CHAPTER 7

BRIEFING FORMATS

Section I. Mission Analysis Briefing
Section II. Course of Action Briefing
Section III. Wargaming Briefing
Section IV. The Decision Briefing
Section V. OPLAN/OPORD Briefing
Section VI. Execution and Supervision

The following briefing formats will be used while completing tactics courses. Indicated with each briefing is the staff section that would normally present that briefing.

Section I. Mission Analysis Briefing

Before completing mission analysis, the briefer should be familiar with--

MISSION ANALYSIS BRIEFING FORMAT

Briefer Subject

CofS or G3 Purpose and agenda.

G2 Initial intelligence estimate.
a. Terrain analysis (areas of operations and interest and avenues of approach).
b. Weather analysis.
c. Threat integration with situation templates.

G3 1. Higher headquarters mission.
2. Higher headquarters intent (higher and next higher commanders).
3. Facts.
4. Assumptions.
5. Limitations on the operation.
6. Specified tasks.
7. Implied tasks.
8. Essential tasks.
9. Conclusions.
a. Shortfalls and warstoppers.
b. Recommendations.

NOTE: The G1/G4 will brief according to this format in a classroom environment. In the field, only significant items would be briefed.

G1 1. Manning (quality of life, personnel service support, and CHS portions of sustaining soldiers and their systems).
a. Facts.
(1) Personnel strengths and morale.
(2) Replacements and medical RTD.
(3) Critical shortages.

b. Assumptions.
(1) Replacements.
(2) Host nation support.
(3) Other.
c. Conclusions.
(1) Projected strengths on D-day.
(2) Projected critical MOS status on D-day.
(3) Shortfalls and warstoppers.
(4) Recommendations.

G4 2. Sustaining soldiers and their systems.
a. Facts.
(1) Class VII status.
(2) Class I, II, III(p), IV, VI, VII, X, and water status.
(3) Status of field services.
(4) Critical shortages.
b. Assumptions.
(1) Resupply rates.
(2) Host nation support.
(3) Other.
c. Conclusions.
(1) Projected supply levels and field services status on D-day.
(2) Shortfalls and warstoppers.
(3) Projected treatment capability.
(4) Recommendations.

3. Arming.
a. Facts.
(1) Class V status.
(2) Distribution system.
(3) Restrictions.
(4) Critical shortages.
b. Assumptions.
(1) Resupply rates.
(2) Host nation support.
(3) Other.
c. Conclusions.
(1) Projected supply status on D-day.
(2) Projected distribution system.
(3) Shortfalls and warstoppers.
(4) Recommendations.

4. Fueling.
a. Facts.
(1) Class III(b) status.
(2) Distribution system (FSSP, ROM, rail to tanker, pipeline, and air).
(3) Restrictions.
(4) Critical shortages.

b. Assumptions.
(1) Resupply rates.
(2) Host nation support.
(3) Other.
c. Conclusions.
(1) Projected supply status on D-day.
(2) Projected distribution system.
(3) Shortfalls and warstoppers.
(4) Recommendations.

5. Fixing.
a. Facts.
(1) Maintenance status (equipment readiness).
(2) Class IX status.
(3) Repair times, evacuation policy, and assets.
(4) Critical shortages.
b. Assumptions.
(1) Host nation support.
(2) Other.
c. Conclusions.
(1) Projected maintenance status on D-day.
(2) Shortfalls and warstoppers.
(3) Recommendations.

6. Moving.
a. Facts.
(1) Status of transportation assets.
(2) Critical LOC and MSR status (air, water, rail, road, and transfer point).
(3) Critical shortages.
b. Assumptions.
(1) Host nation support.
(2) Other.
c. Conclusions.
(1) Projected status of transportation assets on D-day.
(2) Projected status of LOCs and MSRs.
(3) Shortfalls and warstoppers.
(4) Recommendations.

G5 1. Initial CMO estimate.
a. Political analysis.
b. Economic analysis.
c. Sociological analysis.
d. Foreign nation support.
2. Assumptions.
a. Host nation support.
b. Other.
3. Conclusions.
a. Projected foreign nation support on D-day.
b. Projected host nation support on D-day.
c. Shortfalls and warstoppers.
d. Recommendations.

CofS or G3 1. Proposed restated mission.
2. Commander's guidance requested.

Section II. Course of Action Briefing

Before developing and subsequently briefing other staff members on proposed courses of action, the G3 must know and understand--

COURSE OF ACTION BRIEFING FORMAT

Briefer Subject

G2 1. Updated intelligence estimate.
a. Terrain analysis.
b. Weather analysis.
c. Threat evaluation.
2. Possible enemy course(s) of action.
Situation template(s).

G3 1. Restated mission.
2. Higher and own commander's intent.
3. Course of action statement and sketch as a single entity.
a. Sketch includes array of forces and control measures for entire operation (may be on viewgraph or butcher paper).
b. Statement includes scheme of maneuver and addresses--
(1) Battlefield framework: close, deep, rear, and security operations and reserves.
(2) The main effort.
(3) Any significant risk accepted.
4. Course of action rationale.
a. Considerations affected by possible enemy course(s) of action to be wargamed.
b. Deductions resulting from relative combat power analysis.
c. Why units are arrayed as shown on the sketch.
d. Why selected control measures are used.

G1/G4/G5 5. Updated facts and assumptions, if available.

