Joint Staff Officers Guide AFSC Pub 1 -- 1997

Appendix O Definitions

acceptability. (DOD) Operation plan review criterion. The determination whether the contemplated course of action is worth the cost in manpower, materiel, and time involved; is consistent with the law of war; and militarily and politically supportable. See also adequacy; completeness; feasibility; suitability.

accompanying supplies. (DOD) Unit supplies that deploy with forces. (JP 1-02)

adaptive planning. The concept that calls for development of a range of options, encompassing the elements of national power (diplomatic, political, economic, and military), during deliberate planning that can be adapted to a crisis as it develops. These options are referred to as Flexible Deterrent Options (FDOS). (adapted from the National Military Strategy)

adequacy. (DOD) Operation plan review criterion. The determination whether the scope and concept of a planned operation are sufficient to accomplish the task assigned. See also acceptability; completeness; feasibility; suitability. (JP 1-02)

administrative landing. (DOD) An unopposed landing involving debarkation from vehicles which have been administratively loaded. (JP 1-02)

aerial port. (DOD) An airfield that has been designated for the sustained air movement of personnel and materiel, and to serve as an authorized port for entrance into or departure from the country in which located. (JP 1-02)

airhead. (DOD, NATO) 1. A designated area in a hostile or threatened territory which, when seized and held, ensures the continuous air landing of troops and materiel and provides the maneuver space necessary for projected operations. Normally it is the area seized in the assault phase of an airborne operation. 2. A designated location in an area of operations used as a base for supply and evacuation by air. See also beachhead. (JP 1-02)

air movement. (DOD, NATO) Air transport of units, personnel, supplies, equipment, and materiel. (Approved by JMTGM# 046-95)

alert order. (DOD) 1. A crisis-action planning directive from the Secretary of Defense, issued by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, that provides essential guidance for planning and directs the initiation of execution planning for the selected course of action authorized by the Secretary of Defense. 2. A planning directive that provides essential planning guidance and directs the initiation of execution planning after the directing authority approves a military course of action. An alert order does not authorize execution of the approved course of action. See also course of action; crisis action planning; execution planning. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

alliance. (DOD) An alliance is the result of formal agreements (i.e., treaties) between two or more nations for broad, long-term objectives which further the common interests of the members. See also coalition. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

allocation. (DOD) In a general sense, distribution of limited resources among competing requirements for employment. Specific allocations (e.g., air sorties, nuclear weapons, forces, and transportation) are described as allocation of air sorties, nuclear weapons, etc. See also apportionment. (JP 1-02)

annex. (DOD) A document appended to an operation order or other document to make it clearer or to give further details. (JP 1-02)

apportionment. (DOD) In the general sense, distribution for planning of limited resources among competing requirements. Specific apportionments (e.g., air sorties and forces for planning) are described as apportionment of air sorties and forces for planning, etc. See also allocation. (JP 1-02)

apportionment (budget). The funds appropriated by Congress that are allocated by the Office of Management and Budget to a federal department. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

appreciations. (DOD) Personal conclusions, official estimates, and assumptions about another partyís intentions, military capabilities, and activities used in planning and decisionmaking. a. desired appreciations--Adversary personal conclusions and official estimates, valid or invalid, that result in adversary behaviors and official actions advantageous to friendly interests and objectives. b. harmful appreciations--Adversary personal conclusions, official estimates, or assumptions, valid or invalid, that result in adversary behaviors and official actions harmful to friendly interests and objectives. (JP 1-02)

appropriation act. An act of Congress that permits federal agencies to incur obligations and make payments out of the treasury for a specified period of time and purpose. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

area of operations. (DOD) An operational area defined by the joint force commander for land and naval forces. Areas of operation do not typically encompass the entire operational area of the joint force commander, but should be large enough for component commanders to accomplish their missions and protect their forces. See also area of responsibility. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

area of responsibility. (DOD) 1. The geographical area associated with a combatant command within which a combatant commander has authority to plan and conduct operations. 2. In naval usage, a predefined area of enemy terrain for which supporting ships are responsible for covering by fire on known targets or targets of opportunity and by observation. Also called AOR. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

Armed Services Medical Regulating Office. (DOD) A joint activity reporting directly to the Commander in Chief, US Transportation Command, the Department of Defense single manager for the regulation of movement of Uniformed Services patients. The Armed Services Medical Regulating Office authorizes transfers to medical treatment facilities of the Military Departments or the Department of Veterans Affairs and coordinates inter-theater and inside continental United States patient movement requirements with the appropriate transportation component commands of US Transportation Command. Also called ASMRO. (JP 1-02)

assembly area. (DOD, NATO) 1. An area in which a command is assembled preparatory to further action. 2. In a supply installation, the gross area used for collecting and combining components into complete units, kits, or assemblies. (JP 1-02)

assign. (DOD, NATO) 1. To place units or personnel in an organization where such placement is relatively permanent, and/or where such organization controls and administers the units or personnel for the primary function, or greater portion of the functions, of the unit or personnel. 2. To detail individuals to specific duties or functions where such duties or functions are primary and/or relatively permanent. See also attached forces.

