News 1998 Army Science and Technology Master Plan



TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION
(Vol. I, Ch. III)

AVIATION (Section D)

III.D.01—Rotorcraft Pilot’s Associate (RPA) ATD.  By FY99, develop and demonstrate through simulation and flight test a cooperative man–machine system that synergistically integrates revolutionary mission equipment package technologies, high–speed data fusion processing, cognitive decision aiding knowledge–based systems, and an advanced pilotage sensor and display to achieve maximum mission effectiveness and survivability of our combat helicopter forces. The product will contribute greatly to the pilot’s ability to "see and comprehend the battlefield" in all conditions; rapidly collect, synthesize, and disseminate battlefield information; and take immediate and effective actions. Measures of performance beyond a Comanche–like baseline during day/night, clear, and adverse weather battlefield conditions include reduction in mission losses by 30–60 percent, increased targets destroyed by 50–150 percent, and a reduction in mission timelines by 20–30 percent. Milestones include system preliminary design 3Q95, software build #1 4Q95, simulation evaluation 2Q97, and flight test 3Q98.

Supports: RAH–66 Comanche, AH–64 Enhanced Apache, and system upgrades; Quiet Night; Early Entry Lethality and Survivability (EELS), Depth and Simultaneous Attack (D&SA), Mounted Battlespace (MBS), DBS, Battle Command (BC), and Combat Service Support (CSS) Battle Labs; and dual–use potential for general and commercial aviation, law enforcement, mass transit, etc.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

LTC George Dimitrov
AATD
(757) 878–2770
DSN: 927–2770
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.03—Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission II (ART II). Demonstrate a "quantum leap" in transmission system technology through the integration of emerging technologies in materials, structures, mechanical components, dynamics, acoustics, lubrication, and manufacturing processes. ART II will use advanced component technologies such as split–torque transmission design, improved gear tooth geometry, low–volume lube systems, and corrosion resistant housing materials, which have been developed under ART I, industry independent research and development (IR&D), or research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) 6.2 programs, and integrate them into a full–scale demonstration of critical transmission subsystems. Candidate subsystems include lube system and accessory drives, input module, tail rotor drive system, or main gear box. Technologies will be demonstrated through detail design (by FY98), fabrication (by FY99), and subsystem performance, endurance, and noise testing (by FY00). The specific technology objectives to be demonstrated under ART II by FY00 will be 25 percent weight reduction, 10–decibel (dB) noise reduction, increase in mean time between repairs to 12,000 hours, and improved producibility. In terms of warfighting capabilities and payoffs, ART II technology will provide 15 percent increase in range or 25 percent increase in payload from an AH–64 baseline, significantly improved readiness, and improvements in maneuverability and agility and operations and support (O&S) cost reduction.

Supports: Joint Transport Rotorcraft (JTR); AH–64 Enhanced Apache; RAH–66 Comanche; system upgrades for naval aircraft (common light vertical system replacement); EELS, D&SA, MBS, and CSS Battle Labs; and dual–use potential for both general and commercial aviation.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Hank Morrow
ATCOM/AATD
(804) 878–4130
DSN: 927–4130
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.04—Helicopter Active Control Technology (HACT).  By FY02, demonstrate a 50 percent reduction in the probability of degraded handling qualities due to flight control system failures, a 60 percent improvement in weapons pointing accuracy, a 50 percent increase in agility and maneuverability, and a 30 percent reduction in flight control system flight test development time. HACT will demonstrate integrated, state–of–the–art rotorcraft flight control technologies with exploitation of advanced fixed–wing hardware components and architectures. The objective is to demonstrate through simulation and flight test second–generation rotorcraft digital fly–by–wire/light control systems with fault–tolerant architectures, including carefree maneuvering, task–compliant control laws, and integrated fire/fuel/flight control capabilities, designed with robust control law design methods. The program will overcome technical barriers such as the lack of knowledge of optimal rotorcraft response types; inadequate techniques for sensing the onset of envelope limits, cueing the pilot, or limiting pilot inputs; inadequate air vehicle math modeling for high–bandwidth flight control; inadequate flight control system design, optimization, and validation techniques; and lack of knowledge in the optimum functional integration of flight control, weapon systems, and pilot interface. Program milestones are: FY99—complete hardware and software preliminary design; FY00—fabricate hardware and perform software validation and verification and hardware–in–the–loop (HITL) simulation; and FY02—integrate flight control system with flight test vehicle. Payoffs of the HACT program will include capability improvements in all–weather/night mission performance, flight safety, and development time/cost that contribute to a 4 percent reduction in RDT&E costs, a 65 percent increase in maneuverability and agility, and a 20 percent reduction in major accident rate.