Section III. Wargaming Briefing

Before wargaming, the wargamer must know--

Brief for each course of action wargamed.

WARGAME BRIEFING FORMAT

Briefer Subject

G3 1. Higher headquarters intent (higher and next higher or next higher commanders).
2. Mission.

G2 1. Updated intelligence estimate (terrain, weather, and enemy situation).
2. Enemy course(s) of action wargamed.

G3 1. The course of action wargamed.
2. Assumptions.
3. Wargame technique used (belt, box, avenue).
4. Critical events wargamed.
5. Entire operation visualized.
a. Each critical event.
b. Actions one level down (corps address divisions, divisions address brigades).
c. Combat, combat support, and CSS units needed for mission accomplishment.

G2 Possible enemy actions/reactions considered during the wargaming.

G3 Results of the war game.
a. Synchronization matrix.
b. Modifications to the course of action (if required).
c. Proposed task organization and organization for combat to support the course of action.
d. Decision support template and event template.
e. Priorities for combat, combat support, and CSS units.
f. Estimated time required for the operation.
g. Estimated enemy losses.
h. Estimated friendly losses.
i. Advantages to the course of action using a decision matrix.
j. Disadvantages to the course of action, including any accepted risk.

G1/G4 Significant events (as required).

Section IV. The Decision Briefing

Before comparing courses of action and subsequently briefing the commander on which course of action should be adopted, the briefers should be familiar with and have available--

DECISION BRIEFING FORMAT

Briefer Subject

G3 1. Higher headquarters intent (higher and next higher commanders).
2. Restated mission.
3. Status of own forces.

G2 Undated intelligence estimate.
a. Terrain analysis.
b. Weather analysis.
c. Enemy situation.

G3 Own course(s) of action.

G3, G2, 1. Assumptions used in planning.
G1, G4, and 2. Results of staff estimate.
G5 in order 3. Advantages and disadvantages (including risk) of each course of action (with decision matrix or table showing course of action comparison).
4. Recommended course of action (may differ from other staff).

CS/XO Recommended course of action.

Section V. OPLAN/OPORD Briefing

Before briefing the OPLAN or OPORD, the briefer must be familiar with and have available--

OPORD/OPLAN BRIEFING FORMAT

Briefer Subject

G3 1. Higher headquarters intent (higher and next higher commanders).
2. Assumptions (OPLAN).

G2 Updated intelligence estimate.
a. Terrain analysis.
b. Weather analysis.
c. Enemy situation.

G3 1. Paragraph 2--Mission Statement (viewgraph or butcher paper).
2. Task organization (viewgraph or butcher paper).
3. Subparagraph 3a--Concept of Operation (use operation overlay for illustration).
a. Scheme of maneuver in terms of battlefield framework.
b. Main effort.
c. Fire support (fire support coordinator may brief here).
d. GS priorities.
e. Decision support template and matrix.
4. Subparagraph 3b--Tasks to Maneuver Units.
5. Subparagraph 3d--Coordinating Instructions.

G4/G1 Subparagraph 4a--General Support Concept (use CSS overlay for illustration).
a. A brief synopsis of the support command mission.
b. Support command headquarters/support area locations, including locations of next higher logistics bases.
c. Next higher's support priorities and where the units fit into those priorities.
d. Support priorities.
e. Units in the next higher supporting CSS organization.
f. Significant/unusual CSS with impact on overall operational phases.
g. Before operations in terms of significant, critical, non-SOP, or unusual sustainment functions and external and internal priorities.
h. During operations in terms of significant, critical, non-SOP, or unusual sustainment functions and external priorities. (The during portion of the concept of support is phased if the concept of the operation is phased.)
i. After operations in terms of significant, critical, non-SOP, or unusual sustainment functions and external and internal priorities.
j. Any significant risks.

NOTE: Additional CSS information--manning (personnel services and CHS), sustaining the soldier (supply and field services), arming, fueling, fixing, and moving--may be in subparagraphs or in a separate service support plan/order.

G5 Subparagraph 4e--Civil-Military Cooperation--before, during, and after operations (this information may instead be in a separate annex).

G3 Paragraph 5--Command and Signal.

Section VI. Execution and Supervision

During order execution, the staff and commander continually process the latest information, determining where and how it affects the operation. They enter the decisionmaking process based on the type of information received, arrive at a decision, determine the actions required, and issue the orders to execute those actions. Actions and orders are ongoing at all levels of command and at all command posts, each dealing with their areas of responsibility. This may require going through the entire process again or may mean only minor changes as the impact of facts and assumptions is determined. Regardless, the staff and commander must actively focus on retaining or regaining the initiative during the current operation.

Supervision is ongoing throughout the decisionmaking process whether it pertains to current or future operations. Through supervision, the commander ensures his decisions are implemented and his intent is understood.

Once the orders are issued, commanders supervise the preparation and execution. Supervision spans a wide variety of activities, including synchronizing the battle and leadership. The commander attempts to orchestrate the battle in concert with the original plan that everyone understands; however, the unit must understand the commander's intent and be prepared for change based on any new situation.

Continuity must be maintained and turmoil reduced to a minimum. Synchronization is essential to retain the initiative. Communications must not interfere with subordinate commanders' responsibilities but rather should ensure or verify that the mission is being accomplished IAW the overall intent of the force commander and commanders two echelons above the force headquarters. All actions the commander and staff take must--