News 1998 Army Science and Technology Master Plan



INDIVIDUAL SURVIVABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY (Section F)

IV.F.01—Small Arms Protection for the Individual Combatant.  Develop armor material system to minimize penalties associated with small arms protective body armor (e.g., excess weight, thickness, and cost; rigidity of materials; manufacturing methodology). By the end of FY96, determine viability of "flexible" ballistic protective vest for small arms protection. By the end of FY98, demonstrate advanced material system for protection against combined fragmentation and small arms threats (known ball threats up to and including 0.30 caliber), to be measured by a 20–30 percent reduction in areal density (weight for given area) over current small arms protection without significantly increasing other penalties.

Supports: Force XXI Land Warrior, Military Operations in Urban Terrain ACTD, Department of Justice, Advanced Development–RJS1/63747/D669–Clothing and Equipment, Engineering Development–RJS1/64713/DL40–Clothing and Equipment. DBS Battle Lab, Infantry and Transportation Corps Schools.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Wesley Goodwin
NRDEC
(508) 233–4538
DSN: 256–4538
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Chris Kearns
DBL
(706) 545–6391
DSN: 835–6391

 

IV.F.02—Thermal Signature Reduction for the Individual Combatant. By the end of FY97, demonstrate textile materials that reduce the contrast between the soldier’s thermal signature and the background by 30 percent, without significant degradation of the current level of visible or near–infrared camouflage protection. By the end of FY99, demonstrate combat uniform systems that reduce the soldier’s thermal signature by 50% from background levels, providing multispectral camouflage protection to the Dismounted Land Warrior. The technical challenge entails integrating signature reducing materials/ technologies into a textile substrate while maintaining basic fabric characteristics (durability, flexibility, breathability, etc.) and other soldier’s operational capabilities.

Supports: Force XXI Land Warrior, Military Operations in Urban Terrain ACTD, Advanced Development–RJS1/63747/D669–Clothing and Equipment, Engineering Development–RJS1/64713/DL40–Clothing and Equipment; DBS Battle Lab and Infantry School.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Thomas Pease
NRDEC
(508) 233–5546
DSN: 256–5546
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Chris Kearns
DBL
(706) 545–6391
DSN: 835–6391

 

IV.F.03—Agent Impermeable Membranes for Lightweight Chemical Protection.  By the end of FY96, demonstrate the technical feasibility of eliminating/reducing carbon in the chemical protective ensemble through the use of advanced semipermeable membrane technology. The resulting advanced material system will be 20 percent lighter in weight than the standard FY96 battledress overgarment material system, allow selective permeation of moisture while preventing passage of common vesicant agent, provide protection against penetration by toxic agents in aerosolized form, and provide at least the current level of protection against other toxic vapors and liquids. By the end of FY98, demonstrate via Dismounted Battlespace Battle Lab warfighting experiment and JSLIST P3I, the efficacy and durability of novel, lightweight chemical protective garments and clothing systems utilizing these agent impermeable membranes.

Supports: Force XXI Land Warrior, Advanced Development–RJS1/63747/D669–Clothing and Equipment, Engineering Development–RJS1/64713/DL40–Clothing and Equipment; DBS Battle Lab.

STO ManagerTSO

TRADOC POC

Eugene Wilusz
NRDEC
(508) 233–5486
DSN: 256–5486
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
CPT Ensor
CSS–BL
(706) 545–5994
DSN: 835–5994

 

IV.F.05—Improved Water Purification.  By the end of FY96, investigate emerging technologies such as aerogels, reverse osmosis membranes made from polyimides (as opposed to polyamide) and polyphosphazenes, and polyphosphazene coatings. Compare to other technologies such as mosaic membranes and polymeric microgels, and select those for further investigation. By the end of FY97, optimize the properties of the selected technologies to meet or exceed the performance of existing reverse osmosis membranes. Ultimately, the goal is to prove the feasibility of a new technology with a 300% increase in operating and storage life, a 50% increase in water flux, and tolerance to 5 ppm of chlorine, temperatures up to 165 degrees F, and pH from 5.0 to 9.5 when compared to conventional reverse osmosis membranes. The new technology will be applicable to military water treatment equipment ranging from individual purifiers to division and corps level units, and to municipal desalting plants. By the end of FY98, demonstrate an innovative water purification technology for providing drinking water to troops in the field.

