FM 101-5-1
Operational Terms and Graphics


Chapter 1

J


jamming - The deliberate radiation, reradiation, or reflection of electromagnetic energy to prevent or degrade the receipt of information by a receiver. It includes communications and noncommunications jamming. (See also barrage jamming, command and control warfare (C2W), electromagnetic interference (EMI), electronic attack (EA), electronic warfare (EW), imitative electronic deception (IED), intrusion, and meaconing.) See FMs 34-1, 34-40, and 100-6.

joint air attack team (JAAT) (Army) - A combination of US Army attack and scout aircraft and fixed-wing close air support (CAS) aircraft operating together to locate and attack high-priority lucrative targets such as tanks and other targets of opportunity. JAAT normally operates in a coordinated effort with fire support, air defense artillery, and ground maneuver forces against enemy armored formations, command vehicles, and enemy air defense weapon systems. See FMs 1-112 and 6-20 series.

joint civil affairs task force (JCATF) (Army) - A joint task force composed of civil affairs units from more than one service, formed to carry out a specific civil affairs operation or prosecute civil affairs in support of a theater campaign or other operations. The JCATF may have conventional noncivil affairs units assigned or attached to support the conduct of specific missions.

joint force (JP 1-02) - A general term applied to a force composed of significant elements, assigned or attached, of two or more Military Departments, operating under a single commander authorized to exercise operational control. See FMs 100-5, 100-15, 100-20, and JP 0-2.

joint force air component commander (JFACC) (JP 1-02) - The joint force air component commander derives authority from the joint force commander who has the authority to exercise operational control, assign missions, direct coordination among subordinate commanders, redirect and organize forces to ensure unity of effort in the accomplishment of the overall mission. The joint force commander will normally designate a joint force air component commander. The joint force air component commander's responsibilities will be assigned by the joint force commander (normally these would include, but not be limited to, planning, coordination, allocation, and tasking based on the joint force commander's apportionment decision). Using the joint force commander's guidance and authority, and in coordination with other Service component commanders and other assigned or supporting commanders, the joint force air component commander will recommend to the joint force commander apportionment of air sorties to various missions or geographic areas. (See also joint force commander (JFC).) See FMs 71-100 and 100-15.

joint force commander (JFC) (JP 1-02) - A general term applied to a combatant commander, subunified commander, or joint task force commander authorized to exercise combatant command (command authority) or operational control over a joint force. See FMs 71-100, 100-15, 100-20, and JP 0-2.

joint force land component commander (JFLCC) (JP 1-02) - The commander within a unified command, subordinate unified command, or joint task force responsible to the establishing commander for making recommendations on the proper employment of land forces, planning and coordinating land operations, or accomplishing such operational missions as may be assigned. The joint force land component commander is given the authority necessary to accomplish missions and tasks assigned by the establishing commander. The joint force land component commander will normally be the commander with the preponderance of land forces and the requisite command and control capabilities. (See also land component commander (LCC).) See FMs 100-5, 100-15, 100-20, and 100-30.

joint force maritime component commander (JFMCC) (JP 1-02) - The commander within a unified command, subordinate unified command, or joint task force responsible to the establishing commander for making recommendations on the proper employment of maritime forces and assets, planning and coordinating maritime operations, or accomplishing such operational missions as may be assigned. The joint force maritime component commander is given the authority necessary to accomplish missions and tasks assigned by the establishing commander. The joint force maritime component commander will normally be the commander with the preponderance of maritime forces and the requisite command and control capabilities.

joint force special operations component commander (JFSOCC) (JP 1-02) - The commander within a unified command, subordinate unified command, or joint task force responsible to the establishing commander for making recommendations on the proper employment of special operations forces and assets, planning and coordinating special operations, or accomplishing such operational missions as may be assigned. The joint force special operations component commander is given the authority necessary to accomplish missions and tasks assigned by the establishing commander. The joint force special operations component commander will normally be the commander with the preponderance of special operations forces and the requisite command and control capabilities.

Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES) (JP 1-02) - A continuously evolving system that is being developed through the integration and enhancement of earlier planning and execution systems: Joint Operation Planning System and Joint Deployment System. It provides the foundation for conventional command and control by national- and theater-level commanders and their staffs. It is designed to satisfy their information needs in the conduct of joint planning and operations. Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES) includes joint operation planning policies, procedures, and reporting structures supported by communications and automated data processing systems. JOPES is used to monitor, plan, and execute mobilization, deployment, employment, and sustainment activities associated with joint operations. (See also joint operations.) See FM 101-5.

joint operations (JP 1-02) - A general term to describe military actions conducted by joint forces, or by Service forces in relationships (e.g., support, coordinating authority), which, of themselves, do not create joint forces. (Army) - Operations carried on by two or more of the armed forces. See FMs 100-5, 100-15, 100-20, and JP 0-2.

joint psychological operations task force (JPOTF) (Army) - A joint task force composed of psychological operations units from more than one service, formed to carry out a specific psychological operation or to prosecute psychological operations in support of a theater campaign or other operations. This joint task force may have conventional nonpsychological operations units under operational control, assigned, or attached to support the conduct of specific missions. It is subordinate to the joint task force and has a coequal position with the joint special operations task force, Army, Marine, Navy, and Air Force forces commanders. See FMs 33-1, 100-15, and 100-20.

joint special operations air component commander (JSOACC) (JP 1-02) -The commander within the joint force special operations command responsible for planning and executing joint special air operations and for coordinating and deconflicting such operations with conventional nonspecial operations air activities. The joint special operations air component commander normally will be the commander with the preponderance of assets and/or greatest ability to plan, coordinate, allocate, task, control, and support the assigned joint special operations aviation assets. The joint special operations air component commander may be directly subordinate to the joint force special operations component commander or to any nonspecial operations component or joint force commander as directed.

joint special operations area (Army) - That area of land, sea, and airspace assigned to a joint special operations command to conduct special operations. See FM 31-20.

joint special operations task force (JSOTF) (JP 1-02) - A joint task force composed of special operations units from more than one Service, formed to carry out a specific special operation or prosecute special operations in support of a theater campaign or other operations. The JSOTF may have conventional nonspecial operations units assigned or attached to support the conduct of specific missions. See FMs 71-100, 100-15, 100-20, and 100-25.

joint suppression of enemy air defenses (JSEAD) (JP 1-02) - A broad term that includes all suppression of enemy air defenses activities provided by one component of the joint force in support of another. (See also air defense suppression and suppression of enemy air defenses (SEAD).) See FMs 44-100 and 6-20 series.

joint task force (JTF) (JP 1-02) - A joint force that is constituted and so designated by the Secretary of Defense, a combatant commander, a subunified commander, or an existing joint task force commander. See FMs 100-5, 100-15, 100-20, and JP 0-2.

joint unconventional warfare task force (JUWTF) (Army) - A force composed of unconventional warfare forces of two or more services which is constituted by the Secretary of Defense or by the commander of a unified command, a specified command, or an existing joint task force. (See also joint special operations task force (JSOTF) and joint psychological operations task force (JPOTF).) See FMs 100-5, 100-20, and 100-25.


K

key terrain (JP 1-02, NATO) - Any locality, or area, the seizure or retention of which affords a marked advantage to either combatant. (See also intelligence preparation of the battlefield (IPB).) See FM 34-130.

killed in action (KIA) (JP 1-02) - A casualty category applicable to a hostile casualty, other than the victim of a terrorist activity, who is killed outright or who dies as a result of wounds or other injuries before reaching a medical treatment facility. (See also casualty, died of wounds (DOW), hostile casualty, nonhostile casualty, and graves registration.) See FMs 8-10, 8-55, 10-63-1, 12-6, and 16-1.


