Index JOINT STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES PLAN
PRAIRIE WARRIOR 2000 - FOR INSTRUCTIONAL USE ONLY


ENCLOSURE E (3110.01)

REGIONAL PLANS

 

1. Authority. Execution authority for all plans rests with the NCA. Commanders exercise authority, command, and discharge responsibilities as directed by the Unified Command Plan (UCP) and Unified Action Armed Forces (UNAAF).

2. Regional Plans

a. General. The focus for current planning is regional, and conflict may arise under a variety of circumstances from slow-building to imminent conflict situations.

b. Planning Assumptions. Assumptions governing regional conflicts, applicable to all CINCs, are in table E-1 and will be incorporated into operation plans as appropriate. Items not under US control must be covered by plan assumptions concerning them.

TABLE E-1

JSCP REGIONAL ASSUMPTIONS

CY 9X-9Y JSCP REGIONAL ASSUMPTIONS

 

R-1 No Attacks on US assets in space

R-2 CINCs will plan to use the mobilization and transport necessary to move and sustain the forces.

R-3 LOCs outside the theater will remain open.

R-4 The threatened nation will furnish bases for reinforce-ment and support.

R-5 PWRMS will be per FY 19__ programs.

R-6 Use of WMD by states known to possess them is possible.

R-7 Mobilization will not occur except as noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

c. Common Tasks and Planning Considerations. A number of tasks and planning considerations are common to all commands. Table E-2 lists selected common regional tasks. Commands may develop plans for the situations the commander considers necessary. Planning considerations are included to assist the development of OPLANs, CONPLANs, and Concept Summaries.

TABLE E-2

COMMON REGIONAL TASKS

 

(1) Rules of Engagement

(2) Movement of Forces

(3) Command Relationships

(4) Nuclear Weapons Control

(5) Intelligence Coordination

(6) Special Operations

(7) Civil Affairs

(8) Host-Nation Support

(9) Deescalation/Conflict Termination

(10) Support for Host-nation Restoration

(11) Continuity of Operations

(12) Conduct Exercises

(13) Reconnaissance Operations

(14) Maritime Operations

(15) Air Traffic Control

(16) NASA Support

(17) Humanitarian Assistance

(18) Enemy Prisoners of War (EPWs)

(19) Military Deception

(20) Search and Rescue

(21) Psychological Operations

(1) Rules of Engagement (ROE). Establish and maintain ROE in conformity with peacetime ROE for US Forces. Submit proposed ROE for those situations not covered by existing rules to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for review and approval or staffing and forwarding to the NCA for approval.

(2) Movement of Forces. When appropriate, include considerations for the movement of forces as specified in Forces (enclosure D). Plan operations security (OPSEC) and deception as required.

(3) Command Relationships. Supporting CINCs coordinate planning with supported CINCs, participate in the planning process, and prepare supporting plans, as required. Commanders establish relationships with international commands, organizations, and activities and participate in combined planning, as required. Include necessary actions to receive and deploy units and support contingency deployments.

(4) Nuclear Weapons Control. Not applicable

(5) Intelligence Coordination. See Supplement 3110.02.

(6) Special Operations. Coordinate with USCINCSOC on special operations matters.

(7) Civil Affairs (CA). Conduct CA activities in support of US National Military Strategy to successfully fulfill the US legal and treaty obligations, coordinate host-nation and nation-building activities, and, if necessary, perform additional civil-military operations.

(8) Host-Nation Support. Include provisions for using HNS to meet in-country and in-theater requirements. Areas for consideration of HNS programs are reception and onward movement of forces and selected logistic and security functions.

(9) De-escalation and Post-Conflict Planning. Include considerations for de-escalation, crisis termination, and post-conflict requirements throughout the planning cycle as required.

(10) Support for Host-Nation Restoration. At the conclusion of hostilities planning for and the implementation of operations directed at normalization of host-nation operations will take place. Interagency coordination and responsibilities will dominate as priorities and requirements are identified and programs implemented with the consensus of the host-nation leadership.

(11) Continuity of Operations. The integration of military and civil operations is complicated but paramount to the accomplishment of US objectives or maintenance of US interests in any contingency.