Supports: JTR, RAH–66 Comanche, AH–64 Apache, and DoD rotorcraft system upgrades.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Wayne Mantay
ATCOM/AFDD
(804) 864–3953
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.09—Future Missile Technology Integration (FMTI).  By FY98, demonstrate lightweight, fire–and–forget, air–to–air, multirole missile technology in support of GTG missions. Missile system must include the integration of common guidance and control (G&C), propulsion, airframe and warhead technologies capable of performing in high clutter/obscurants, day/night adverse weather environments, and under countermeasure (CM) conditions. Missile system performance (i.e., range, speed, lethality) must exceed current baseline systems.

Supports: Bradley, Follow–On–To–TOW(FOTT), Hellfire III, HWMMV, RAH–66 Comanche, and AH–64 Enhanced Apache.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

James Bradas
MICOM
(205) 876–5935
DSN: 746–5935
Irena Szkrybalo
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.12—Advanced Helicopter Pilotage Phase I/II.  Develop and demonstrate advanced night vision pilotage technology and revolutionary helmet–mounted display (HMDs) technology for night/adverse weather helicopter pilotage. By FY95, develop image intensified (I2) sensor and fast (60 hertz (Hz)) focal plane array (FPA) for wide filed–of–view (FOV) forward–looking infrared (FLIR). By FY96, conduct flight demonstration and evaluation of sensor technology for wide FOV FLIR and I2. By FY98, demonstrate ultra–wide FOV (40–80 degrees) night pilotage system—HMDs and dual–spectrum (IR and I2) sensors in a single turret—to provide a significant reduction in pilot cognitive and physical work load.

Supports: MBS, D&SA, BC, and EELS Battle Labs; RAH–66 Comanche; Enhanced Apache; Special Operations Aircraft; and RPA ATD.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Phil Perconti
CERDEC/NVESD
(703) 704–1369
DSN: 654–1369
Rob Saunders
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.13—Multispectral Countermeasures (MSCM) ATD.  This project will demonstrate advances in laser technology, energy transmission, and jamming techniques for an all laser solution to infrared countermeasures (IRCM) and as a preplanned product improvement (P3I) to the Advanced Threat Infrared Countermeasure (ATIRCM) System/Common Missile Warning System (CMWS). These improvements will provide the capability to counter both present and future multicolor imaging FPA and nonimaging missile seekers. A tunable multiline laser with a fiber–optic transmission line and advanced detection and jamming algorithms will be live–fire tested using the ATIRCM testbed. The goal is a 4x reduction in laser jam head volume, 35 pounds in weight reduction, greater than 2x reduction in ATIRCM/CMWS power consumption, and a 6x improvement in jam–to–signal ratio. By FY97, complete module testing and evaluation of competitive solid state mid–IR laser technologies, initiate jamming algorithm enhancements, and fiber–optic coupling design. By FY98, integrate laser, fiber–optic coupler, tracker, and advanced jammer algorithms, and conduct distributed interactive simulation (DIS) using the Communications–Electronics Command (CECOM) Survivability Integration Laboratory (SIL) and the Fort Rucker cockpit testbed. By FY99, conduct live–fire cable car test and captive seeker tests to demonstrate a CM capability against advanced imaging IR missiles and other secondary threats to rotary–wing aircraft. Demonstrate antitank guided missile (ATGM) HTI to ground vehicles.

