3).

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. AVIATION MISSION: (AVN S3).

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

3. EXECUTION.

a. Aviation commander’s intent: (AMC).

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

b. Concept of the aviation operation: (AVN S3).

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

c. AVN tasks to subordinate units: (AVN S3).

(1) Missions to subordinate units.

(a) A/ -101 :__________________________________________

__________________________________________________

(b) B/ -101 :__________________________________________

__________________________________________________

(c) D/ -101 :__________________________________________

__________________________________________________

(d) HHC/ -101 :________________________________________

__________________________________________________

(e) /7-101 :________________________________________

__________________________________________________

(f) /A/6-101 :_______________________________________

__________________________________________________

(g) TM PFDR :_______________________________________

__________________________________________________

(h) 50th MED :________________________________________

__________________________________________________

(i) 2-17 CAV:______________________________________

___________________________________________________

(j) –101 ATK:______________________________________

__________________________________________________

d. Fires (FSO).

(1) Field Artillery. ANNEX I (FIRE SUPPORT GRAPHICS).

(a) Purpose of supporting fires._____________________

______________________________________________

_________________________________________________

(b) Unit/location.___________________________________

_______________________________________________

(c) Priority of Fires._______________________________

________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

(d) SEAD information/targets.________________________

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

(e) LZ prep._________________________________________

_________________________________________________

(2) Close air support (CAS). (ALO).

(a) Purpose/mission._________________________________

____________________________________________________

(b) Coordinating altitude.

Rotary wing:

Fixed wing:

 

(3) Attack aviation. (Attack S3/CDR).

(a) Mission:_________________________________________

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

(b) Concept:_________________________________________
_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

(c) Attack battle positions/ABFs/sectors/routes in/out

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

e. Staging plan. ANNEX A (PZ DIAGRAM) (TF XO).

LIGHT HEAVY

(1) Name/Number........

(2) Coordinates........

(3) Load Time.......... AMT AMT

(4) Take Off Time...... AMT AMT

(5) Markings...........

(6) Control............ CAN1 CAN1

(7) Call Signs/Freq.... PZ CNTRL PZ CNTRL

(8) Landing Form.......

(9) Heading............

(10) Hazards/Go Arounds. AS PER CREWBRIEF

(11) Supported Unit Bump Plan. ANNEX A-1 Coord Ins.

(12) PZ Arrival Times.

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

f. Air movement plan. (ASSLT S3/MSN lead).

(1) Routes/corridors. ANNEX B (ROUTE CARD).

(a) Ingress primary/alternate:________________

(b) Egress primary/alternate:_________________

(c) Others.___________________________________

(2) Enroute hazards.

(3) Abort criteria.

(a) Weather ___________________________________________

(b) Aircraft available ________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

(c) Time _________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

(d) Mission essential combat power ___________________________

_____________________________________________________________

(e) Mission criticality _______________________________________

______________________________________________________________

(f) Enemy _________________________________________________

 

(4) Penetration points.

(5) Enroute formation/rotor sep/angle/airspeeds. As Per Crewbrief.

(6) Deception measures/false insertions.

(7) Air movement plan. ANNEX D.

(8) Cargo Doors. _____________

(9) External Lighting. ------------SOP--------------

(10) ROZ locations.

AASLT C2:____________________________________________

____________________________________________

ATK C2:____________________________________________

___________________________________________

QUICKFIX:____________________________________________

____________________________________________

(11) MEDEVAC/CASEVAC aircraft plan.

_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

(12) Aircraft decontamination plan.

g. Landing plan. ANNEX C (LZ DIAGRAM) (ASSLT S3/MSN Lead).

PRI ALT PRI ALT

(1) Name/number.....

(2) Coordinate......

(3) Land times...... -------------AS PER AMT----------

(4) Markings........

(5) Control.........

(6) Call sign/freq..

(7) LDG form/dir

(8) LZ abort criteria. Based on GTCs guidance.

(9) Go arounds. Flight/single ship - as per crewbrief.*

(10) Departure. As per crewbrief.*

h. LAAGER plan. (ASSLT S3/MSN Lead).

(1) Name/locations.______________________________________

__________________________________________________

(2) Times/REDCON status._________________________________

___________________________________________________

(3) Security plan._______________________________________

_____________________________________________________

(4) Scatter plan.________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

(5) Call forward plan.___________________________________

__________________________________________________

i. Extraction plan. (ASSLT S3/MSN Lead).

j. Coordinating instructions. (Aviation) (ASSLT S3).

(1) MOPP level/NBC warning status. _________________________

(2) M60D control status*.___________________________________

______________________________________________________

(3) ADA status. ___________________________________________

(4) IFF procedures/times. ___________________________________

(5) Chaff/ALQ 144 employment.