Supports: Future and advanced water purification systems, and possibly wastewater treatment systems, commercial water treatment systems (dual–use, technology transfer), and Combat Service Support Battle Lab.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Thomas Bagwell
TARDEC
(703) 704–3346
DSN: 654–3346
John Appel
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Herbert Russakoff
CSS Battle Lab
(804) 734–0599
DSN: 687–0599

 

IV.F.06—Multifunctional Fabric System.  The objective of this effort is to enhance the flame and thermal protection levels of combat uniforms without compromising other protective characteristics. The technical challenge entails the integration of low–cost flame/thermal protection into other multiple threat systems to include capabilities such as electrostatic, environmental, chemical, and signature reduction. Potential technologies for use in the system are polyphenolic material coatings, microencapsulation of flame suppressants and electrospun fibers. By the end of FY99, demonstrate combined protection with a new or improved material such as a modified aramid, flame retardant fiber blends and novel experimental fibers. By the end of FY01, demonstrate combined protection using novel fibers and fabric treatments resulting in a fabric system, with a 50% decrease in the cost of existing flame protective systems, that will provide an increase in overall soldier survivability.

Supports: Upgrades to Land Warrior, Air Warrior, Mounted Warrior and MOUT; Transportation Corps, Quartermaster and Engineering Schools.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Thomas Pease
NRDEC
(508) 233–5546
DSN: 256–5546
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Chris Kearns
DBL
(706) 545–6391
DSN: 835–6391

 

IV.F.07—Biomimetic Materials for Soldier Protection.  By the end of FY98, demonstrate a ten–fold increase in expression level of spider–silk–like polymer (100 mg/liter as compared to current 10 mg/liter levels). At that time a production partner from industry will have been engaged and a database of the ballistic protective performance of silk yarns and fibers will have been established. By the end of FY99, incorporate second generation spider–silk–based fibers with improved ballistic protective properties and producibility into fabrics providing a 20% reduction in weight in comparison with present materials of equal ballistic strength. The significant technical barriers include expression of the proteins at high levels and defining the proper genetic modifications to simultaneously improve mechanical properties and processability.

Supports: Joint service program with the Air Force, Wright Patterson AFB; Ballistic Protective Armor and Equipment; DBS Battle Lab and Transportation Corps School.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Jean Herbert
NRDEC
(508) 233–4405
DSN: 256–4405
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Chris Kearns
DBL
(706) 545–6391
DSN: 835–6391

 

IV.F.10—Advanced Personnel Airdrop Technologies.  Demonstrate technologies to provide improved performance characteristics and enhanced safety of existing personnel parachute capabilities. Utilizing advanced airfoil and parachute designs, by the end of FY98, demonstrate a gliding personnel parachute with a 20% increase in maximum jump altitude and a 25% increase in glide ratio, when compared to the current Army state–of–the–art MC–4 parachute. By the end of FY00, demonstrate a soft landing capability that augments personnel parachute performance and will reduce system descent rates to values below 16 ft/sec, utilizing "pneumatic muscle" technologies.

Supports: Advanced Development–RAO2/63804/D266–Airdrop; Engineering Development RAO2/64804/D279–Airdrop; DBS Battle Lab.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Edward Doucette
NRDEC
(508) 233–4636
DSN: 256–4636
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Chris Kearns
DBL
(706) 545–6391
DSN: 835–6391

 

IV.F.11—Ballistic Protection for Improved Individual Survivability.  Develop and insert advances in materials technology that will increase the protection and performance of armor systems for the individual warfighter. Specifically, by the end of FY99, integrate and transition improved technologies (at least 20% reduced weight for small arms protection) to development and/or as technology insertions to modify existing individual protective systems. By the end of FY00, demonstrate/insert protective materials technology that will provide a reduction in casualties at 35% less system weight than the 1996 individual countermine protective systems. By the end of FY01, develop enhanced assessment criteria, to include behind armor effects, for ballistic impact on personnel armor systems. By the end of FY03, demonstrate an improved material system prototype (over FY99 insertions) for second generation multiple ballistic threat protection with a 25% decrease in weight (or an increase in protection or a combination, depending on user input). Technologies with potential to satisfy this STO include advances in polymeric materials through modification of existing fibers (copolymerization of aramid, PBO), bioengineered protein–based fibers, and the synthesis of new polymers. Improved rigid materials are anticipated through DARPA, and Army programs. These could include low cost, high performance boron carbide, new metal alloys, metal matrix composites and potentially other new ceramics/composites.

Supports: Transportation Corps, Military Police and Engineer Schools; DBS Battle Lab, Department of Justice, Advanced Development RJS1/63747/D669–Clothing and Equipment, Engineering Development RJS1/64713/DL40–Clothing and Equipment.

STO Manager

TSO

TRADOC POC

Wesley Goodwin
NRDEC
(508) 233-4538
DSN: 256-4538
Bill Brower
SARDA–TT
(703) 697–8432
DSN: 227–8432
Chris Kearns
DBL
(706) 545–6391
DSN: 835–6391

Click here to go to next page of document