Supports: Air Maneuver, MBS, D&SA, and BC Battle Labs; PM–AEC Tri–Service ATIRCM/CMWS; PM–GSI Ground Combat Vehicle Multispectral Imagery (MSI) Warning and IRCM; and the proposed Integrated Situational Awareness and Countermeasures (ISACM) ATD.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Ted Doepel
CERDEC/NVESD
(703) 704–1216
DSN: 654–1216
Rob Saunders
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.14—Air/Land Enhanced Reconnaissance and Targeting (ALERT) ATD.  ALERT will demonstrate on–the–move (OTM), automatic aided target acquisition and enhanced identification via the use of a second–generation FLIR/multifunction laser sensor suite for application to future aviation assets, which do not have radar, and secondarily to ground assets. ALERT will leverage ongoing Air Force and Defense Advanced Research Proejcts Agency (DARPA) developments for search OTM automatic target recognition (ATR), including the use of temporal FLIR processing for moving target indicator (MTI). This approach will also enable application of the ATR capability to all weapons systems with integrated FLIR/laser sensors. The demonstration will be a real–time, fully operational flying testbed emulation of all modes of the basic RAH–66 target acquisition system. By FY98, collect OTM data for use in constructive and virtual simulation. By FY99, demonstrate baseline OTM performance using second–generation FLIR and standard rangefinding mode. By FY00, integrate laser range mapping capability to demonstrate OTM aided target acquisition with acceptable false alarms as a lower cost alternative to FLIR/radar fusion. By FY01, integrate laser profiling capability to demonstrate automatic acquisition and identification.

Supports: MBS, D&SA, BC, and EELS Battle Labs; RAH–66 Comanche; and AH–64C/D Apache.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Rich Wright
CERDEC/NVESD
(703) 704–1918
DSN: 654–1918
Rob Saunders
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.15—Low–Cost Precision Kill (LCPK) 2.75–Inch Guided Rocket.  By the end of FY98, develop and demonstrate through HWIL simulation and captive field test using best available seeker/sensors, inertial instrumentation, controller characterizations, and launch platform integration technologies a low–cost, accurate (1–meter (m) Concept Experimentation Program (CEP)) G&C package concept for the 2.75–inch rocket that provides a standoff range, surgical strike capability against specified nontank point targets. This capability will provide for a high, single–shot probability of hit against long–range targets, exceeding the current unguided 2.75–inch rocket baseline by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude, thereby reducing the cost/kill, minimizing collateral damage, and greatly increasing the number of stowed kills. Fratricide will be reduced to a minimum by use of guidance techniques allowing postlaunch adjustment of the rocket’s point of impact. Low cost will be achieved by the combination of proven techniques with innovative sensor and control mechanizations and manufacturing processes to support a two–thirds reduction in manufacturing costs compared to current guided missiles.

Supports: EELS, D&SA, and CSS Battle Labs; Hydra–70 Improvement; Apache; Kiowa Warrior; Avenger; Bradley; SOF; and Rapid Force Projection Initiative (RFPI) ACTD.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Charles L. Lewis
MICOM
(205) 876–7663
DSN: 746–7663
Irena Szkrybalo
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
COL Jesse Danielson
ATZD–CD
(334) 255–3203
DSN: 558–3203

 

 

III.D.16—Rotary–Wing Structures Technology (RWST).  By FY01, fabricate and demonstrate advanced lightweight, tailorable structures and ballistically tolerant airframe configurations that incorporate state of the art computer design/analysis techniques, improved test methods, and affordable fabrication processes. The technology objectives are to increase structural efficiency by 15%, improve structural loads prediction accuracy to 75% and reduce costs by 25% without adversely impacting airframe signature. By FY98, develop and demonstrate manufacturing process feedback algorithms to actively control the cure state of composite resins to reduce problems with porosity, degree of cure, and fiber volume fraction. By FY99, demonstrate fully composite primary structural joints to reduce the manufacturing labor for large composite components and increase the structural efficiency, and provide validated strength and fatigue life methodologies for rotorcraft composite structures. By FY00, demonstrate adaptive, out–of–autoclave tooling with preferential heating to optimize the cure cycle of cocured composite elements of highly variable thickness. Exploit emerging technologies in nondestructive inspection , miniature sensors for manufacturing process control, and modeling/virtual prototyping for reducing development time and cost.

Demonstrate by FY01, advanced airframe sections which are tailored for structural efficiency, affordable producibility, and field supportability. These goals support the systems payoffs of 55% increase in range or 36% increase in payload, 20% increase in reliability, 10% improvement in maintainability, 6% reduction in RDT&E costs, 15% reduction in procurement costs, and 5% reduction in O&S costs for utility type rotorcraft.