(6) NVG specific procedures *. SOP.

(7) VHIRP/IIMC*. As per crew brief.

(8) Mission contingencies*. SOP.

(a) DAARP/SAR/EAE.___________________________________

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

(b) Downed aircraft/SERE/DART.__________________________

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

(c) BDAR._____________________________________________

______________________________________________________

________________________________________________

(9) Spare aircraft procedures.__________________________________

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

(10) Special aircraft equipment/preparation *._____________________

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

(11) PPC*.

(12) Mission brief sheet* (FC OP 355).

(13) Risk assessment form* : completed/signed.

(14) Safety considerations/hazards*.

(15) OPSEC considerations (SOI, kneeboard sheets, maps).

(16) Weather decision plan/times*._____________________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

(17) Debrief location/time.___________________________________

k. Coordinating instructions. (Task force) (TF S3).

4. Service support.

a. Class I (1 CASE MRE'S/5 GALS WATER/SURVIVAL KITS) (TF S4).

b. Class III/V (III/V PLTN LDR).

(1) Minimum fuel. As per crewbrief.

(2) Basic load.

(3) FARP/RRP.

c. Class VIII (HSSO).

(1) Casualty collection point.___________________________

_____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________

(2) Evacuation plan/hospital location.___________________

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

d. MEDEVAC/CASEVAC plan. (HSSO).

5. Command and signal. (TF S3).

a. Command.

(1) A2C2. As per ACO, this AMB, and established tactical flight procedures.

(2) AATFC/location.____________________________________

(3) AVN TF AMC/location._______________________________

(4) ABC/location.______________________________________

(5) Aviation chain of command. __________________

__________________

__________________

As per Serial CoC

b. SIGNAL. (TF SIGO).

(1) Commo card day : ________ (ANNEX _____)

(2) EXECUTION MATRIX (ANNEX ____)

(3) Code words.

MISSION BRIEF BACK

FINAL QUESTIONS

COMMANDERS COMMENTS

 

AMB Agenda

AMB AGENDA

  • Task Organization and Roll Call

AATF S3

  • Time Hack

AATF SIGO

  • Enemy Forces

AATF S2

  • Friendly Forces

AATF S3

  • Infantry Scheme of Maneuver

AATF S3

  • BDE/DN CDRs INTENT

AATFC

  • Task Force Mission/Concept

AATF S3

  • Aviation Mission

ASLT AVN S3

  • Staging Plan

TF XO

  • Loading Plan

AATF S3 Air

  • Air Movement Plan

ASLT S3/ MSN Lead

  • Landing Plan

ASLT S3/ MSN Lead

  • Laager Plan

ASLT S3/ MSN Lead

  • Attack Aviation Mission/Concept

ATK S3/CDR

  • Fires

AATF FSO

  • Tasks to Subordinate Units

AATF S3

  • Coordinating Instructions

AATF S3

  • Service Support (FARP Plan)

ASLT AVN S4

  • Medevac/Casevac Plan

HSSO/Med. Co. Cdr

  • Command

AATF S3

  • Signal
  • Operational Risk Assessment

AATF SIGO

AATFS3

  • AATFC Comments

AATFC

 

The Seven Basic AMB Documents

1. Seven basic documents form the backbone of the AMB. These are:

a. The air movement table (AMT), which regulates the sequence of flight operations from PZ to LZ.

b. The tadpole diagram, which describes lift compositions. One is prepared for each lift.

c. The communications card, an all-in-one summary of call-signs and nets.

d. The PZ diagram, which graphically shows the pickup zone. One is prepared for each PZ.

e. LZ diagram, which depicts the landing zone. One is prepared for each

primary and alternate LZ. Pilots must have these on their kneeboards.

f. Knee board sketches for attack aviation. Each infantry battalion S3

prepares scheme of maneuver concept sketches about the size of an aviators knee board for each company-sized element in his task force. The infantry battalion S3 provides these concept sketches to the attack aviation S3 at the brigade task Force rehearsal. These sketches are carried by every AH-64 pilot to counter the potential for fratricide during close support operations. These concept sketches are also included as enclosures to the AMB.

g. Route cards for every ingress and egress route on the AASLT.

2. The air assault execution checklist, the mission checklist for air assault operations, permits brief, informative radio transmissions on crowded nets. An example execution checklist is included as an eighth document, although it will not be available at the AMB. A draft checklist will be available at the TF rehearsal, with the final version distributed before execution.

3. If the mission involves a FARP or laager area/site, sketches of each should be included as a document of the AMB and should be in the knee board packet.

4. The AATF staff should include fire support coordination measures and a GTP overlay in the AMB packet.