News 1998 Army Science and Technology Master Plan



Chapter VI
Infrastructure

A major element of the Army strategy for military technology is a strong, viable in–house research capability. Laboratories and research, development, and engineering centers (RDECs) are the key organizations responsible for technical leadership, scientific advancement, and support for the acquisition process. The organizational structure of the current Army science and technology (S&T) program is illustrated in Figure VI–1, the funding breakdown by organization is shown in Figure VI–2, and the geographical locations of research sites are shown in Figure VI–3.

Figure VI-1. Army Science and Technology Organization
Figure VI-1. Army Science and Technology Organization

Figure VI-2. Army Science and Technology Funding Distribution, FY98
Figure VI-2. Army Science and Technology Funding Distribution, FY98

Figure VI-3. Army Research and Development Resources involved in Science and Technology
Figure VI-3. Army Research and Development Resources involved in Science and Technology

The Army is committed to maintaining world–class research, development, and testing facilities. We equip these facilities with modern equipment and hire and retain personnel capable of utilizing the tools provided. This infrastructure is committed to meeting the developmental needs of the land combat force and providing for the effective transfer of developing technologies to the civil as well as military sectors.

The Army continues a multifaceted approach to support and maintain its infrastructure. Appropriated funds are used to construct, purchase, and maintain unique equipment and facilities. As appropriate, equipment items or facilities that are developed during a specific program are retained and modified to meet additional R&D needs. The Army continues to expand modeling and simulation (M&S) capacities to reduce costs of materiel development, improve safety, and shorten developmental schedules. Finally, the Army leverages the facility investments of external organizations by sharing or otherwise using those facilities that contribute to Army objectives.

The Army’s supporting R&D infrastructure consists of (1) the federated laboratory initiative, (2) physical facilities and equipment, (3) distributed simulation, (4) modeling/software/testbeds, (5) information technology/communications, and (6) personnel.

This chapter addresses these capabilities at Army installations and those available to the Army through working relationships with other organizations. Examples of successful operations and descriptions of how the Army has benefited are presented. Also highlighted are Army plans to enhance and improve existing capabilities through investment and leveraging.

Chapters III through V outline what the Army plans to accomplish in terms of science, technology, and development to meet the Army’s future warfighting needs. How well this is accomplished depends largely on the ability of management to apply state–of–the–art scientific tools, equipment and facilities, and personnel resources in meeting the stated goals.

Keeping the infrastructure up to date demands a monetary investment that is consistent with the needs of the materiel, combat, operational and training development communities. It also involves internal investment in S&T to provide added technology to meet Army modernization objectives. The Science and Technology Objectives (STOs) in Volume II enhance our ability to support materiel development and support advances in gaming and modeling battlefield operations and doctrine.

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