Supports: Primary emphasis provides technology options to the UH–60, AH–64, Improved Cargo Helicopter (ICH), RAH–66 & SOA upgrades, future air vehicles (Joint Transport Rotorcraft (JTR)), collaborative technology; and the Battle Lab FOCs (EEL, CSS, DSA, DBS and MTD). Contributes to RWV TDA objectives, goals, and payoffs.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Graydon Ellicott
ATCOM/AATD
(804) 878–5921
DSN: 927–5921
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.17—Advanced Rotorcraft Aeromechanics Technologies (ARCAT).  By FY00, conduct research and development to achieve technical objectives by increasing maximum blade loading 8%, increasing rotor aerodynamic efficiency 3%, reducing aerodynamic adverse forces by 5%, reducing aircraft loads and vibration loads by 20%, reducing acoustic radiation by 4db, increasing inherent rotor lag damping 33%, and increasing rotorcraft aeromechanics predictive effectiveness to 65%. Results will be achieved by addressing technical barriers of airfoil stall, high unsteady airloads, blade–vortex interaction, highly interacting aerodynamics phenomena, complex aeroelastic and structural dynamics characteristics, and limited analytical prediction methods and design tools. Concepts include application of on–blade active control to increase rotor performance and aerodynamic efficiency, reduce BVI noise, blade loads and vehicle vibration at the source; optimizing the configuration geometry of the rotor blade and introducing advanced airfoil concepts to increase aerodynamic efficiency, and maximum blade loading; and vigorously integrating and validating advanced analytical tools such as CFD, finite element structural models, and advanced computational solution techniques to effectively advance rotorcraft aeromechanics technology. By FY97, exploit concepts for smart materials active on–blade aerodynamic controls. By FY98, simulate high–lift, low–energy, periodic–blowing airfoil design; evaluate practical Navier–Stokes CFD solver for rotorcraft interaction aerodynamics; and demonstrate model–scale, on–blade active control rotor concepts for reduced vibration and noise. By FY99, demonstrate integrated CFD/finite–element structures rotorcraft modeling. By FY00, demonstrate concepts towards elimination of conventional rotor lag dampers through the application of smart structures. Achievement of aeromechanics technology objectives will contribute to rotorcraft system payoffs in range, payload, cruise speed, maneuverability/agility, reliability, maintainability, and reduced RDT&E, procurement, and O&S costs.

Supports: RAH–66, AH–64, and Fielded System Upgrades, Next Generation Cargo Vehicles (Joint Transport Rotorcraft), collaborative technologies, and Battle Lab FOCs for EELS, CSS, D&SA, DBS and MTD Battle Labs. Contributes to RWV TDA objectives, goals, and payoffs.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Wayne Mantay
ATCOM/AFDD
(804) 864–3953
DSN:
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.18—Subsystem Technology for Affordability and Supportability (STAS).  Demonstrate subsystems technologies directly affecting the affordability and supportability of Army Aviation. Addresses technical barriers associated with advanced, digitized maintenance concepts, and real–time, on–board integrated diagnostics. The effort supports the advanced maintenance concept of "Digitized Aviation Logistics" to automate maintenance and move toward an integrated, digitized, maintenance information network. The expected benefits from this STO are reductions in Mean Time to Repair (MTTR), No Evidence of Failure (NEOF) removals, and spare parts consumption, resulting in overall reductions in system life cycle cost and enhanced mission effectiveness. Pursuits include on–board as well as ground–based hardware and software concepts designed to assist the maintainer in diagnosing system faults and recording and analyzing maintenance data and information. On–aircraft technologies will include advanced diagnostic sensors, signal processing algorithms, high–density storage, and intelligent decision aids. Ship–side diagnostic and maintenance actions will integrate laptop and body–worn electronic aids, advanced displays, knowledge–based software systems, personal viewing devices, voice recognition technologies, and telemaintenance network. By FY98, demonstrate seeded fault validation testing. By FY99, demonstrate Fuzzy Logic Fault Isolation technique aid. By FY00, demonstrate dynamic component fault detectors and virtual maintenance tool. Supports reduced MTTR across all systems by 15%, contributing directly to the rotary wing vehicle TDA goal of 25% reduction in maintenance costs per flight hour and payoffs of 10% improvement in maintainability, 20% increase in reliability, and 5% reduction in O&S costs.