(12) Exercises. Plan and conduct exercises across the operational continuum. Project positive perceptions of US and allied capabilities to respond credibly to any crisis. Exercises should consider interoperability; incorporate indications; warning and alerting procedures; joint and combined command, control, and communications (C3) involving the National Military Command System (NMCS); and tests of selected military and supporting civil functions. Commands will submit after-action reports on exercises.

(13) Reconnaissance Operations. Plan for maximum efficient use of all available assets.

(14) Maritime Options. The following range of maritime options should be included in plans.

(a) From conducting reconnaissance and surveillance operations to seizing and destroying the ships and aircraft of hostile nations and conducting aerial minelaying.

(b) Controlling and protecting US and allied shipping and LOCs in critical areas.

(c) Conducting mine countermeasures operations against mine warfare operations by hostile forces.

(d) Deploying amphibious forces and/or maritime pre-positioned force squadrons or pre-positioning ships to the region as an indication of the possible use of ground forces or for the purposes of deception or surveillance.

(15) Air Traffic Control. Include provisions in existing plans for continued support by the FAA for air traffic control operations in the AORs of the combatant commands during periods of war or national emergency.

(16) NASA Support. Support NASA, as directed, and be prepared to conduct search and rescue missions in support of the space transportation system (STS).

(17) Humanitarian Assistance. Hurricanes, typhoons, earthquakes, drought, and man-made events may require DOD forces to lend support to government disaster relief assistance agencies with minimum notice and support civil agencies, as directed by the DOD executive agent.

(18) Enemy Prisoners of War. Include provisions for the internment of EPWs.

(19) Military Deception. Conduct military deception operations to support OPSEC, deterrence, preparation for hostilities, intervention operations, combat operations, and attainment of other strategic objectives. (See enclosure C to 3110.09)

(20) Search and Rescue. Establish a theater search and rescue system for the recovery of personnel and materiel. Include provisions for coordinating the capabilities of available theater Service and allied resources.

(21) Psychological Operations. Conduct psychological operations (PSYOP) in coordination with the chiefs of US diplomatic missions in support of national objectives, policies, interests, and military missions. (See enclosure B to 3110.09)

3. Regional Planning

a. General. As discussed in enclosure C, Planning Guidance, CINCs may be required to prepare operation plans for either major regional contingencies (MRCs) or lessor regional contingencies (LRCs) by preparing OPLANs, CONPLANs, and Concept Summaries.

b. Regional Planning--Forward Presence Operations. To help deter regional conflicts and promote stability, especially in Third World countries, innovative strategies are required to support representative governments. The intent is to undertake a policy of forward presence, including diplomatic, political, economic, and military actions aimed at preventing conflict, enhancing regional stability, and building coalition. In general, forward presence operations are categorized as follows: operational training and deployment; security assistance (including peacekeeping operations); protecting us citizens abroad (including neo and combating terrorism); combating drugs; and humanitarian assistance. By engaging in these activities we strengthen deterrence, build US influence, develop alliance cohesion, and contribute to the prevention of war.

(1) Guiding Principle. The guiding principle for US involvement is deterrence. The responsibility for resolving interregional conflict lies with the host nation. Unless that nation is willing and able politically to solve its problems, no amount of US assistance will ensure a lasting solution. The strategic environment is characterized by a mix of conditions and threats that can be dealt with only by a balanced application of the elements of national power: political, economic, diplomatic, and military. Strategies and plans must reflect US national interests and be realistic in expectation. Planning should include national power options that, when directed by the NCA, permit rapid transition from periods of peace to conflict and back to peace.

(2) Planning Considerations. Planning for and conducting forward presence operations should consider the following:

(a) Primacy of the Political Element. Political objectives affect military planning at every level. Courses of action may often slip outside traditional military doctrine.

(b) Unity of Effort. Efforts from other government agencies and host-nation institutions must be integrated and coordinated during OPLAN and CONPLAN development.

(c) Adaptability. The skill and willingness to modify doctrine, tactics, techniques, procedures, training, equipment, and organization is necessary for successful operations.

(d) Legitimacy. Legitimacy of the host nation is a central concern to all parties involved. Military contributions and operations should be designed to enhance the host nation's position and legitimacy.

(e) Perseverance. Civilian and military leaders may have to reject limited or short-term objectives and successes in favor of actions supporting long-term goals.

(f) Restricted Use of Force. ROEs will usually be more restrictive, more detailed, and subject to more political scrutiny than in other types of conflicts. The use of force should be only that necessary to solve the particular problem at hand.

