Chapter I Strategy and Overview
Army Science and Technology Master Plan (ASTMP 1997)


H. The Army Legacy

The Army Science and Technology Master Plan projects the development and maturation of technologies for the Army's future systems and system upgrades. Indeed, it is this transition of technology into affordable systems and capabilities which makes the science and technology program a sound investment. Over the last 50 years, Army R&D has developed and fielded a number of significant product and process technologies, some of which are highlighted in Figure I-39.

Figure I-39. Army R&D Accomplishments
1990 Hypertonic saline dexton effectively resuscitates after significant hemorrhage, and poses no hazard to renal function
CORE-LOC concrete armor unit for breakwaters
Full color thin film electroluminescent one million pixel flat panel display
Composite hull for armored vehicles
Produced enzymatically active human acetylcholinesterase using recombinant DNA techniques
Airborne standoff minefield detection system
Second generation FLIRs
Food and drug administration licensure of halofantrine
Insects for biological control of problem aquatic plants
Rock rubble anti-penetration shielding
Day/night adverse weather pilotage system (D/NAPS)
Gene code in drug resistant malaria strains analogous to that in human cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs
Intrinsic chemical markers for food safety to validate the safety (i.e., sterility) of thermoprocessed particulate foods
1980 AIDS diagnostic and staging schemes published for wide usage
Resin-based, non-toxic skin decontamination kit fielded
Pretreatment, improved antitode and anticonvulsant therapy for nerve agent poisoning
Ballistic-laser protective spectacles fielded
High precision missile terminal imaging
Mefloquine, antimalarial drug fielded
All Composite Aircraft demonstrated
Image processing
Personnel selection, classification, and assignment for formation of volunteer Army
Wire strike protection system fielded
1970 Reverse osmosis water purification fielded
Frequency hopping radios
Fiberoptics applications: Fly-by-light, FOG-M, communications
Lightweight, flexible body armor
Meals, ready to eat (MRE)
High burn rate solid rocket fuel technology
First practical tilt rotor system demonstrated
Superlattice electronics
First generation thermal imager fielded
1960 Meningitis vaccine developed
Individual and vehicle ceramic armor
Inertial surveying for field artillery demonstrated
Freeze dried compressed foods introduced
Fast Fourier transform developed
Sulfamylon, an antibacterial cream, development for treatment of burns
First starlight scope fielded
Laser rangefinder
Rubella virus (German measles) isolated
Laser semiactive guidance invented and demonstrated
1950 Global standard for time measurement
Photolithographic process for printed circuit boards
First weather/communications satellites
Solar cells for satellites
Redstone rocket -- Army first in space
Turbine power for helicopter fielded
Dehydration/freeze drying of foods made practical
Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation developed
Image intensifier scope
T1-6A1-4V titanium alloy for aircraft developed
1940 Iodine tables for individual water purification
First specific cure for typhoid fever
First synthetic quartz
ENIAC, first modern electronic computer
First supersonic wind tunnel
Atomic bomb fielded
Helicopter first flown
Engine for first American jet fighter
Whole blood preservation
Proximity fuze

Figures I-40 to I-42 highlight some of the S&T contributions to Army aviation, tanks, and howitzers.

Figure I-40. Aviation: Past and Future

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Figure I-41. S&T Contributions to Abrams

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Figure I-42. Howitzers: Past and Future

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The impact of these technologies on military operations has been significant. Army S&T products have helped win the Cold War, Operation Just Cause, and Desert Storm. Beginning in the 1980s, past Army investments from basic science through subsystem components have made the U.S. leader in night vision capability (see Figure I-43). Today's investments will likewise lead to compact power for the 21st Century (see Figure I-44).

Figure I-43. Evolution of 2nd Gen FLIR Technology

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Figure I-44. The Future of Compact Power Technology

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