Supports: AH–64, UH–60, RAH–66 upgrades; ICH and JTR developments; other service and civil rotorcraft fleet.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Gene Birocco
ATCOM/AATD
(804) 878–3008
DSN: 927–3008
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.19—Subsystem Technology for Infrared Reduction (STIRR).  The focus of this STO is on the development, integration, and demonstration of improved Rotary Wing Vehicle (RWV) survivability through total aircraft thermal signature management. Technology objectives aimed at selectively reducing and balancing both the thermal emissions and engine /plume contributors to total aircraft IR signature are key components of this STO. Advances in infrared technologies that include the development of partial and full imaging capabilities on near–term threat missile systems, coupled with the proliferation of older yet still lethal surface–to–air missile systems have resulted in the need for a better equipped, lower IR signature aircraft. Concurrent with the increasingly lethal battlefield, today’s fleet aircraft are assuming additional responsibilities that often result in additional on–board "heat–producing" equipment and greater engine power requirements.

Several technology initiatives have been identified as priorities based on current and expected future infrared advancements. By FY99, achieve development and measurement of advanced, multispectral (visual–through–far–IR) airframe coatings that are compatible with radar absorbing materials/structures, develop state–of–the–art, low–cost, lightweight thermal insulating materials,and conduct efforts to cool helicopter engine/plume. By FY00, advanced engine suppression concepts will be fabricated and demonstrated on both a subscale and full–scale level. Balanced thermal signature reduction will be achieved and demonstrated on an RWV by FY01. A goal of 35% reduction in aircraft IR signature is attainable and anticipated, which will support an RWV payoff of 40% increase in the probability of survival.

Supports: AH–64, UH–60, RAH–66 upgrades, ICH and JTR developments as well as other service aircraft.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Gene Birocco
ATCOM/AATD
(804) 878–3008
DSN: 927–3008
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.20p—Third–Generation Advanced Rotor Demonstration (3rd GARD).  By FY04, develop and demonstrate the next generation rotor system to exploit the full potential of advanced blade configurations and active control systems. 3rd GARD will advance rotor concepts beyond current performance limits through high lift airfoils/devices, tailored planforms and tip shapes, elastic/dynamic tailoring, active on–blade control methods, and signature reduction techniques. These efforts will achieve technical objectives of increasing maximum blade loading 16%, increasing rotor aerodynamic efficiency 6%, reducing aircraft loads and vibration loads by 40%, and reducing acoustic radiation by 7db. By FY01, conduct advanced active control rotor design. By FY02, initiate test article fabrication. By FY03, complete test article structural tests, and initiate wind tunnel testing. By FY04, complete ground testing, and initiate flight test evaluation of technology. These goals contribute to the RWV TDA system level payoffs of 91% increase in range or 66% increase in payload, 6% increase in cruise speed, 65% increase in maneuverability/agility, 20% increase in reliability, and 21% reduction in O&S costs for attack rotorcraft.

Supports: RAH–66, AH–64, and Fielded System Upgrades, Next Generation Cargo Vehicles (Joint Transport Rotorcraft), collaborative technologies, and Battle Lab FOCs for EELS, CSS, D&SA, DBS and MTD Battle Labs. Contributes to RWV TDA objective, goals and payoffs.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Clark D. Mikkelsen
MICOM
(205) 876–3370
DSN: 746–3370
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.21p—Full–Spectrum Threat Protection (FSTP).  By FY05, demonstrate on a fielded AH–64 Apache helicopter the synergistic benefits that can be obtained by integrating state–of–the–art technologies related to advanced active electronic warfare and decoy CM, advanced passive signature reduction technology and advanced air crew situational awareness and tactics. FSTP will capitalize on existing and in–process technical developments while identifying and pursuing advanced technologies necessary to support areas where advanced threat development is expected to surpass current capabilities. The primary challenge of this STO is to integrate active and passive CM that can produce a mission effective, survivable rotary wing vehicle that is both supportable and affordable. By FY02, select state–of–the art active/passive CM, aircrew situational awareness concepts and develop preliminary system design. By FY03, perform hardware fabrication and initial software development. By FY04, perform hot bench integration and subsystem flight test. By FY05, perform system flight test and simulation validation demo. FSTP will integrate passive features such as radar absorbing airframe and rotor structures, advance canopy and sensor window treatments, innovative IR suppressors, multispectral paints and coatings, lightweight insulative materials, and low glint canopy coatings along with the Advanced Threat Radar Jammer (ATRJ) and the Advanced Threat Infrared Countermeasure (ATIRCM) systems. These technologies will support achievement of the rotary wing 2005 TDA technology goals of a 40% reduction in radar cross section signature, a 50% reduction in infrared signature, and a 55% reduction in the visual/electro–optical signature. In turn, these will contribute to the system payoff of 60% increase in probability of survival. A 50% increase in active aircraft survivability equipment effectivenesss will also be achieved.