(JP 1-02)

assigned forces. Forces and resources placed under the combatant command of a CINC by the Secretary of Defense in his "Forces for Unified Command" memorandum and available for normal peacetime operations. (Userís Guide for Joint Operation Planning)

assumption. (DOD) A supposition on the current situation or a presupposition on the future course of events, either or both assumed to be true in the absence of positive proof, necessary to enable the commander in the process of planning to complete an estimate of the situation and make a decision on the course of action. (JP 1-02)

attached forces. Units or personnel placed in an organization where such placement is relatively temporary. (adapted from JP 1-02)

augmentation forces. (DOD) Forces to be transferred from a supporting commander to the combatant command (command authority) or operational control of a supported commander during the execution of an operation order approved by the National Command Authorities. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

authorizing legislation. Congressional legislation that sets up or continues the legal operations of a federal program or agency. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

automated information system. A combination of information, computer, and telecommunications resources and other information technology and personnel resources that collects, records, processes, stores, communicates, retrieves, and displays information. (Joint Pub 6-0)

available-to-load date. (DOD) A day, relative to C-day in a time-phased force and deployment data, that unit and nonunit equipment and forces can begin loading on an aircraft or ship at the port of embarkation. Also called ALD. (JP 1-02)

basic load. (DOD, NATO) The quantity of supplies required to be on hand within, and which can be moved by, a unit or formation. It is expressed according to the wartime organization of the unit or formation and maintained at the prescribed levels.

basic plan. The part of an operation plan that forms the base structure for annexes and appendixes. It consists of general statements about the situation, mission, execution, administration and logistics, and command and control. (adapted from Joint Pub 5-03.2)

beachhead. (DOD) A designated area on a hostile or potentially hostile shore that, when seized and held, ensures the continuous landing of troops and materiel, and provides maneuver space requisite for subsequent projected operations ashore. (JP 1-02)

breakbulk cargo. Any commodity that, because of its weight, dimensions, or incompatibility with other cargo, must be shipped by mode other than MILVAN or SEAVAN. (AR 55-9/NAVSUPINST 4600.79/AFR 75-10/MCO 4610.31)

budget authority. Authority conferred by law to enter into obligations, that is, appropriations, authority to borrow, or contract authority, that will result in immediate or future outlays involving Government funds. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

budget estimates submission. Service and DOD agency budget estimates based on approved programs in the Program Decision Memorandums and the most recent fiscal and monetary guidelines and assumptions. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

bulk cargo. (DOD) That which is generally shipped in volume where the transportation conveyance is the only external container; such as liquids, ore, or grain. (JP 1-02)

campaign. (DOD) A series of related military operations aimed at accomplishing a strategic or operational objective within a given time and space. See also campaign plan.

(JP 1-02)

campaign planning. (DOD) The process whereby combatant commanders and subordinate joint force commanders translate national or theater strategy into operational concepts through the development of campaign plans. Campaign planning may begin during deliberate planning when the actual threat, national guidance, and available resources become evident, but is normally not completed until after the National Command Authorities select the course of action during crisis action planning. Campaign planning is conducted when contemplated military operations exceed the scope of a single major joint operation. See also campaign. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

capabilities-based planning. Planning based on programmed forces, equipment, and supplies that are either available now or expected to be available at the end of a specific planning period. (Userís Guide for Joint Operation Planning)

cargo. (DOD, NATO) Commodities and supplies in transit. See also air cargo; dangerous cargo; essential cargo; immediately vital cargo; unwanted cargo; valuable cargo; wanted cargo. (JP 1-02)

cargo increment number. A seven-character alphanumeric field that uniquely describes a nonunit cargo entry in a TPFDD. The first two characters identify the Service and the type of cargo; the last five are the CIN assignment. (adapted from JOPES Userís Manual)

casualty. (DOD) Any person who is lost to the organization by having been declared dead, duty status - whereabouts unknown, missing, ill, or injured. (JP 1-02)

centers of gravity. (DOD) Those characteristics, capabilities, or localities from which a military force derives its freedom of action, physical strength, or will to fight. (JP 1-02)

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The principal military adviser to the President, the National Security Council, and the Secretary of Defense.

CINCís required date. (DOD) The original date relative to C-day, specified by the combatant commander for arrival of forces or cargo at the destination; shown in the time-phased force and deployment data to assess the impact of later arrival. Also called CRD. (JP 1-02)

CINCís Strategic Concept. (DOD) Final document produced in Step 5 of the concept development phase of the deliberate planning process. The CINCís strategic concept is used as the vehicle to distribute the CINCís decision and planning guidance for accomplishing joint strategic capabilities plan or other Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) taskings. CJCS approval of the strategic concept becomes the basis of the plan for development into an operation plan or operation plan in concept format. Formerly called "the concept of operations." Also called CSC. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

civil affairs. (DOD) The activities of a commander that establish, maintain, influence, or exploit relations between military forces and civil authorities, both governmental and nongovernmental, and the civilian populace in a friendly, neutral, or hostile area of operations in order to facilitate military operations and consolidate operational objectives. Civil affairs may include performance by military forces of activities and functions normally the responsibility of local government. These activities may occur prior to, during, or subsequent to other military actions. They may also occur, if directed, in the absence of other military operations. (JP 1-02)

civil engineering support plan. (DOD) An appendix to the Logistics annex or separate annex of an operation plan that identifies the minimum essential engineering services and construction requirements required to support the commitment of military forces. Also called CESP. See also operation plan. (Approved by JMTGM# 009-96)