L

land component commander (LCC) (Army) - The senior commander of a joint or multinational military force responsible for all aspects of operations for land maneuver and support forces. (See also joint force land component commander (JFLCC).) See FMs 1-111, 6-20, 7-20, 7-30, 17-95, 71-100, 71-123, 100-15, and 101-5.

landing area (JP 1-02) - 1. The part of the objective area within which are conducted the landing operations of an amphibious force. It includes the beach, the approaches to the beach, the transport areas, the fire support areas, the air occupied by close supporting aircraft, and the land included in the advance inland to the initial objective. 2. (Airborne) The general area used for landing troops and materiel either by airdrop or air landing. This area includes one or more drop zones or landing strips. 3. Any specially prepared or selected surface of land, water, or deck designated or used for takeoff and landing of aircraft. (See also airhead, drop zone (DZ), landing zone (LZ) and objective.) See FMs 1-111, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 31-12, 71-100-2, 71-100-3, 90-4, and 90-26.

landing beach (JP 1-02, NATO) - That portion of a shoreline usually required for the landing of a battalion landing team. However, it may also be that portion of a shoreline constituting a tactical locality (such as the shore of a bay) over which a force larger or smaller than a battalion landing team may be landed. (See also amphibious operation.) See FMs 31-12 and 71-100-2.

landing plan (JP 1-02) - In amphibious operations, a collective term referring to all individually prepared naval and landing force documents that, taken together, present in detail all instructions for execution of the ship-to-shore movement. (Army) - An airborne, air assault, or air movement plan prescribing the sequence, place of arrival, and method of entry into the objective area. The purpose of the plan is to get the correct units to the correct place in the correct order to properly execute the ground tactical plan. (See also ground tactical plan and marshalling plan.) See FMs 1-111, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 31-12, 71-100-2, 71-100-3, 90-4, and 90-26.

landing point (JP 1-02, NATO) - A point within a landing site where one helicopter or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft can land. (See also air assault, landing site, and landing zone (LZ).) See FMs 1-111, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 71-100-2, 71-100-3, 90-4, and 90-26.

landing site (JP 1-02, NATO) - 1. A site within a landing zone containing one or more landing points. 2. In amphibious operations, a continuous segment of coastline over which troops, equipment, and supplies can be landed by surface means. (Army) - A location where aircraft take off and land. See FM 71-100-2.

landing zone (LZ) (JP 1-02, NATO) - Any specified zone used for the landing of aircraft. (See also air assault and airhead.) See FMs 1-111, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 31-12, 71-100-2, 71-100-3, 90-4, and 90-26.

landing zone control party (JP 1-02, NATO) - Personnel specially trained and equipped to establish and operate communications devices from the ground for traffic control of aircraft/helicopters for a specific landing zone. (See also air assault.) See FMs 1-111, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 71-100-2, 71-100-3, and 90-4.

lane - A route through an enemy or friendly obstacle that provides a passing force safe passage. The route may be reduced and proofed as part of a breach operation, or constructed as part of a friendly obstacle. It is a clear route that moves all the way through an obstacle. (See also gap.) See FMs 5-71-100, 5-101, 5-102, and 90-13-1.

lane marker (JP 1-02, NATO) - In land mine warfare, sign used to mark a minefield lane. Lane markers, at the entrance to and exit from the lane may be referenced to a landmark or intermediate marker. (See also breach, gap, and lane.) See FMs 5-71-100, 5-101, 5-102, 90-13-1.

lapse - A marked decrease in air temperature with increasing altitude because the ground is warmer than the surrounding air. This condition usually occurs between 1100 and 1600 hours, local time, when skies are clear. Strong convection currents exist during lapse conditions. For chemical operations, the state is defined as unstable and is normally considered the most unfavorable for the release of chemical agents. (See also inversion and neutral.) See FM 3-6.

large-scale map - See map.

latent (nuclear) ineffectiveness - 1. The minimum exposure that will result in the average service member becoming performance-degraded within three hours and remaining so until death. 2. The minimum exposure that will result in the average service member becoming combat ineffective at any time within six weeks of postexposure. See FMs 8-10-7, 100-30, JPs 3-12.2, and 3-12.3.

lateral boundaries - Control measures that define the left and right limits of a unit's zone of action or sector. Together with the rear and forward boundaries and a coordinating altitude, lateral boundaries define the area of operations for a commander. See FMs 1-111, 6-20, 7-20, 7-30, 17-95, 71-100, 71-123, 100-15, and 101-5.