Supports: UH–60, AH–64, Improved Cargo Helicopter, and future Comanche upgrades and future systems, e.g., Joint Transport Rotorcraft (JTR). Supports MTD, DSA, EEL, CSS, and BC Battle Labs, and contributes to the RWV TDA objectives, goals and payoffs.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Gene Birocco
ATCOM/AATD
(804) 878–3008
DSN: 927–3008
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.22p—On–Board Integrated Diagnostic System (OBIDS).  By FY04, demonstrate advanced diagnostics and prognostics on an operational helicopter with a high level of on–board systems integration to interface with the maintenance infrastructure. This program will highlight cost benefits and safety improvements. Systems assessments will include operational issues, training requirements and return on investment as well as expected maintainability and availability improvements. By FY00, initiate development contract. By FY01, complete preliminary and critical design reviews. By FY02, conduct aircraft modifications. By FY03, conduct safety of flight reviews, flight tests, and extended user operations. By FY04, reconfigure aircraft and issue final report. Key technologies will include failure detection, fault isolation and trending, performance and life use monitoring, condition based maintenance and prognostic methods. Related DoD initiatives include AI software, acoustic sensing, electronic devices and human–system interface. The improved diagnostics will affect No Evidence of Failure (NEOF) removals, false removals, flight mission aborts, flight safety, maintenance downtime, and availability. Logistics will be affected through spare management, engine R&R rates, soft Time Between Overhaul (TBO)/part life extension, and early corrosion and fatigue detection. A combination of DoD S&T, IR&D and commercial (NDI) technologies and products will be integrated for this technology demonstration.

Supports reduced maintenance logistics requirements by 15% or greater, contributing directly to Rotary Wing Vehicle TDA goal of 50% reduction in maintenance costs/flight–hour and payoffs of 20% improvements in maintainability, 45% increase in reliability, and 10% reduction in O&S costs.

Supports: AH–64, UH–60, RAH–66 upgrades; ICH and JTR developments; other service and civil rotorcraft fleet.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Jack Tansey
ATCOM/AATD
(804) 878–4108
DSN: 927–4108
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.23p—Hellfire III.  By FY01 demonstrate an improved Hellfire missile, that remains compatible with current and future hellfire launchers, at a possible reduction in weight or cost. The Hellfire III missile must maintain laser–like precision strike capability while combining millimeter wave–like fire and forget capability at 8 km and in adverse weather/obscurants. The technology demonstration will utilize enhancements in propulsion, warhead, and aerodynamic technologies to allow missions to be performed at extended ranges (12 km), at reduced times of flight, and on a greater variety of target sets. These improvements to the Hellfire missile system will not adversely affect the operational effectiveness of the transit platform.

Supports: Hellfire III.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

James Bradas
MICOM
(205) 876–5935
DSN: 746–5935
Irena Szkrybalo
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.24p—Low–Cost Precision Kill (LCPK).  By 2001 develop and demonstrate innovative strapdown (nongimballed) seekers, miniature inertial devices, control systems, microprocessor and integration technologies to produce a low cost, accurate (1m CEP) G&C retrofit package for the 2.75 inch Hydra–70 rocket. This will provide a standoff range (>6 km) capability against specified nontank targets. In addition, a high single shot probability of hit (Phit >0.7) against the long range target will be achieved, exceeding the current unguided 2.75 inch rocket baseline by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, and providing a 4 to 1 increase in stowed kills at 1/3 the cost per kill compared to current guided missiles. This will be accomplished through a set of 6.2 funded programs and 6.3 funded demonstrations to overcome barriers such as providing a low cost, produceable strapdown mechanism for precision guidance; considerations for guidance package retrofit to current 2.75 inch Hydra–70 rockets; and standoff range target acquisition and engagement techniques to address current free–rocket launch and flight dispersions.