(3) Forward Presence Operations. Detailed discussion of forward presence operations and planning guidance and considerations for security assistance, protecting US citizens abroad (including NEO and combating terrorism), combating drugs, and humanitarian assistance are found in supplemental instruction 3110.14, "Military Operations Other Than War."

4. Regional Tasks--Specific. Specific regional objectives, tasks, and force apportionments are listed in the following sections.

a. USCINCPAC

(1) Objectives

(a) Northeast Asia-Northwest Pacific. In close coordination with the Republic of Chosun and Japan, deter the threat or use of force within the region. Improve Japanese and Chosun defense capabilities to defend against, and if necessary, defeat military threats posed to the political and territorial integrity of Japan and Chosun

(b) Eastland. Foster a broad based political, economic and military

relationship with Eastland so as to promote Eastland policies that are stabilizing within

the region and lead to peaceful change without resort to conflict to settle regional

disputes. Support U.S. obligations to Taiwan to assist in the peaceful and democratic

resolution of Taiwan’s future political status

(c) Surran. In close coordination with Pacifica, deter the threat or use of force in the region.

(d) Pacifica. Maintain stability and peace. Deter the threat or use of force in the region. Improve Pacifican defense capabilities to defend against, and if necessary, defeat military threats posed to the political and territorial integrity of Pacifica.

(e) Indonesia. Increase support to the Indonesian Government to improve their military capability to oust the New National Movement (NNM) from Northern Sumatra.

(f) Southeast Asia. Foster the abilities of South East Asian states to defend against external threats to individual countries and the region, and against subversive forces internally that would destabilize and replace governments in place by other than democratic processes.

(g) Freedom of Navigation- Indian Ocean Area. Promote stability in the

countries of the region and within the region as a whole. Limit the proliferation of

weapons of mass destruction and deter their use by those countries that already

possess WMD capability. Ensure that freedom of navigation is maintained throughout

the region in accordance with the Law of the Sea Treaty and international law.

(h) Regional Support to U.S. Objectives. Increase in the countries of the region support for US policies and diplomatic initiatives, including support for U.S. crisis actions. Support fostered should encompass political unity, access to base and overflight rights, and military contributions to common regional objectives to maintain and, if necessary, restore the peace and stability of the region.

(2) USCINCPAC Regional Tasking

(a) Specific tasking for USCINCPAC are listed in Table E-3A. All common tasks that are listed in Table E-2 are to be included in these operation plans. Assumptions are contained in Table E-1.

 

TABLE E-3A

USCINCPAC ASSIGNED REGIONAL TASKS (RT)

 

CINC TASKINGS

ASSUMPTIONS

SUPPORTING CINCS

RT-1 Develop and maintain bilateral OPLANs for the defense of Chosun against any external threats, including use of WMD.

R-1, R-2, R-3, R-4, R-5, R-6, R-7

USCINCACOM, USCINCCENT

USCINCEUR, USCINCSOC

USCINCSPACE, USCINCSTRAT

USCINCTRANS

RT-2 Develop CONPLANs for the defense of Pacifica against any external threats, including use of WMD.

 

 

R-1, R-2, R-3, R-4, R-5, R-6, R-7

USCINCACOM, USCINCCENT

USCINCEUR, USCINCSOC

USCINCSPACE, USCINCSTRAT

USCINCTRANS

RT-3 Develop bilateral plans for cooperative defense of Japan, including use of WMD. Planning should maximize Japanese efforts to contribute to their own defense.

 

 

 

 

 

RT-4 Develop a series of concept plans to support countries within South East/South West Asia threatened with external attack or internal subversion.

 

 

 

 

 

RT-5 Develop a series of concept plans to ensure freedom of navigation.

 

 

 

 

 

RT-6 Peacefully engage Eastland to foster broad based military relationships to promote stability.

 

 

 

 

 

RT-7 Develop bilateral plans for cooperative defense of Indonesia, including use of WMD. Planning should maximize Indonesian efforts to contribute to their own defense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3) USCINCPAC Regional Force Tables. Regional forces apportioned for planning are listed in Table E-3B.