lateral route (JP 1-02, NATO) - A route generally parallel to the forward edge of the battle area, which crosses, or feeds into, axial routes. (See also main supply route (MSR), alternate supply route (ASR), and air corridor.) See FMs 1-111, 10-1, 63-2, 63-2-1, 63-6, 63-20, 63-21, and 71-100-3.

lateral spread (JP 1-02) - A technique used to place the mean point of impact of two or more units 100 meters apart on a line perpendicular to the gun-target line. See FM 6-40.

latest time information is of value - The time by which an intelligence organization or staff must deliver information to the requestor in order to provide decision makers with timely intelligence. This must include the time anticipated for processing and disseminating that information as well as for making the decision.

law and order operations - A military police mission that includes law enforcement, criminal investigation, and the confinement of US military prisoners. Law and order operations are conducted only when the combat commander requires it and when battle intensity permits. See FM 19-10.

law of war (JP 1-02) - That part of international law that regulates the conduct of armed hostilities. Also called the law of armed conflict. (See also rules of engagement (ROE) and rules of interaction (ROI).) See FM 27-10.

lay (JP 1-02) - 1. Direct or adjust the aim of a weapon. 2. Setting of a weapon for a given range, or for a given direction, or both. 3. To drop one or more aerial bombs or aerial mines onto the surface from an aircraft. 4. To spread a smoke screen on the ground from an aircraft. 5. To calculate or project a course. 6. To lay on: a. to execute a bomber strike; b. to set up a mission. See FMs 6-series and 7-90.

least separation distance (LSD) - The minimum distance that a desired ground zero must be separated from an object to ensure no more than a 10 percent chance of damage with a 99 percent assurance. It is the sum of the radius of preclusion and the buffer distance. See FM 100-30.

lewisite - A blister agent (an arsenical vesicant) used as a moderately delayed-action casualty agent with a persistency somewhat shorter than HD (distilled mustard). It produces effects similar to mustard, although, unlike mustard, it produces immediate pain. See FM 3-9.

liaison (JP 1-02, NATO) - That contact or intercommunication maintained between elements of military forces to ensure mutual understanding and unity of purpose and action. See FM 101-5.

liberated territory (JP 1-02, NATO) - Any area, domestic, neutral, or friendly, which, having been occupied by an enemy, is retaken by friendly forces.

lift - All helicopters assigned to a particular mission to move troops, supplies, and equipment. (See also chalk and air assault.) See FMs 1-111, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 71-100-2, 71-100-3 and 90-4.

lift fire - In direct fire, the command to raise the cone of fire so that the beaten zone strikes the target, but the space between the target and the firing weapons is safe for maneuver by friendly forces. See FMs 17-12 and 23-1.

light line (LL) (JP 1-02, NATO) - A designated line forward of which vehicles are required to use black-out lights at night. See FMs 1-111, 6-20, 7-20, 7-30, 17-95, 71-123, 71-100, 100-15, and 101-5.

limit of advance (LOA) - An easily recognized terrain feature beyond which attacking elements will not advance. (See also probable line of deployment (PLD) and final coordination line (FCL).) See FMs 1-112, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, and 71-123.

limitation - 1. Control measure, instruction, or order that restricts freedom of action. 2. An action, activity, or task that a unit is not capable of executing. This condition may be due to natural reasons such as terrain and weather or reasons such as training or equipment.

limited access route (JP 1-02, NATO) - A one way route with one or more restrictions which preclude its use by the full range of military traffic. (See also main supply route (MSR) and alternate supply route (ASR).) See FM 55-2.

limited visibility operations - Operations conducted at night and during other periods of reduced visibility. (See also limit of advance (LOA), probable line of deployment (PLD), and final coordination line (FCL).) See FMs 1-112, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, and 71-123.

limit of fire (JP1-02, NATO) - 1. The boundary marking off the area on which gunfire can be delivered. 2. Safe angular limits for firing at aerial targets. (Army) - Tactical markers used to define the sector of fire for an individual soldier, a weapon system, or a unit that prevents fratricide of adjacent units and focuses fires to kill the enemy. (See also final protective line (FPL), target reference point (TRP), and engagement area (EA).) See FMs 1-112, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 17-15, and 71-123.