Supports: Army Aviation, Apache AH–64.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Charles L. Lewis
MICOM
(205) 876–7663
DSN: 746–7663
Irena Szkrybalo
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
COL Jesse Danielson
ATZD–CD
(334) 255–3203
DSN: 558–3203

 

III.D.25—Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) for Weapons.  Conventional weapon systems are looking to extend their range through various technology approaches to facilitate a more favorable loss—exchange ratio on the battlefield. The ATR for weapons effort will provide for effective weapon engagement against a widely dispersed threat within the context of the digital battlefield and demonstrate extended range capabilities for LOAL which will play a crucial role in future soldier/weapon platform survivability. ATR has the potential to provide the soldier with a weapon that has true LOAL fire and forget capability at extended ranges with the added benefits of reacquisition of targets after loss of lock, friendly avoidance, and optimum aim point selection for increased warhead effectiveness. Effort includes Tri–service and industry assessments to determine the optimum approach for the Army. By FY98, define concept approach and collect data on various sensors under consideration. By FY99, exchange and assess Army, Air Force and Navy approaches, develop additional hardware and algorithms as required. By FY00, tower test and captive carry demonstrations of hardware/algorithms in realistic battlefield environments to include smoke and countermeasures. By FY01, use collected data in flight simulations and performance assessments for applicability to relevant weapon systems.

Supports: Hellfire III, BAT P3I, MSTAR, EFOG–M, UAV, and extended range fire and forget which demands LOAL, UGV, Avenger, FOTT P3I, Javelin, Stinger, FMTI.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Richard Sims
MICOM RDEC
(205) 876–1648
DSN: 746–1648
Irena Szkrybalo
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Warren Morimoto
DCD

DSN: 835–4268

 

III.D.26—Airborne Manned/Unmanned System Technology (AMUST).  Program Description: AMUST will evaluate the cooperative teaming of a manned helicopter with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and the resulting gains in operational payoffs available to the Maneuver Commander in support of Vision XXI and the Army After Next Concepts. The effort completes the Air Maneuver Battlelab’s Concept Experimentation Program for Manned and Unmanned Aerial Platform Operations on the Digitized Battlefield and will investigate a range of cost effective options for both ground and airborne control of the UAV, as well as sensor information availability as a function of mission scenarios and areas of operation (deep, close, urban), timelines, flight path G&C, airspace management, information fusion (onboard/offboard sensor data), spectrum management, and automation needs. AMUST will determine technical barriers associated with control of the UAV and sensors in the high workload environment of a manned helicopter and define the critical technologies for optimum manned/unmanned systems integration. AMUST will provide a 50% increase in survivability of the manned system, a 50% increase in aircraft lethality, and a real–time hunter–to–shooter capability. By FY98, determine AMUST scenario requirements, identify AMUST critical technologies and perform constructive simulations in an interactive environment. By FY99, continue technology investigations/optimizations and virtual simulations in an interactive environment. AMUST technology will have applications to the teaming of ground manned systems and Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) as well as ground manned systems with UAVs.

Supports: AH–64, RAH–66 upgrades; UAV Joint Program Office (JPO) developments; Air Maneuver Battle Lab Concept Experimentation Program (CEP); Depth and Simultaneous Attack (DSA), Mounted Maneuver Battlespace, Early Entry Lethality and Survivability, and Maneuver Support Battle Labs and other Services.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Kristopher Kuck
ATCOM/AATD
(757) 878–5734
DSN: 927–5734
John Yuhas
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8434
DSN: 224–8434
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.27p—Low–Cost Aviator’s Imaging Multispectral Modular Sensors.  By FY02, develop and demonstrate multispectral pilotage sensors that leverage state–of–the–art technologies for sensors and displays, including FLIR, Image Intensifier, Obstacle Detection sensors, and wide field–of–view (40 x 90) optics. The program will develop a core suite of modules with high resolution performance and low–light level capabilities required for pilotage sensors to achieve HTI across the aviation fleet to include Attack, Reconnaissance, utility, and cargo aircraft. The approach will improve aviators Safety–of–Flight, situational awareness, and pilotage capabilities under night battlefield, adverse weather, and MOUT conditions.