civil reserve air fleet. (DOD) A program in which the Department of Defense uses aircraft owned by a US entity or citizen. The aircraft are allocated by the Department of Transportation to augment the military airlift capability of the Department of Defense (DOD). These aircraft are allocated, in accordance with DOD requirements, to segments, according to their capabilities, such as Long-Range International (cargo and passenger), Short-Range International, Domestic, Alaskan, Aeromedical, and other segments as may be mutually agreed upon by the Department of Defense and the Department of Transportation. The Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) can be incrementally activated by the Department of Defense in three stages in response to defense-oriented situations, up to and including a declared national emergency or war, to satisfy DOD airlift requirements. When activated, CRAF aircraft are under the mission control of the Department of Defense while remaining a civil resource under the operational control of the responsible US entity or citizen. Also called CRAF. a. CRAF Stage I. This stage involves DOD use of civil air resources that air carriers will furnish to the Department of Defense to support substantially expanded peacetime military airlift requirements. The Commander, Air Mobility Command, may authorize activation of this stage and assume mission control of those airlift assets committed to CRAF Stage I. b. CRAF Stage II. This stage involves DOD use of civil air resources that the air carriers will furnish to Department of Defense in a time of defense airlift emergency. The Secretary of Defense, or designee, may authorize activation of this stage permitting the Commander, Air Mobility Command, to assume mission control of those airlift assets committed to CRAF Stage II. c. CRAF Stage III. This stage involves DOD use of civil air resources owned by a US entity or citizen that the air carriers will furnish to the Department of Defense in a time of declared national defense-oriented emergency or war, or when otherwise necessary for the national defense. The aircraft in this stage are allocated by the Secretary of Transportation to the Secretary of Defense. The Secretary of Defense may authorize activation of this stage permitting the Commander, Air Mobility Command, to assume mission control of those airlift assets committed to CRAF Stage III. (JP 1-02)

close-hold plan. (DOD) Operation plan with access to operation plan information extremely limited to specifically designated Worldwide Military Command and Control System user IDs and terminal IDs during initial course of action development before the involvement of outside commands, agencies, combatant commanders, Services, or the Joint Staff. (JP 1-02)

closure. (DOD) In transportation, the process of a unit arriving at a specified location. It begins when the first element arrives at a designated location, e.g., port of entry/port of departure, intermediate stops, or final destination, and ends when the last element does likewise. For the purposes of studies and command post exercises, a unit is considered essentially closed after 95 percent of its movement requirements for personnel and equipment are completed. (JP 1-02)

closure shortfall. (DOD) The specified movement requirement or portion thereof that did not meet scheduling criteria and/or movement dates. (JP 1-02)

coalition. (DOD) An ad hoc arrangement between two or more nations for common action. See also alliance. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

coalition force. (DOD) A force composed of military elements of nations that have formed a temporary alliance for some specific purpose. (JP 1-02)

combat forces. (DOD) Those forces whose primary missions are to participate in combat. (JP 1-02)

combat service support. (DOD) The essential capabilities, functions, activities, and tasks necessary to sustain all elements of operating forces in theater at all levels of war. Within the national and theater logistic systems, it includes but is not limited to that support rendered by service forces in ensuring the aspects of supply, maintenance, transportation, health services, and other services required by aviation and ground combat troops to permit those units to accomplish their missions in combat. Combat service support encompasses those activities at all levels of war that produce sustainment to all operating forces on the battlefield. (JP 1-02)

combat support. (DOD, NATO) Fire support and operational assistance provided to combat elements. (Approved by JMTGM# 046-95)

combatant command. (DOD) A unified or specified command with a broad continuing mission under a single commander established and so designated by the President, through the Secretary of Defense and with the advice and assistance of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Combatant commands typically have geographic or functional responsibilities. See also specified command; unified command. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

combatant command (command authority). (DOD) Nontransferable command authority established by title 10 ("Armed Forces"), United States Code, section 164, exercised only by commanders of unified or specified combatant commands unless otherwise directed by the President or the Secretary of Defense. Combatant command (command authority) cannot be delegated and is the authority of a combatant commander to perform those functions of command over assigned forces involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and giving authoritative direction over all aspects of military operations, joint training, and logistics necessary to accomplish the missions assigned to the command. Combatant command (command authority) should be exercised through the commanders of subordinate organizations. Normally this authority is exercised through subordinate joint force commanders and Service and/or functional component commanders. Combatant command (command authority) provides full authority to organize and employ commands and forces as the combatant commander considers necessary to accomplish assigned missions. Operational control is inherent in combatant command (command authority). Also called COCOM. See also combatant command; combatant commander; operational control. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

combatant commander. (DOD) A commander in chief of one of the unified or specified combatant commands established by the President. See also combatant command. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

combined. (DOD, NATO) Between two or more forces or agencies of two or more allies. (When all allies or services are not involved, the participating nations and services shall be identified, e.g., Combined Navies.) See also joint. (JP 1-02)

command and control. (DOD) The exercise of authority and direction by a properly designated commander over assigned and attached forces in the accomplishment of the mission. Command and control functions are performed through an arrangement of personnel, equipment, communications, facilities, and procedures employed by a commander in planning, directing, coordinating, and controlling forces and operations in the accomplishment of the mission. Also called C2. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

command and control system. (DOD) The facilities, equipment, communications, procedures, and personnel essential to a commander for planning, directing, and controlling operations of assigned forces pursuant to the missions assigned. (JP 1-02)