line (JP 1-02, NATO) - In artillery and naval gunfire support, a spotting, or an observation, used by a spotter or an observer to indicate that a burst(s) occurred on the spotting line. (Army) - Pertains to mortar fires also. See FMs 6-series and 7-90.

line of contact (LC) - A general trace delineating the location where two opposing forces are engaged. (See also forward edge of the battle area (FEBA), forward line of own troops (FLOT), line of departure (LD), and line of departure is line of contact (LD/LC).) See FMs 1-112, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, and 71-123.

line of demarcation (LOD) - A line defining the boundary of a buffer zone or an area of limitation. A line of demarcation may also be used to define the forward limits of disputing or belligerent forces after each phase of disengagement or withdrawal has been completed.

line of departure (LD) (JP 1-02, NATO) - 1. In land warfare, a line designated to coordinate the departure of attack elements. 2. In amphibious warfare, a suitably marked offshore coordinating line to assist assault craft to land on designated beaches at scheduled times. (See also line of contact (LC) and line of departure is line of contact (LD/LC).) See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, 31-12, and 71-123. 3-15

line of departure is line of contact (LD/LC) - The designation of forward friendly positions as the LD when opposing forces are in contact. (See also line of contact (LC) and line of departure (LD).) See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, and 71-123. 3-15

line formation - An arrangement of vehicles or personnel in which elements are arranged abreast of each other. This formation permits maximum fire to front or rear and a minimum of fire to the flanks. (See also formation, movement formation, echelon formation, and column formation.) See FMs 1-112, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, and 71-123.

line haul - In highway transportation, a type of haul involving long trips over the road in which the portion of driving time is high in relation to the time consumed in loading and unloading. Line haul usually involves one trip or a portion of a trip per operating shift of 10 hours, or 2 trips per day. See FMs 55-2 and 55-10.

lines of communication (LOC) (JP 1-02) - All the routes, land, water, and air, which connect an operating military force with its base of operations and along which supplies and military forces move. (See also communications zone (COMMZ).) See FMs 10-1, 100-5, 100-7, 100-10, and 100-15.

line of sight (LOS) - The unobstructed path from a soldier, weapon, weapon sight, electronic-sending and -receiving antennas, or piece of reconnaissance equipment from one point to another. (See also intervisibility (IV).) See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, 71-100, 71-123, 100-15, and 100-20.

linkup - A meeting of friendly ground forces (such as when an advancing force reaches an objective area previously seized by an airborne or air assault force, when an encircled element breaks out to rejoin friendly forces, or when converging maneuver forces meet). (See also linkup point.) See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, 71-100, 71-123, 100-15, and 100-20.

linkup point - An easily identifiable point on the ground where two forces conduct a linkup meet. When one force is stationary, linkup points normally are established where the moving force's routes of advance intersect the stationary force's security elements. Linkup points for two moving forces are established on boundaries where the two forces are expected to converge. (See also air assault, airborne operation, breakout, and linkup.) See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, 31-20, 71-100, 71-100-3, 71-123, 90-4, 90-26, 100-15, and 100-20.

list of targets (JP 1-02) - A tabulation of confirmed or suspect targets maintained by any echelon for informational and fire support planning purposes. (See also fire plan and target list.) See FMs 6-20 series and 101-5.

load plan - A document which presents in detail all instructions for the arrangement of personnel and equipment aboard a given type aircraft or vehicle. (See also combat loading.) See FMs 7-8, 55-12, and 71-10.

local haul - In highway transportation, a type of haul characterized by short driving time in relation to loading and unloading time and normally involves four or more trips per day. See FMs 55-2 and 55-10.

local security - Those security elements established near a unit to prevent surprise by the enemy. See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, 71-100, 71-123, 100-15, and 100-20.

lock on (JP 1-02, NATO) - Signifies that a tracking or target-seeking system is continuously and automatically tracking a target in one or more coordinates (e.g., range, bearing, elevation).