 

TABLE E-3B

USPACOM FORCES APPORTIONED FOR REGIONAL CONTINGENCY PLANNING

1. FLEXIBLE DETERRENT OPTION (AMBIGUOUS WARNING, SLOW BUILDING CRISIS)



	Available	Location	Source
ARMY FORCES--IN-PLACE
HQ Eighth US Army		CHOSUN	PACOM
2nd Inf Div (M)(-)		CHOSUN	PACOM
1st Bn, 1st SFG		OKINAWA	PACOM
1-47 ADA (Patriot)		CHOSUN	PACOM

AIR FORCE FORCES--IN-PLACE
1 FTR WING/3 SDNS (F-15)		JAPAN	USPACOM
1 FTR WING/3 SDNS (F-15)		ALASKA	USPACOM
1 FTR WING/2 SDNS (F-16)		JAPAN	USPACOM
1 FTR WING/2 SDNS (F-16)		ALASKA	USPACOM
6X E-3 (AWACS) 		JAPAN	USPACOM
2X E-3 (AWACS)		ALASKA	USPACOM
1 SOG/3 SDNS (MC-130, MH-53)									   JAPAN			    USPACOM


NAVAL FORCES--IN-PLACE	
CARRIER BATTLE GROUP (CVBG)
CV(1)				USPACOM
CG(1)				USPACOM
DDG(1)				USPACOM
DD(2)				USPACOM
FFG(2)				USPACOM
SSN(2)				USPACOM
SURFACE ACTION GROUP (SAG)
CG(1)				USPACOM
DDG(1)				USPACOM
DD(2)				USPACOM
FFG(2)				USPACOM
SSN(1)				USPACOM


AMPHIB SQDN (w/MEU(SOC)		OKINAWA	USPACOM
MPS Sqdn 2,3		GUAM/SAIPAN	USPACOM
P-3 Sqdn (1) 		JAPAN	USPACOM


SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES--IN-PLACE
SPECIAL FORCES BN (1) 	N+1	OKINAWA	USPACOM
SOF THEATER NSWTG (1) 	N+1	GUAM	USPACOM
AFSOF DET (1) 	N+1	CHOSUN	USPACOM


ARMY FORCES--AUGMENTATION
HQ I CORPS 	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
21ST INF DIV (L)(-)	N+4	HAWAII	USPACOM
3RD BDE, 2ND INF DIV (M)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1ST BDE, 21ST INF DIV (L)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1ST SFG (-)	N-2	CONUS	SOCOM
RGR BN	N+2	CONUS	SOCOM
160 SOAR	N+4	CONUS	SOCOM

	Available	Location	Source


AIR FORCE FORCES--AUGMENTATION
AWACS (E-3)(3 ACFT)	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
JSTARS (E-8)(4 AIRCRAFT) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
TAC FIGHTER SQDN(F-15C/D)(1) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
TAC FIGHTER SQDN (IND)(F-15E)(1) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
TAC FIGHTER SQDN (IND)(A-10)(1) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
STRATEGIC BOMBER SQDN (IND) (B-52)(1) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
TAC FIGHTER SQDN(IND)(F-117)(1) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
AIR REFUELING DET(KC-135)(2)(3PAA EA)	N+1	CONUS	USACOM

AIR FORCE FORCES--AUGMENTATION (Reserve/ANG)
TAC FIGHTER SQDN (IND)(F-16C/ECM)(1) 	N+7	CONUS	USACOM
TAC FIGHTER SQDN(R)(F-15E)(1) 	N+7	CONUS	USACOM
TAC FIGHTER SQDN (R)(A-10)(1) 	N+7	CONUS	USACOM
TAC AIRLIFT SQDN (R/ANG)(C-130)(2) 	N+7	CONUS	USACOM
AIR REFUELING ELEM(KC-135)(1)(3PAA)	N+7	CONUS	USACOM


	Available	Location	Source
NAVAL FORCES-AUGMENTATION
CARRIER BATTLE GROUP (CVBG)
CV(1)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
CG(1)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
DDG(1)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
DD(2)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
FFG(2)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
SSN(2)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
SURFACE ACTION GROUP (SAG)
CG(1)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
DDG(1)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
DD(2)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
FFG(2)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
SSN(1)		N+4	CONUS	USACOM
AMPHIBIOUS GROUP	N+10	CONUS	USACOM
MEF(FWD)(MPS)	N+10	CONUS	USACOM
MEF(FWD)(AMPHIB)	N+10	CONUS	USACOM
SSN W/DRY DECK SHELTER (1)	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
P-3 SQDN (1) 	N+1	CONUS	USACOM
MCM(1)	N+3	CONUS	USACOM
MSO(1)		N+3	CONUS	USACOM


