News 1998 Army Science and Technology Master Plan



F. Intelligence and Electronic Warfare

Knowledge itself is power.

Francis Bacon

1. Introduction

Commanders require dynamic intelligence support tailored to their specific mission requirements. Intelligence must be timely to enable them to make informed decisions for the simultaneous application of decisive combat power across the depth and breadth of their areas of responsibility. The key to their ability to apply focused and synchronized combat power is a seamless intelligence system enabling them to utilize all of the capabilities of the intelligence community, including national agencies, theater assets, and organic capabilities to see the battlefield and target high–payoff enemy targets accurately.

Intelligence (Intel) XXI is the Army intelligence vision supporting Force XXI, created to provide intelligence support to warfighters at all echelons, joint and ground component commanders, and coalition forces across the continuum of 21st century military operations. This vision provides commanders with a knowledge–based, prediction–oriented, and operationally flexible intelligence system. Intel XXI is focused on intelligence support for the force projection Army in the information age of the 21st century.

The focus of Intel XXI is on the presentation of intelligence in a way that immediately conveys an understanding of the battlespace and the significance of the intelligence presented. Underlying the focus on presentation is an operationally flexible system executing an expanded intelligence cycle (present, manage, collect, process, and disseminate) in a more rapid and focused way to provide the commander what is needed, when it is needed, melded with his operational plan. The essence of intelligence is the ability to reduce uncertainty and provide an understanding of the battlefield through effective presentation. Intel XXI will enable us to leverage information age technology to do exactly that.

Based upon doctrinal underpinnings, the Army conducted a force design update for both the active and reserve component military intelligence force structure. The objective was to create a seamless system of intelligence systems from national to maneuver–battalion level. To meet the targeting challenges of the 21st century, key information and a common view of the battlespace will be sent to all commanders immediately, emphasizing graphic rather than narrative reporting. This integrated battlefield will be visually portrayed throughout its width, depth, and height, with sensor input sufficiently accurate to permit precision targeting.

Counterintelligence (CI) and human intelligence (HUMINT) are integral to intelligence and electronic warfare (IEW) and contribute to the warfighters’ ability to conduct operations by denying information to enemy weapon and information–gathering systems, deceiving the enemy regarding the battlefield situation, and developing unprecedented environmental awareness and force protection predictability.

Meeting the warfighters’ demands for timely, accurate, and relevant targeting information requires a future intelligence architecture built upon these key modernization concepts. Our goal is:

One family of UAVs to fix targets.
One airborne system to look deep.
One division sensor system that does it all.
One all–source analysis system that fuses it all.
One processor to exploit national capabilities.
One common ground station to conduct the fight.

The research, development, and fielding of this new generation of intelligence systems is a continuous process. The intelligence force capabilities provided by our modernization program give us a more balanced and capable force. Planned S/SU/ACs will provide the operational capabilities that will ensure our spectrum supremacy and allow us to win the information war.

2. Relationship to Operational Capabilities

In Table III–9, detailed IEW system capabilities are summarized; the S/SU capability column refers to relatively near–term capabilities, the AC capability column presents far–term goals. Correlation between these system capabilities, the IEW S/SU/ACs, and the Army modernization objectives is also displayed.

3. IEW Modernization Strategy

The modernization of Army intelligence and electronic warfare systems is discussed in Annex NO TAG, IEW, to the AMP. It develops a strategy for an open systems architecture to allow for continuous modernization of the IEW mission area to provide multimission systems on common carriers for a complementary mix of airborne, ground–based, and cross–forward line of own troops (FLOT) sensors, processors, and jammers. The goal of IEW modernization is to provide the Army with the most capable IEW systems in the world, while developing future systems to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

As noted in the introduction to this section, Intel XXI is the intelligence vision that supports Force XXI. Its intent is fundamentally based on the requirement to provide intelligence support to warfighters and joint and ground component commanders across the continuum of the 21st century military operations, with emphasis on how intelligence will support our force projection Army in the information age. The basic requirements that the vision supports are battle command, extended battlespace dominance (understanding the information battlefield, C2 exploit, C2 attack, and C2 protect), force projection, and operational flexibility.