command and control warfare. (DOD) The integrated use of operations security, military deception, psychological operations, electronic warfare, and physical destruction, mutually supported by intelligence, to deny information to, influence, degrade, or destroy adversary command and control capabilities, while protecting friendly command and control capabilities against such actions. Command and control warfare is an application of information warfare in military operations and is a subset of information warfare. Command and control warfare applies across the range of military operations and all levels of conflict. Also called C2W. C2W is both offensive and defensive: a. C2-attack. Prevent effective C2 of adversary forces by denying information to, influencing, degrading, or destroying the adversary C2 system. b. C2-protect. Maintain effective command and control of own forces by turning to friendly advantage or negating adversary efforts to deny information to, influence, degrade, or destroy the friendly C2 system. See also command and control; electronic warfare; military deception; operations security; psychological operations. (Approved by JMTGM# 034-96)

command, control, communications, and computer systems. (DOD) Integrated systems of doctrine, procedures, organizational structures, personnel, equipment, facilities, and communications designed to support a commanderís exercise of command and control across the range of military operations. Also called C4 systems. See also command and control; tactical command, control, communications, and computer system(s). (Approved by JMTGM# 081-95)

commanderís estimate of the situation. (DOD) A logical process of reasoning by which a commander considers all the circumstances affecting the military situation and arrives at a decision as to a course of action to be taken to accomplish the mission. A commanderís estimate which considers a military situation so far in the future as to require major assumptions is called a commanderís long-range estimate of the situation. (JP 1-02)

common servicing. (DOD) That function performed by one Military Service in support of another Military Service for which reimbursement is not required from the Service receiving support. (JP 1-02)

common supplies. (DOD) Those supplies common to two or more Services. (JP 1-02)

common-user lift. (DOD) US Transportation Command-controlled lift: The pool of strategic transportation assets either government owned or chartered that are under the operational control of Air Mobility Command, Military Sealift Command, or Military Traffic Management Command for the purpose of providing common-user transportation to the Department of Defense across the range of military operations. These assets range from common-user organic or chartered pool of common-user assets available day-to-day to a larger pool of common-user assets phased in from other sources. (JP 1-02)

communications zone. (DOD, NATO) Rear part of theater of operations (behind but contiguous to the combat zone) which contains the lines of communications, establishments for supply and evacuation, and other agencies required for the immediate support and maintenance of the field forces. (JP 1-02)

completeness. (DOD) Operation plan review criterion. The determination that each course of action must be complete and answer the questions: who, what, when, where, and how. See also acceptability; completeness; feasibility; suitability. (JP 1-02)

component. (DOD) 1. One of the subordinate organizations that constitute a joint force. Normally a joint force is organized with a combination of Service and functional components. 2. In logistics, a part or combination of parts having a specific function, which can be installed or replaced only as an entity. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

concept of logistic support. (DOD) A verbal or graphic statement, in broad outline, of how a commander intends to support and integrate with a concept of operations in an operation or campaign. (JP 1-02)

concept of operations. (DOD) A verbal or graphic statement, in broad outline, of a commanderís assumptions or intent in regard to an operation or series of operations. The concept of operations frequently is embodied in campaign plans and operation plans; in the latter case, particularly when the plans cover a series of connected operations to be carried out simultaneously or in succession. The concept is designed to give an overall picture of the operation. It is included primarily for additional clarity of purpose. Also called commanderís concept. (JP 1-02)

contingency. (DOD) An emergency involving military forces caused by natural disasters, terrorists, subversives, or by required military operations. Due to the uncertainty of the situation, contingencies require plans, rapid response, and special procedures to ensure the safety and readiness of personnel, installations, and equipment. See also contingency planning. (JP 1-02)

contingency plan. (DOD) A plan for major contingencies that can reasonably be anticipated in the principal geographic subareas of the command. See also joint operation planning. (Approved by JMTGM# 006-95)

contingency planning. The development of plans for potential crises involving military requirements that can reasonably be expected in an area of responsibility. Contingency planning can occur anywhere within the operational continuum from peace to conflict and war and may be performed deliberately or under crisis action conditions. Contingency planning for joint operations is coordinated at the national level by assigning planning tasks and relationships among the combatant commanders and apportioning or allocating to them the forces and resources available to accomplish those tasks. Commanders throughout the unified chain of command may give their staffs and subordinate commands additional contingency planning tasks beyond those specified at the national level to ensure broader contingency coverage. (Approved for inclusion in the next edition of Joint Pub 1-02)

conventional planning and execution. (DOD) Worldwide Military Command and Control System command and control application software and databases that are designed to support requirements relating to joint planning mobilization and deployment, including plan development, course of action development, execution planning, execution, movement monitoring, sustainment, and redeployment from origin to destination. (JP 1-02)

coordinating authority. (DOD) A commander or individual assigned responsibility for coordinating specific functions or activities involving forces of two or more Military Departments or two or more forces of the same Service. The commander or individual has the authority to require consultation between the agencies involved, but does not have the authority to compel agreement. In the event that essential agreement cannot be obtained, the matter shall be referred to the appointing authority. Coordinating authority is a consultation relationship, not an authority through which command may be exercised. Coordinating authority is more applicable to planning and similar activities than to operations. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

course of action. (DOD) 1. A plan that would accomplish, or is related to, the accomplishment of a mission. 2. The scheme adopted to accomplish a task or mission. It is a product of the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System concept development phase. The supported commander will include a recommended course of action in the commanderís estimate. The recommended course of action will include the concept of operations, evaluation of supportability estimates of supporting organizations, and an integrated time-phased data base of combat, combat support, and combat service support forces and sustainment. Refinement of this data base will be contingent on the time available for course of action development. When approved, the course of action becomes the basis for the development of an operation plan or operation order. Also called COA. (JP 1-02)

course of action development. (DOD) The phase of the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System within the crisis action planning process that provides for the development of military responses and includes, within the limits of the time allowed: establishing force and sustainment requirements with actual units; evaluating force, logistic, and transportation feasibility; identifying and resolving resource shortfalls; recommending resource allocations; and producing a course of action via a commanderís estimate that contains a concept of operations, employment concept, risk assessments, prioritized courses of action, and supporting data bases. See also course of action; crisis action planning. (JP 1-02)

crisis. (DOD) An incident or situation involving a threat to the United States, its territories, citizens, military forces, possessions, or vital interests that develops rapidly and creates a condition of such diplomatic, economic, political, or military importance that commitment of US military forces and resources is contemplated to achieve national objectives. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

crisis action planning. (DOD) 1. The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System process involving the time-sensitive development of joint operation plans and orders in response to an imminent crisis. Crisis action planning follows prescribed crisis action procedures to formulate and implement an effective response within the time frame permitted by the crisis. 2. The time-sensitive planning for the deployment, employment, and sustainment of assigned and allocated forces and resources that occurs in response to a situation that may result in actual military operations. Crisis action planners base their plan on the circumstances that exist at the time planning occurs. Also called CAP. See also Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

critical item. (DOD) An essential item which is in short supply or expected to be in short supply for an extended period. (JP 1-02)

critical item list. (DOD) Prioritized list, compiled from commandersí composite critical item lists, identifying items and weapon systems that assist Services and Defense Logistics Agency in selecting systems for production surge planning. (JP 1-02)

critical sustainability items. (DOD) Items described at National Stock Number level of detail, by Federal Supply Class, as part of the Logistic Factors File, that significantly affect the commanderís ability to execute an operation plan. (JP 1-02)

cross-servicing. (DOD) That function performed by one Military Service in support of another Military Service for which reimbursement is required from the Service receiving support. (JP 1-02)

debarkation. (DOD) The unloading of troops, equipment, or supplies from a ship or aircraft. (JP 1-02)

deception means. (DOD) Methods, resources, and techniques that can be used to convey information to the deception target. There are three categories of deception means: a. physical means--Activities and resources used to convey or deny selected information to a foreign power. (Examples: military operations, including exercises, reconnaissance, training activities, and movement of forces; the use of dummy equipment and devices; tactics; bases, logistic actions, stockpiles, and repair activity; and test and evaluation activities.) b. technical means--Military material resources and their associated operating techniques used to convey or deny selected information to a foreign power through the deliberate radiation, reradiation, alteration, absorption, or reflection of energy; the emission or suppression of chemical or biological odors; and the emission or suppression of nuclear particles. c. administrative means--Resources, methods, and techniques to convey or deny oral, pictorial, documentary, or other physical evidence to a foreign power. (Approved by JMTGM# 055-2840-94)

decision. (DOD) In an estimate of the situation, a clear and concise statement of the line of action intended to be followed by the commander as the one most favorable to the successful accomplishment of the mission. (JP 1-02)

Defense Planning Guidance. (DOD) This document, issued by the Secretary of Defense, provides firm guidance in the form of goals, priorities, and objectives, including fiscal constraints, for the development of the Program Objective Memorandums by the Military Departments and Defense agencies. Also called DPG. (JP 1-02)

defense readiness conditions. (DOD) A uniform system of progressive alert postures for use between the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the commanders of unified and specified commands and for use by the Services. Defense readiness conditions are graduated to match situations of varying military severity (status of alert). Defense readiness conditions are identified by the short title DEFCON (5), (4), (3), (2), and (1), as appropriate. Also called DEFCON. (JP 1-02)

deliberate planning. (DOD) 1. The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System process involving the development of joint operation plans for contingencies identified in joint strategic planning documents. Conducted principally in peacetime, deliberate planning is accomplished in prescribed cycles that complement other Department of Defense planning cycles in accordance with the formally established Joint Strategic Planning System. 2. A planning process for the deployment and employment of apportioned forces and resources that occurs in response to a hypothetical situation. Deliberate planners rely heavily on assumptions regarding the circumstances that will exist when the plan is executed. See also Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. (Approved by

JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

demonstration. (DOD, NATO) 1. An attack or show of force on a front where a decision is not sought, made with the aim of deceiving the enemy. (DOD) 2. In military deception, a show of force in an area where a decision is not sought made to deceive an adversary. It is similar to a feint but no actual contact with the adversary is intended. (Approved by JMTGM# 055-2840-94)

deploy decisive force. To take actions including the rapid deployment of sufficient and supportable warfighting force to a crisis region in order to defend U.S. interests, followed by sufficient additional force to end the conflict quickly and on terms favorable to the United States.

deployability posture. (DOD) The state or stage of a unitís preparedness for deployment to participate in a military operation, defined in five levels as follows: a. normal deployability posture. The unit is conducting normal activities. Commanders are monitoring the situation in any area of tension and reviewing plans. No visible overt actions are being taken to increase deployability posture. Units not at home station report their scheduled closure time at home station or the time required to return to home station if ordered to return before scheduled time and desired mode of transportation are available. b. increased deployability posture. The unit is relieved from commitments not pertaining to the mission. Personnel are recalled from training areas, pass, and leave, as required, to meet the deployment schedule. Preparation for deployment of equipment and supplies is initiated. Pre-deployment personnel actions are completed. Essential equipment and supplies located at continental United States (CONUS) or overseas installations are identified. c. advanced deployability posture. All essential personnel, mobility equipment, and accompanying supplies are checked, packed, rigged for deployment, and positioned with deploying unit. The unit remains at home station. Movement requirements are confirmed. Airlift, sealift, and intra-CONUS transportation resources are identified, and initial movement schedules are completed by the Transportation Component Commands. d. marshaled deployability posture. The first increment of deploying personnel, mobility equipment, and accompanying supplies is marshaled at designated ports of embarkation but not loaded. Sufficient aircraft or sealift assets are positioned at, or en route to, the port of embarkation, either to load the first increment or to sustain a flow, as required by the plan or directive being considered for execution. Supporting airlift control elements (ALCEs), stage crews (if required), and support personnel adequate to sustain the airlift flow at onload, en route, and offload locations will be positioned, as required. e. Loaded deployability posture. All first increment equipment and accompanying supplies are loaded aboard ships and prepared for departure to the designated objective area. Personnel are prepared for loading on minimum notice. Follow-on increments of cargo and personnel are en route or available to meet projected ship loading schedules. Sufficient airlift is positioned and loaded at the port of embarkation to move the first increment or to initiate and sustain a flow, as required by the plan or directive being considered for execution. Supporting ALCEs, stage aircrews (if required), and support personnel adequate to sustain the airlift flow at onload, en route, and offload locations are positioned, as required. (JP 1-02)

deployment. (DOD) 1. In naval usage, the change from a cruising approach or contact disposition to a disposition for battle. 2. The movement of forces within areas of operation. 3. The positioning of forces into a formation for battle. 4. The relocation of forces and materiel to desired areas of operations. Deployment encompasses all activities from origin or home station through destination, specifically including intra-continental United States, intertheater, and intratheater movement legs, staging, and holding areas. See also deployment order; deployment planning; deployment preparation order. (JP 1-02)

deployment data base. (DOD) The JOPES (Joint Operation Planning and Execution System) data base containing the necessary information on forces, materiel, and filler and replacement personnel movement requirements to support execution. The data base reflects information contained in the refined time-phased force and deployment data from the deliberate planning process or developed during the various phases of the crisis action planning process, and the movement schedules or tables developed by the transportation component commands to support the deployment of required forces, personnel, and materiel. See also time-phased force and deployment data. (JP 1-02)

deployment estimate. The estimated time required for all ULNs, CINs, and PINs of a TPFDD to arrive at the PODs expressed in C-days, from the time of notification to deploy.

deployment order. (DOD) A planning directive from the Secretary of Defense, issued by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, that authorizes and directs the transfer of forces between combatant commands by reassignment or attachment. A deployment order normally specifies the authority that the gaining combatant commander will exercise over the transferred forces. See also deployment; deployment planning; deployment preparation order. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

deployment planning. (DOD) Operational planning directed toward the movement of forces and sustainment resources from their original locations to a specific operational area for conducting the joint operations contemplated in a given plan. Encompasses all activities from origin or home station through destination, specifically including intra-continental United States, intertheater, and intratheater movement legs, staging areas, and holding areas. See also deployment; deployment order; deployment preparation order. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

deployment preparation order. (DOD) An order issued by competent authority to move forces or prepare forces for movement (e.g., increase deployability posture of units). See also deployment; deployment planning; deployment preparation order. (JP 1-02)

destination (DEST). The terminal geographic location in the routing scheme for forces only. (Resupply and replacement personnel are routed to a port of support.) The destination identifies the station or location in the objective area where the unit will be employed. For some units, the destination may be the same as their POD. (JOPES Userís Manual)

deterrent options. (DOD) A course of action, developed on the best economic, diplomatic, political, and military judgment, designed to dissuade an adversary from a current course of action or contemplated operations. (In constructing an operation plan, a range of options should be presented to effect deterrence. Each option requiring deployment of forces should be a separate force module.) (JP 1-02)

directive authority for logistics. A CINCís authority to issue directives, including peacetime measures, to subordinate commanders necessary to ensure effective execution of operations, economy of operation, and prevention of unnecessary duplication by the component commands. (Joint Pub 4-0)

doctrine. (DOD) Fundamental principles by which the military forces or elements thereof guide their actions in support of national objectives. It is authoritative but requires judgment in application. (JP 1-02)

dynamic analysis and replanning tool. An ADP application program designed to furnish a grossly transportation-feasible TPFDD for a COA or operation plan. It allows planners to build, edit, and manipulate TPFDD files. DART also offers capabilities to analyze proposed COAs in relation to asset allocation profiles and TPFDD files.