		Available	Location	Source

SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES-AUGMENTATION
NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE TASK GROUP (1) 	N+1	CONUS	USSOCOM
AIR FORCE SPEC OPS WING (SOW)(1) 	N+1	CONUS	USSOCOM
SPECIAL FORCES BN	N+1	CONUS	USSOCOM
RANGER BN (1) 	N+1	CONUS	USSOCOM
PSYOP TASK GROUP (1) 	N+1	CONUS	USSOCOM
CIVIL AFFAIRS BN (1) 	N+1	CONUS	USSOCOM


2.  MAJOR FLEXIBLE DETERRENT OPTION (AMBIGUOUS WARNING, STRONG SIGNAL OF U.S. RESOLVE)

ARMY FORCES	Available	Location	Source
4TH INF DIV	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
3RD ACR	N+30	CONUS	USACOM
17TH AVN BDE	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
3-43 ADA (PATRIOT)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM

AIR FORCE FORCES
1 COMP WING/3 SQNS (F-15/16	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
3XE-3 (AWACS)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
2XE-8 (JSTARS)	N+4 	CONUS	USACOM

NAVY FORCES
1 CVBG	N+1		USPACOM
1 MCM		N+2		USPACOM
MPS/MEF FWD OR	N+1		USPACOM
  	1 AMP/MEF FWD	N+3		USPACOM

3.  DEPLOY DECISIVE FORCE (UNAMBIGUOUS WARNING, CONFLICT IMMINENT)

ARMY FORCES	Available	Location	Source
47TH AIR ASSAULT DIV	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
29TH SEP INF BDE	N+90	HAWAII	USPACOM
41ST SEP INF BDE	N+90	CONUS	USACOM

AIR FORCE FORCES
1 BOMBER WING/1 SQDN (B-1)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1 BOMBER SQDN (B-1)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM
1 FTR WING/3 SQDN (F-15)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM
1 FTR WING/3 SQDN (F-16)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM

NAVY FORCES
1 SSN		N+1		USPACOM
1 CVBG	N+1		USACOM
1 MCM		N+2		USPACOM
1 AMP/MEF FWD	N+3		USPACOM

4.  COUNTER ATTACK/OVERWHELMING FORCE (NO WARNING ATTACK)

ARMY FORCES	Available	Location	Source		
HQ XVIII ABN CORPS	N+2	CONUS	USACOM
3RD INF DIV	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1ST CAV DIV	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
3RD BDE, 1ST ARMD DIV	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
81ST INF BDE	M+90	CONUS	USACOM
116TH ARMD BDE	M+90	CONUS	USACOM
2ND ACR	N+4	CONUS	USACOM

66TH AVN BDE	M+180	CONUS	USACOM
2-43 ADA (PATRIOT)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
5-52 ADA (PATRIOT)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM

AIR FORCE FORCES
1 BOMBER WING/1 SQDN (B-1)	N+4	CONUS 	USACOM
1 BOMBER SQND (B-1B)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM
1 BOMBER WING/2 SQDN (B-2)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1 FTR WING/3 SQDN (F-117)	N+4 	CONUS	USACOM
1 FTR WING/3 SQDN (F-16)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1 FTR WING/7 SQDN (F-16)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM
2 FTR WING/2 SQDN (F-16)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM
12XE-3 (AWACS)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
4XE-8 (JSTARS)	N+4 	CONUS	USACOM

NAVY FORCES
2 SSN		N+1		LANT/PAC
2 CVBG		N+3		LANT/PAC
1 SAG		N+3		USACOM
1 MPS/MEF FWD	N+1	MED SEA	EUCOM
1 AMP/MEF FWD	N+3		USACOM
1 MEU (SOC)	N		USACOM


SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES
20TH SFG	M+30	CONUS 	USACOM
2 SPECIAL OPS SQDN (AC-130,MH-60)	N+4	CONUS	USACOM
1 SOG/1 SQDN (COMMANDO SOLO)	M+30	CONUS	USACOM	

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK