Annex E. International Armaments Strategy
Army Science and Technology Master Plan (ASTMP 1997)


T. Modeling and Simulation

Modeling and simulation objectives, as defined for this technology area, are critical for achieving the JCS vision for seamless integration of mission planning and rehearsal and effective execution required for dominant maneuver and the application of precision forces to overwhelming effect. Further, international cooperation will be essential. Standardization of distributed interactive simulation (DIS), development of common standards for computer generated forces, and a consistent and common of the battlespace based on a high-fidelity representation of the physical environment will be crucial to effective employment and interoperabiltiy of coalition forces. Table E.II-19 summarizes capabilities and potential opportunities for each technical subarea.

Table E.II-19. Modelling and Simulation

T. MODELING AND SIMULATION UNITED KINGDOM FRANCE GERMANY OTHER COUNTRIES JAPAN PACIFIC RIM FSU
SIMULATION INTERCONNECTION NATO countries active in standardization of Distributed Interactive Simulation Distributed industrial enterprises Australia New Zealand DIS  
SIMULATION INFORMATION Dynamic training simulation Dynamic training simulation Battle modeling and simulation Canada Netherlands Battle modeling and simulation VR    
SIMULATION REPRESENTATION Modeling and simulation Modeling and simulation Modeling and simulation Netherlands Modeling and simulation Distributed enterprises    
SIMULATION INTERFACES VR VR Canada VR 3D visualization
Italy Tactile

Netherlands Visualization

Sweden Virtual reality
VR    

In addition to Canada, the UK, Australia and New Zealand, all of whom participate with the U.S. in TTCP activity highlighted below, France, and Germany have strong capabilities in modeling and simulation, and in the underlying information systems technologies required to distribute and process the information. Japan has had an extensive program aimed at modeling, simulation, and management of large, complex, distributed enterprises. Other countries, including those of Israel cited in E-II.I (Battlespace Environment) and Q (Sensors) may also contribute.

Several factors are fostering rapid growth and internationalization of Simulation Information and Representation. Coalition operations as a dominant theme in the use of military force. The threat to these forces, geographically-dispersed and increasingly capable technologically, demands more effective transnational mission planning and rehearsal. The same requirements and capabilities are, to only a slightly lesser extent reflected in the operations of large multinational companies. World-wide availability of low-cost powerful information management systems are allowing exchange of data and promoting standardization of data and models for terrain, weather, and environmental effects. The resulting advances will contribute directly to improved interoperability of coalition forces.

In the area of simulator interfaces, leading technologies are found primarily in those countries that have been traditionally strong in dynamic training and simulation--Canada (which is also developing significant capabilities in data visualization), the UK, France, and Germany, and in Japan, which is actively pursuing the development of VR for industrial applications, including visualization of complex systems and enterprises.