Supports: Attack, Reconnaissance, Utility/Cargo aircraft, Air Warrior, Mounted Battlespace.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Brian Gillespie
CERDEC/NVESD
(703) 704–1214
DSN: 654–1214
Rob Saunders
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.28—Integrated Sensors and Targeting.  Integrated Sensors and Targeting will demonstrate enhanced hostile situation awareness, target acquisition, precision threat geolocation, and combat ID assist using information derived from Army aircraft and ground vehicle radio frequency (RF), missile, and laser warning sensors. To accomplish this objective, the AN/ALQ–211, AN/ALQ–212, and AVR–2A threat warning sensors will be upgraded to provide a 10X improvement in target acquisition and geolocation to an accuracy of 100 meters at 10 kilometers. Fusion of preflight and real time C3I links with onboard emitter fingerprinting will provide enhanced combat ID assist for weapons release at maximum ranges. Real time bidirectional C3I feeds to the digitized battlefield will provide ground commanders and vehicles with targeting feeds from Longbow Apache equipped with the AN/ALQ–211. Off axis laser detection will provide ability to locate and destroy laser designators. By FY99, demonstrate integration of digital and hardware–in–the–loop (HITL) models into the CECOM Survivability Integration Lab (SIL)/Digital Integration Laboratory (DIL). FY00, conduct real time DIS experiments with Fort Rucker’s Cockpit simulator, Ft. Knox’s Mounted Test Bed, and Ft. Sill’s Targeting Test Bed that focus in on real time adjustments for operations OTM. FY01 conduct real time interactive Air/Ground cockpit digital modeling and simulation, hardware in the loop SIL testing. FY02 flight and ground vehicle testing, final report, transition to PM–AEC’s Future Technology Program plus Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite Demo. Note: This program has been staffed, with the support of the PM–AEC, by OSD as part of a cooperative EW Project Arrangement with the government of Australia.

Supports: PM–AECs Future Technologies Upgrade program for the AN/ALQ–211, AN/ALQ–212 and AVR–2A, PEO–IEW family of Shortstop, Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite Demo. Air Maneuver Battle Lab, Dismounted Battlespace, Mounted Battlespace, Depth & Simultaneous Attack, Battle Command, Full Spectrum Protection ATD, PM–GSI GVC and ADS programs.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Ray Irwin
CERDEC/NVESD
(908) 427–4589
DSN: 987–4589
Rob Saunders
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

 

III.D.29—Integrated Countermeasures.  Integrated CM will demonstrate new multispectral radio frequency (RF), infrared (IR) and electro–optics (EO) CM techniques and device upgrades that will provide Army aviation and ground vehicles with full dimensional protection to enable dominate maneuver on the battlefield. The AN/ALQ–211 and AN/ALQ–212 PM–AEC systems will be upgraded with advanced jamming modulators and algorithms to provide a family of configurable air and ground vehicle CM modules. This program will provide CM that provide greater than a 99% probability of survival per mission to multisensor IR/EO/RF and laser homing missiles, ATGMs and top attack smart munitions. This program will demonstrate a 50% reduction in installed sensor and A–kit weight and a 200% increase in MTBF, a fiber optic remoted low cross section RF antennas/transmitters. By FY99, demonstrate integration of digital and hardware–in–the–loop (HITL) jamming effectivity models of advanced imaging IR SAMs and double digit RF SAM system, under development by MSIC, into the CECOM Survivability Integration Lab (SIL)/Digital Integration Laboratory (DIL). FY00, DSI integration of AATD’s signature models into both CECOM’s, Fort Rucker’s Cockpit simulator, and Ft. Knox’s Mounted Test Bed. FY01 conduct real time interactive Air/Ground cockpit digital modeling and simulation, hardware in the loop SIL testing. FY02 flight and ground vehicle testing, final report, transition to PM–AEC’s AN/ALQ–211 and AN/ALQ–212 EMD update program plus Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite Demo.

Supports: PM–AEC’s Future Technologies Upgrade program for the AN/ALQ–211, AN/ALQ–212, and AVR–2A, PEO–IEW family of Shortstop, Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite Demo. Air Maneuver Battle Lab, Dismounted Battlespace, Mounted Battlespace, Depth & Simultaneous Attack, Battle Command, Full Spectrum Protection TD, PM–GSI GVC and ADS programs.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Ray Irwin
CERDEC/NVESD
(908) 427–4589
DSN: 987–4589
Rob Saunders
SARD–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Ted Hundley
U.S. Army Aviation Center and School
(334) 255–2571
DSN: 558–2571

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