Key to battle command and battlespace dominance is information presentation to the commander in the form of visual displays. Intel XXI’s three primary objectives are to provide to the commander a virtual, near–real time, continuous picture of the battlespace, intelligence support for targeting, and battle damage assessment. These objectives drive requirements for sensors, processors, and communications capabilities.

To accommodate the requirements of the future, IEW must use the Army’s RDA concept and enabling strategies to guide its efforts. Today’s technology is not sufficiently capable of fully satisfying Force XXI intelligence requirements. Efforts are under way to consolidate and accelerate several disparate programs in order to field key capabilities in the following technology areas: displays, computer hardware, software, visualization databases, sensors, automatic target recognition, and networks.

The capabilities described in this plan are augmented by the National Foreign Intelligence Program: general defense intelligence, consolidated cryptologic, and foreign counterintelligence programs.

4. Roadmaps for IEW Systems

Table III–10 presents a summary of IEW TDs, ACTDs, ATDs, and S/SU/ACs as found in the IEW roadmaps. Systems and system upgrades are the first step in fulfilling the IEW strategy. These will evolve from current systems through the use of product improvement programs (PIPs) and P3Is. Technology demonstrations and ATDs will be utilized to facilitate the transition of technology through block improvements to existing or new systems. The challenge is to field a family of IEW systems that use a common module open architecture, thus improving flexibility, reducing the logistics burden, and minimizing development costs.

For the far–term, future systems planning is focused on the integration of IEW systems with command, control, and communication systems into one C3 IEW "system–of–systems," which will

Table III–9.  IEW System Capabilities

System/
System Upgrade/
Advanced Concept
Function

Patterns of Operation

System/
System Upgrade
Capability

Advanced Concept
Capability

  Project the Force Protect the Force Gain Information Dominance Decisive Operations Shape the Battlespace Sustain the Force    
CLOSE RSTA             (ELINT, COMINT, and electronic attack (EA) radar multisensor package

Sensor to detect, track, and classify vehicles and personnel

UAV penetration and stand–in reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition (RSTA)/EW modular payload

Manned aircraft with multipurpose RSTA sensor suite

Airborne SIGINT/IMINT/radar/ELINT/MASINT collection system for mid–range emitter mapping

UAV modular sensor (imagery, meteorological, NBC) with cross–cueing/processing

UAV stationary target ID sensor classification

Integrated system of sensors and collectors

Survivable

All weather
All echelons

Mobile

Flexible and adaptable

Multiplatform

Ground based
Airborne

Multispectral and integration

Imagery assessment
Acoustic
Radar
Laser
COMINT
ELINT
HF–EHF

Accurate

Range
Location
Percent detected

Modular

Common platforms
Common hardware and software

Onboard preprocessing

System            
Ground–Based Common Sensor—Heavy*  

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Ground–Based Common Sensor—Light  

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Tactical UAV Intel Package  

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System Upgrade            
Advanced QUICKFIX  

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Advanced Concept            
Integrated Intercept  

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Integrated Sensor  

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DEEP RSTA (GROUND/
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System Upgrade            
Enhanced Trackwolf  

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Advanced Concept            
Integrated Intercept  

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Integrated Sensor  

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PROCESSING & FUSION             Situation development target engagement

Intel OTM antenna upgrades

Automated weather decision aids

Mapping propagation

Single, multiple, and all–source processing

Intelligent information

Correlation and fusion
Expert systems
Decision aids
Artificial intelligence
Target identification
Target nominations
Situation analysis

Information dissemination

Multiechelon
Closed–loop target handoff

Common modules

Hardware and software
Built–in training

System Upgrade            
ASAS Upgrades    

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Integrated Meteorological System

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Meteorological Measuring Set

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Advanced Concept            
Distributed IEW Fusion    

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Profiler

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ELECTRONIC ATTACK/
PROTECTION
            Stand–in UAV

HF–UHF and beyond (threat dependent)

Standoff

Long range electronic attack

Active passive cooperative target ID

Vehicular self–protection

Aircraft self–protection/suppression of enemy air defense (SEAD)

Laser warning

IRCM

HPM/MMW

Aircraft protection

Jammer family

Communications, noncommunications

Multisignal

Multispectral autonomous

Standoff

Penetration

Implanted

Expendable

Active/passive noncooperative IFF

Protection against

Ground based

Airborne

Space bases

Radar, IR EO

Onboard C2 integration

Laser beamrider warning/CM

System            
Tactical UAV Intel Package  

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Ground–Based Common Sensor—Heavy  

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System Upgrade            
Advanced QUICKFIX*  

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Advanced Concept            
Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite  

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Table III–10.  IEW Demonstration and System Summary

Advanced Technology Demonstration

Technology Demonstration

Multispectral Countermeasures (see Aviation)

Tactical C2 Project

Multimission/Common Modular UAV Sensors

IEW Ground–Based Collection Demonstrations

Impulse/Wideband Electronic Support (ES)
Advanced ES Receiver
Modern Communications A/D Beamformer ES/EA

IEW Airborne Collection Demonstrations

Orion
SAR Target Recognition and Location System

Intelligence Processing and Fusion Demonstrations

Multiple Source Correlated Intelligence Fusion Demonstration
Owning the Weather
Tactical Intelligence Data Fusion Techniques

Information Denial Demonstrations

Advanced Digital Electronic Attack
SAR Deception Techniques
C3 Warfare Techniques
Modern C2 Warfare
Integrated Sensors and Targeting
Integrated Countermeasures

Advanced Concept
Technology Demonstration

 
Joint Precision Strike Demonstration—Precision/Rapid Counter MRL ACTD

(For additional information, see Volume II, Annex B.)

 

System/System Upgrade/Advanced Concept

System

Ground–Based Common Sensor—Heavy
Ground–Based Common Sensor—Light (Land Warrior SIGINT Division)
Tactical UAV Intelligence Package

System Upgrade

Advanced QUICKFIX (Aerial Common Sensor—Division)
ASAS Upgrades
Enhanced Trackwolf
Integrated Meteorological System
Integrated Countermeasures
Meteorological Measuring Set

Advanced Concept

Integrated Intercept System
Integrated Sensor Sensor
Distributed IEW Fusion
Profiler
Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite

carry out the presentation, management, collection, processing, dissemination, transport, and denial of battlespace information.

The following sections contain roadmaps that lay out the required program efforts in information collection (Figures III–4 and III–5), information processing (Figure III–6), and information denial (Figure III–7). Each section contains descriptions of associated technology demonstrations that support IEW S/SU/ACs.

Most of the demonstrations directly support the systems that form the basis of the IEW annex to the AMP. The remaining demonstrations represent initiatives that support a variety of IEW systems, or are technology programs supporting non–MI systems not specifically addressed in the IEW annex to the AMP.

a. Technology Programs Leading to Information Collection for IEW Ground–Based Collection Systems

Ground–based collectors for IEW ground–based collection systems are targeted against multiple echelons. They embody modular, scalable, multisensor capabilities that combine ELINT, COMINT, and EA. The mixture of systems ranges from transportable to manpack. Each provides surveillance, targeting, and intelligence data to be correlated with data provided by other sensors. The roadmap for ground–based collection systems is shown in Figure III–4.

Figure III-4. Roadmap - IEW Ground-Based Information Collection Modernization
Figure III-4. Roadmap - IEW Ground-Based Information Collection Modernization
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Impulse Wideband Electronic Support (ES) TD (1997–04). This demonstration will focus on developing advanced techniques to detect, characterize, and geolocate impulse radars in the presence of conventional radars and communication signals. Impulse radars represent a significant advance in the state of the art for battlefield radars. Since they were developed to counter detection, location, and destruction, current countermeasures are ineffective against them. This work will involve a coordinated effort that includes tri–service and international participation, as well as the use of the SBIR program. The objective of these programs is to develop technology for insertion into current and future ES systems to counter the emerging impulse radar threat. Supports: Ground–Based Common Sensor.

Advanced Electronic Support (ES) Receiver TD (2000–03). This program will demonstrate a digital reconfigurable receiver to accommodate a variety of missions. This digital channelized receiver is intended to upgrade the intelligence and electronic warfare countermeasures suite (IEWCS) front end to intercept very wideband signals in a single–channel mode, as well as to resolve narrowband signals spatially in a multichannel mode. This ensures exploitation of modern communication signals and efficient allocation of system resources. Supports: IEWCS and GBCS.

Modern Communications Analog/Digital (A/D) Beamformer Electronic Support/Electronic Attack (ES/EA) TD (2000–04). The ability to resolve targets spatially using beamforming developments will increase the standoff ranges in which communications collection can occur, or provide greater system sensitivity for signals at lower signal–to–noise ratios at current standoff ranges. This program will demonstrate the effective use of this technology to address the frequency reuse or cochannel interference problem in modern communications collection and identification to support electronic attack issues. Supports: IEWCS and GBCS.

b. Technology Programs Leading to Information Collection Modernization for IEW Airborne Collection Systems

The roadmap for airborne information collection shows a mixture of manned and unmanned platforms. The manned aircraft will undergo preplanned product improvements that will add required capabilities on an incremental basis. Unmanned airborne vehicles will carry a variety of IEW sensor packages. The roadmap is shown in Figure III–5.

Figure III-5. Roadmap - IEW Airborne Information Collection Modernization
Figure III-5. Roadmap - IEW Airborne Information Collection Modernization
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JPSD Precision/Rapid Counter Multiple Rocket Launcher (MRL) ACTD (1995–98). This mature ACTD has demonstrated a significant enhanced capability for U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) to neutralize the North Korean 240–mm MRL system. Because the 240–mm MRL is a mobile and fleeting target, it is expected to be exposed and vulnerable to counterfire for very short time periods. It is an extremely sensitive, time–critical target (TCT), requiring nearly continuous surveillance and nearly instantaneous target acquisition. The realities of terrain on the Korean peninsula require that a sensor be overhead and that target information be made available to the firing unit most capable of hitting the 240–mm MRL in the least possible time. A second–generation IR line scanner called the Reconnaissance Infrared Surveillance and Target Acquisition (RISTA II for second generation) was developed with an Aided Target Recognizer and Processor (AiTRAP). This system provides high–resolution, wide–area coverage, and automatic target chip presentation to a targeteer. The system was proven in FY96 at a demonstration at Fort AP Hill. The system was to be integrated on a Hunter UAV, but reconfiguration of the DoD UAV program precluded Hunter availability. Plans are to demonstrate it at Fort Hunter Ligget on an ALTUS Predator UAV. The sensor leave–behind for the counter multiple rocket launcher (CMRL) problem is an Aided Target Recognizer for application to TESAR. The AiTRAP will cue the targeteer to 240 MRL targets. A preliminary demonstration of this capability was shown in FY96 at Fort AP Hill. A demonstration of real–time SAR ATR against 240 MRL targets will occur in 4QFY97. The first leave–behind will be a Challenger–based system for CONUS Predator systems in FY97, and the second leave–behind will be a COTS processor in the Predator ground control station (GCS) for OCONUS deployment. Supports: Joint Precision Strike and Joint Attack Operations.

Multimission/Common Modular UAV Sensors ATD (1997–01). This ATD will provide a low–cost, lightweight, EO/IR integrated MTI radar/SAR payload for integration on future tactical UAVs. The radar payload will build upon successes in the current low–cost radar development program and will likely utilize monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC). The FLIR will take advantage of high quantum efficiency, 3–5–micron staring arrays. These sensor payloads will provide enhanced reconnaissance, surveillance, battle damage assessment, and targeting for non–line–of–sight weapons. Demonstrations will focus on multiple mission flexibility in support of early entry and deep attack forces. Supports: Tactical UAV Intel Package.

Impulse Wideband Electronic Support TD (1997–04). See description in the Ground–Based Collection Systems subsection above.

Orion TD (1995–98). This program will demonstrate the operational effectiveness of a wide bandwidth SIGINT ES package on a surrogate UAV platform operating in conjunction with a ground–based IEW common sensor that receives the UAV ES–detected signals and performs the intercept/processing task to locate high value C2 targets, thus enhancing the capabilities of the IEW common sensor by allowing deeper penetration of the enemy’s communications space to detect even low signal levels from directional systems such as multichannel. The system will also allow the intercept of modern low–power communications. Collection of these signals is difficult due to low radiated power. Orion provides needed access to these signals. There are also plans to include EA into the package to provide a unique capability to attack deep targets and assist in the execution of information warfare missions against critical deep targets. Supports: Tactical UAV Intel Package.

Advanced ES Receiver Demonstration and Modern Communications Beamformer ES/EA Demonstration TD (2000–04). See description in the Ground–Based Collection System subsection above.

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Target Recognition and Location System (STARLOS) TD (1994–99). This program will develop real–time aided/ATR capabilities and demonstrate their functionality in a number of different platforms using SAR as sensor. The ATR capabilities will be demonstrated in the ground station for the aerial platforms and will concentrate on the detection, classification, recognition, and identification of high–value, high–payoff targets. The program will provide location of time–critical targets in day/night and most weather conditions using wide–area coverage rates. Since multiple platforms will be addressed, the ATR algorithms will be implemented using scalable common ATR hardware. In addition, the scalable hardware will be used to execute algorithms for other sensors including second–generation FLIR/line scanner (LS), thus allowing more platforms (both intelligence and combat weapon) to be considered for potential ATR insertion using the principles of HTI. Supports: Precision Strike, Medium–Altitude Endurance UAV, and Tactical UAV Intel Package.

c. Technology Programs Leading to Intelligence Processing and Fusion Modernization

The objective of intelligence fusion and processing modernization is the development and fielding of common hardware and software for intelligence analysis centers. The goal is to shorten timelines for supplying intelligence to the commander and to provide real–time target information to weapon systems. The roadmap is shown in Figure III–6.

Figure III-6. Roadmap - IEW Fusion Information Processing Modernization
Figure III-6. Roadmap - IEW Fusion Information Processing Modernization
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Tactical Intelligence Data Fusion Demonstration TD (1996–00). The objective of the program is to demonstrate automated tactical data fusion concepts and technology and to establish the effectiveness of these tools as an intelligence force multiplier for the commander. Enhanced military intelligence collection and asset management tools, terrain reasoning tools, enhanced information dissemination tools and techniques, and battle damage assessment (BDA) tools and techniques will be developed and integrated into existing IEW systems. IEW asset management and intelligence preparation of the battlefield (IPB) tools and techniques have been successfully demonstrated at Task Force XXI. Future plans include the demonstration of multiple source fusion using SIGINT and MTI radar data. Simulation tools will be used to evaluate the use of information from nonconventional sources such as the airborne survivability equipment (ASE) to enhance intelligence collection. Ultimately, advanced airborne planning algorithms and effectiveness tools will be integrated into IEWCS multisensor tasking and reporting tools using database–to–database interfaces. These tools will allow the commander to receive timely, correlated information allowing operations within the enemy’s decision cycle. Supports: ASAS and IEWCS.

Multiple Source Correlated Intelligence Fusion Demonstration TD (1999–03). This effort will demonstrate a fully integrated tactical intelligence data fusion module at corps and division levels. The module will be stimulated with diverse inputs and perform various fusing functions to provide the commander with a comprehensive visualization of the battlefield using advanced, multimedia display techniques to provide complete status of the situation in an easily viewed and understandable format (status at a glance). Inputs to the module will be from the entire suite of battlefield sensors and both tactical and strategic intelligence sources. Sensors will be queued, and remote resources queried, to synchronize the fusion effort with the supported tactical operation. Data will be correlated using advanced fusion techniques, such as automated terrain reasoning, for location and movement analysis and amalgamated into intelligence products. This module will support functions from the initial IPB to final BDAs and will also assist in fratricide prevention. Supports: ASAS and IEWCS.

Owning the Weather TD (1996–03). This program consists of three interrelated TDs that will transition directly from 6.2 into the integrated meteorological system (IMETS) and the field artillery’s meteorological measuring set (MMS), the advanced concept profiler, Army battle command system (ABCS), battlefield automated systems (BASs), and the modeling and simulation (M&S) community. The first TD, target area meteorology, will upgrade IMETS and MMS with a battlespace forecasting capability and add computer–assisted artillery meteorology software to the MMS and future profiler for improved accuracy of indirect fire and precision strike. The profiler will replace balloon–borne measuring systems and hydrogen generators on the battlefield. The second TD, automated decision aids, will enable commanders to apply this improved knowledge of battlefield weather to compare weather–based advantages/disadvantages of friendly and threat systems using automated decision aid client applications on ABCS BASs served by the IMETS through a distributed computing environment. Automated weather decision aids were used effectively in the Brigade Task Force XXI AWE 2QFY97 to demonstrate the utility of the client server architecture. The third TD extends the target area meteorology and decision aid technology to the M&S environment so that realistic operational battlescale forecast weather and predicted impacts on systems and operations are also useable in mission rehearsal, training, and combat simulations. Supports: IMETS, MMS, Profiler, ABCS, and Distributed Interactive Simulation.

d. Technology Programs Leading to Denial Systems Modernization

Denial systems are categorized into three main areas: jamming systems, deception systems, and self–protection systems. The objective of these systems is to deny the enemy vital information and to deceive and disrupt his command and control and weapon systems. The roadmap is shown in Figure III–7.

Figure III-7. Roadmap - IEW Information Denial Modernization
Figure III-7. Roadmap - IEW Information Denial Modernization
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Multispectral Countermeasures ATD (1997–99). The purpose of the Multispectral Countermeasures ATD is to develop prototype imaging IR missile jamming techniques, a fiber–optic–coupled multiline laser, and a miniature tracker as a system upgrade to the AN/ALQ–212 to protect Army helicopters from imaging surface–to–air missiles. See Section III–D "Aviation" (above) for more detailed information. Supports: Integrated Countermeasures, Airborne Platforms, Upgrades to AN/ALQ–211 and AN/ALQ–212, and CAGES.

Integrated Sensors and Targeting (ISAT) TD (1999–02). This program will develop a leap–ahead targeting upgrade to the suite of integrated RF countermeasures (AN/ALQ–211) and suite of integrated IR countermeasures (AN/ALQ–212). See the section on Aviation (above) for more detailed information. Supports: Upgrades to the AN/ALQ–211 and AN/ALQ–212, ICM, and CAGES.

Integrated Countermeasures (ICM) TD (1999–02). This program will develop and demonstrate a leap–ahead integrated RF, EO, IR countermeasures system upgrade for the AN/ALQ–211 and AN/ALQ–212 systems for both conventional and reduced signature aircraft with HTI–to–ground survivability. See the section on Aviation (above) for more detailed information. Supports: Upgrades to the AN/ALQ–211 and AN/ALQ–212, ICM, and CAGES.

Tactical C2 Protect ATD (1998–02). This ATD will demonstrate the ability to launch effective C2 attack against integrated battlefield area communications systems (IBACSs) (threat information systems). It will also demonstrate the ability to protect the Army’s tactical information systems, components, and data from modern network attacks. The demonstration will leverage existing technology, exploit modeling and simulation methods for concept exploration and definition, and use C2 attack capabilities against TI information systems and components. For each C2 attack method, a counter–capability (C2 protect) will be incorporated. The demonstration will provide the ability to control an adversary’s use of information, information–based processes, and information systems selectively through the application of offensive capabilities that deny, disrupt, or degrade operations or capabilities. Supports: ICM and TI C2 Components and Networks.

Advanced Digital Electronic Attack (EA) TD (1995–99). This demonstration will establish the effectiveness of exploitation and jamming techniques based on vulnerabilities of various format modern analog and digital communications systems. A prototype system for detecting and collecting analog and digital signals will be fabricated to allow for demonstration of proof–of–concept countermeasures techniques. Supports: IEWCS and GBCS.

Modern C2 Warfare (2000–03). This program will demonstrate the ability to intercept, locate, and disrupt emerging high priority threat systems utilizing advanced communications technologies. This program will also investigate the advanced digital signal processing, encryption, and complex modulation techniques being incorporated into many of the commercial systems proliferating throughout the world. Supports: IEWCS and GBCS.

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Deception Techniques TD (1997–02). This exploratory development project will yield components to counter, through deception techniques, the SAR threat. These components include hardware, software, and associated techniques, as well as ancillary equipment. The requirements to deceive and jam air defense and surveillance radar will continue to increase as new threat radars are developed that use bistatic and other advanced techniques to avoid destruction and to counter low observables. Supports: IEWCS.

C3 Warfare Techniques TD (1997–03). Provides the capability for the Army to win the information war on the battlefield or, more importantly, to affect enemy information systems prior to the actual engagement of ground forces. Modern advanced threat usable communications transmitters and receivers, both military–unique and commercial–adapted, will be technically analyzed for capabilities and vulnerabilities. Exploitation techniques will be developed and tested to counter new complex, antijam, and anti–intercept signals that continually emerge from sources throughout the world. This effort will allow the Army to counter, from an IEW perspective, the frequent technology breakthroughs that can effectively negate our ability to shape enemy actions by manipulating the flow of information and intelligence continuum of operations tasked to the force projection Army. Supports: IEWCS.

5. Relationship to Modernization Plan Annexes

Table III–11 shows the correlation between IEW S/SU/ACs and other AMP annexes. Note that IEW sensors provide a significant capability in the modernization process of other mission areas.

The long–term goal is for Army C3IEW functions to evolve into an integrated battlespace information system (BIS–21), which provides for the information collection, management, transport, and denial functions required in the 21st century. This BIS–21 concept is synchronized with the DoD "C4I for the Warrior" concept, which promotes the ability of a warfighter to "plug in" globally and obtain required battlespace information at any time.

Table III–11.  Correlation Between IEW S/SU/ACs and Other AMP Annexes

System/System Upgrade/Advanced Concept

Modernization Plan Annexes

  C4 Aviation Fire Support Space & Missile Defense Close Combat Light* Mounted Forces* Engineer & Mine Warfare Space
System Ground–Based Common Sensor Heavy/Light  

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System Upgrade Enhanced Trackwolf

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  Advanced QUICKFIX

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  ASAS Upgrades

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  Integrated Countermeasures  

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  Integrated Meteorological System

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  Meteorological Measuring Set

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Advanced Concept Integrated Intercept System

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  Integrated Sensor System

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  Distributed IEW Fusion

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  Common Air/Ground Electronic Combat Suite

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  Profiler

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* See Combat Maneuver Annex.
dot1.gif (49 bytes) System plays a significant role in the modernization strategy
dot2.gif (53 bytes) System makes a contribution to the modernization strategy

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