lodgment area (JP 1-02) - See airhead; beachhead. (Army) - A designated area or hostile or potentially hostile territory that, when seized and held, ensures the continuous landing (buildup) of troops and materiel and provides sufficient maneuver space for buildup of combat power to resolve the crises rapidly and decisively. (See also airhead, beachhead, and opposed entry.) See FMs 1-111, 7-7, 7-8, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 17-15, 17-95, 71-100, 71-100-2, 71-100-3, 71-123, 100-15, and 100-20.

log crib - A type of point obstacle used as a roadblock where such an obstacle cannot be readily bypassed. (See also abatis, point obstacle, road block, and cratering charge.) See FMs 5-34, 5-71-100, and 5-102.

log hurdle - A type of point obstacle used to slow tracked vehicles and make them more vulnerable to antitank fires or make the tracked vehicles vulnerable to "belly shots" as they climb over the hurdles. (See also abatis, point obstacle, road block, and cratering charge.) See FMs 5-34, 5-71-100, and 5-102.

logistics (JP 1-02, NATO) - The science of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of forces. In its most comprehensive sense, those aspects of military operations which deal with: a. design and development, acquisition, storage, movement, distribution, maintenance, evacuation, and disposition of materiel; b. movement, evacuation, and hospitalization of personnel; c. acquisition or construction, maintenance, operation, and disposition of facilities; and d. acquisition or furnishing of services. (See also combat service support (CSS).) See FMs 10-1 and 100-10.

logistics assault base (LAB) (Army) - A temporary logistics support area transported across enemy lines via helicopter to support extended deep air assault operations and raids. If the LAB is to become a permanent facilitity, the unit must develop it into a forward operations base. See FM 71-100-3.

logistics base - A principal or supplementary base of support; a locality containing installations which provide logistic or support.

logistics package (LOGPAC) - A grouping of multiple classes of supplies and supply vehicles under the control of a single convoy commander. Daily LOGPACs contain a standardized allocation of supplies. Special LOGPACs can also be dispatched as needed. See FM 71-123.

logistics preparation of the battlefield (Army) - All actions taken by combat service support to maximize the means of supporting commander's plans.

logistics over the shore (LOTS) - The loading and unloading of ships without the benefit of fixed port facilities, in friendly or undefended territory, and, in time of war, during phases of theater development in which there is no enemy opposition.

logistics release point (LRP) - 1. The point along the supply route where the unit first sergeant or unit guide takes control of a company logistics package (LOGPAC). 2. The point along the supply route where the supported unit meets the supporting unit to transfer supplies. See FM 55-30.

log posts - A type of point obstacle with posts placed in belts and combined with wire and usually used as a road block or turning obstacle. To breach a belt of log posts requires an extensive breaching effort. (See also abatis, point obstacle, road block, and cratering charge.) See FMs 5-34, 5-71-100, and 5-102.

long-range surveillance (LRS) - Surveillance of an enemy force or a specified area over extended distances using long-range surveillance units; special operations forces; division, corps, theater, or national monitoring devices; or any combination of these to provide information to the commander.

lost (JP 1-02, NATO) - In artillery and naval gunfire support, a spotting, or an observation used by a spotter or an observer to indicate that rounds fired by a gun or mortar were not observed. (Army)-Pertains to mortar and direct fire gunnery also. See FM 6-series, 7-90, 7-91, 17-12, and 23-1.

low-altitude parachute extraction system (LAPES) (Army) - A low-level, self-contained extraction system capable of delivering heavy equipment or supplies via aircraft to a specified extraction zone (EZ) from an altitude of 5 to 10 feet above ground level when air landing is not feasible. See FMs 7-7, 7-10, 7-20, 7-30, 71-100-2, and 90-26.

low-level transit route (LLTR) (JP 1-02, NATO) - A temporary corridor of defined dimensions established in the forward area to minimize the risk to friendly aircraft from friendly air defenses or surface forces. (See also minimum-risk route (MRR), air corridor, and flight corridor.) See FM 100-103. 3-3


Updated 27 July 1997.

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