earliest arrival date. (DOD) A day, relative to C-day, that is specified by a planner as the earliest date when a unit, a resupply shipment, or replacement personnel can be accepted at a port of debarkation during a deployment. Used with the latest arrival date, it defines a delivery window for transportation planning. Also called EAD. See also latest arrival date. (JP 1-02)

electronic warfare. (DOD) Any military action involving the use of electromagnetic and directed energy to control the electromagnetic spectrum or to attack the enemy. Also called EW. The three major subdivisions within electronic warfare are: electronic attack, electronic protection, and electronic warfare support. a. electronic attack. That division of electronic warfare involving the use of electromagnetic, directed energy, or antiradiation weapons to attack personnel, facilities, or equipment with the intent of degrading, neutralizing, or destroying enemy combat capability. Also called EA. EA includes: 1) actions taken to prevent or reduce an enemyís effective use of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as jamming and electromagnetic deception, and 2) employment of weapons that use either electromagnetic or directed energy as their primary destructive mechanism (lasers, radio frequency weapons, particle beams). b. electronic protection. That division of electronic warfare involving actions taken to protect personnel, facilities, and equipment from any effects of friendly or enemy employment of electronic warfare that degrade, neutralize, or destroy friendly combat capability. Also called EP. c. electronic warfare support. That division of electronic warfare involving actions tasked by, or under direct control of, an operational commander to search for, intercept, identify, and locate sources of intentional and unintentional radiated electromagnetic energy for the purpose of immediate threat recognition. Thus, electronic warfare support provides information required for immediate decisions involving electronic warfare operations and other tactical actions such as threat avoidance, targeting, and homing. Also called ES. Electronic warfare support data can be used to produce signals intelligence, both communications intelligence, and electronics intelligence. See also command and control warfare. (Approved by JMTGM# 034-96)

embarkation. (DOD, NATO) The process of putting personnel and/or vehicles and their associated stores and equipment into ships and/or aircraft. (JP 1-02)

employment. (DOD) The strategic, operational, or tactical use of forces. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

enemy capabilities. (DOD) Those courses of action of which the enemy is physically capable, and that, if adopted, will affect accomplishment of our mission. The term "capabilities" includes not only the general courses of action open to the enemy, such as attack, defense, or withdrawal, but also all the particular courses of action possible under each general course of action. "Enemy capabilities" are considered in the light of all known factors affecting military operations, including time, space, weather, terrain, and the strength and disposition of enemy forces. In strategic thinking, the capabilities of a nation represent the courses of action within the power of the nation for accomplishing its national objectives throughout the range of military operations. (JP 1-02)

essential elements of friendly information. (DOD) Key questions likely to be asked by adversary officials and intelligence systems about specific friendly intentions, capabilities, and activities, so they can obtain answers critical to their operational effectiveness. Also called EEFI. (JP 1-02)

evacuation policy. (DOD) 1. Command decision indicating the length in days of the maximum period of noneffectiveness that patients may be held within the command for treatment. Patients who, in the opinion of responsible medical officers, cannot be returned to duty status within the period prescribed are evacuated by the first available means, provided the travel involved will not aggravate their disabilities. 2. A command decision concerning the movement of civilians from the proximity of military operations for security and safety reasons and involving the need to arrange for movement, reception, care, and control of such individuals. 3. Command policy concerning the evacuation of unserviceable or abandoned materiel and including designation of channels and destinations for evacuated materiel, the establishment of controls and procedures, and the dissemination of condition standards and disposition instructions. (JP 1-02)

execute order. (DOD) 1. An order issued by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, by the authority and at the direction of the Secretary of Defense, to implement a National Command Authorities decision to initiate military operations. 2. An order to initiate military operations as directed. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

execution planning. (DOD) The phase of the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System crisis action planning process that provides for the translation of an approved course of action into an executable plan of action through the preparation of a complete operation plan or operation order. Execution planning is detailed planning for the commitment of specified forces and resources. During crisis action planning, an approved operation plan or other National Command Authorities-approved course of action is adjusted, refined, and translated into an operation order. Execution planning can proceed on the basis of prior deliberate planning, or it can take place in the absence of prior planning. See also Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

feasibility. (DOD) Operation plan review criterion. The determination of whether the assigned tasks could be accomplished by using available resources. See also acceptability; adequacy; completeness; suitability. (JP 1-02)

file. A collection of one or more types of related computer records for some overall topic. (JOPES Userís Manual)

filler personnel. (DOD) Individuals of suitable grade and skill initially required to bring a unit or organization to its authorized strength. (JP 1-02)

flexible deterrent options. A planning framework intended to facilitate early decision by laying out a wide range of interrelated response paths that begin with deterrent-oriented options carefully tailored to send the right signal. These options should include limited (primarily active brigade, squadron, group) military forces and preplanned requests for economic, diplomatic, and political actions appropriate to particular military actions.

force augmentation planning and execution system. An ADP application program designed to improve the ability of the Joint Staff to plan and monitor mobilization of an effective fighting force; determine and satisfy information requirements for augmentation forces by employment, deployment, and sustainment planning; analyze mobilization feasibility to determine shortfalls in personnel required; and support the integrated planning, monitoring, and execution of manpower mobilization.

force closure. (DOD) The point in time when a supported commander determines that sufficient personnel and equipment resources are in the assigned area of operations to carry out assigned tasks. (JP 1-02)

force entry operations. The aggregation of military personnel, weapon systems, vehicles, and necessary support, or combinations thereof, embarked for the purpose of gaining access through land, air, or amphibious operations to an objective area. Force entry into an objective area may be opposed or unopposed. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

force list. (DOD) A total list of forces required by an operation plan, including assigned forces, augmentation forces, and other forces to be employed in support of the plan.

(JP 1-02)

force module. (DOD) A grouping of combat, combat support, and combat service support forces, with their accompanying supplies and the required nonunit resupply and personnel necessary to sustain forces for a minimum of 30 days. The elements of force modules are linked together or are uniquely identified so that they may be extracted from or adjusted as an entity in the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System data bases to enhance flexibility and usefulness of the operation plan during a crisis. Also called FM. See also force module package. (JP 1-02)

force module package. (DOD) A force module with a specific functional orientation (e.g. air superiority, close air support, reconnaissance, ground defense) that includes combat, associated combat support, and combat service support forces. Additionally, force module packages will contain sustainment in accordance with logistic policy contained in Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan Annex B. Also called FMP. See also force module.

(JP 1-02)

force record. A description of a TPFDD unit composed of three parts:

(1) force requirement routing data composed of force description information, such as FRN, UTC, unit level code (ULC), personnel strength, ILOC, POD, DEST, load configuration, movement dates, and preferred mode and source of transportation

(2) force unit identification incorporating UIC, unit name, ORIGIN, RLD, POE, ALD, and preferred transportation mode

(3) force movement characteristics, including passengers and cargo of a type unit defined by TUCHA file data for that standard UTC. It is part of the ULN. (adapted from Joint Pub 1-03.16)

force requirement number. (DOD) An alphanumeric code used to uniquely identify force entries in a given operation plan time-phased force and deployment data. Also called FRN. (JP 1-02)

force sourcing. (DOD) The identification of the actual units, their origins, ports of embarkation, and movement characteristics to satisfy the time-phased force requirements of a supported commander. (JP 1-02)

forcible entry. Seizing and holding a military lodgment in the face of armed opposition. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

foreign internal defense. (DOD) Participation by civilian and military agencies of a government in any of the action programs taken by another government to free and protect its society from subversion, lawlessness, and insurgency. Also called FID. (JP 1-02)

fragmentary order. (DOD) An abbreviated form of an operation order, usually issued on a day-to-day basis, that eliminates the need for restating information contained in a basic operation order. It may be issued in sections. (JP 1-02)

fragmentation code. The sixth position of the ULN, used to identify elements of a force deploying in more than one increment. (JOPES Userís Manual)

functional plans. (DOD) Plans involving the conduct of military operations in a peacetime or permissive environment developed by combatant commanders to address requirements such as disaster relief, nation assistance, logistics, communications, surveillance, protection of US citizens, nuclear weapon recovery and evacuation, and continuity of operations, or similar discrete tasks. They may be developed in response to the requirements of the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan, at the initiative of the CINC, or as tasked by the supported combatant commander, Joint Staff, Service, or Defense agency. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff review of CINC-initiated plans is not normally required. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

future-year defense program. The forces and resources associated with programs approved by the Secretary of Defense for the Department of Defense; residing in an automated database, it is updated and published at least three times each budget cycle. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

grossly transportation feasible. (DOD) A determination made by the supported commander that a draft operation plan can be supported with the apportioned transportation assets. This determination is made by using a transportation feasibility estimator to simulate movement of personnel and cargo from port of embarkation to port of debarkation within a specified time frame. (JP 1-02)

host-nation support. (DOD) Civil and/or military assistance rendered by a nation to foreign forces within its territory during peacetime, crises or emergencies, or war based on agreements mutually concluded between nations. (Approved by JMTGM# 081-95)

implementation. (DOD) Procedures governing the mobilization of the force and the deployment, employment, and sustainment of military operations in response to execution orders issued by the National Command Authorities. (JP 1-02)

implementation planning. (DOD) Operational planning associated with the conduct of a continuing operation, campaign, or war to attain defined objectives. At the national level, it includes the development of strategy and the assignment of strategic tasks to the combatant commanders. At the theater level, it includes the development of campaign plans to attain assigned objectives and the preparation of operation plans and operation orders to prosecute the campaign. At lower levels, implementation planning prepares for the execution of assigned tasks or logistic missions. See also joint operation planning.

(JP 1-02)

in-place force. (DOD) 1. A NATO assigned force which, in peacetime, is principally stationed in the designated combat zone of the NATO command to which it is committed. 2. Force within a combatant commanderís area of responsibility and under the combatant commanderís combatant command (command authority). (JP 1-02)

integrated priority list. (DOD) A list of a combatant commanderís highest priority requirements, prioritized across Service and functional lines, defining shortfalls in key programs that, in the judgment of the combatant commander, adversely affect the capability of the combatant commanderís forces to accomplish their assigned mission. The integrated priority list provides the combatant commanderís recommendations for programming funds in the Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System process. Also called IPL. (JP 1-02)

intelligence estimate. (DOD, NATO) The appraisal, expressed in writing or orally, of available intelligence relating to a specific situation or condition with a view to determining the courses of action open to the enemy or potential enemy and the order of probability of their adoption. (JP 1-02)

intermediate location. An intermediate stopping point in the deployment routing of a unit, used to lay over the force for a specified time, normally longer than one day. It is often used to unite the personnel and cargo of split shipments. This point may occur between the ORIGIN and POE, the POE and POD, or the POD and DEST. (JOPES Userís Manual)

international logistics. (DOD) The negotiating, planning, and implementation of supporting logistics arrangements between nations, their forces, and agencies. It includes furnishing logistic support (major end items, materiel, and/or services) to, or receiving logistic support from, one or more friendly foreign governments, international organizations, or military forces, with or without reimbursement. It also includes planning and actions related to the intermeshing of a significant element, activity, or component of the military logistics systems or procedures of the United States with those of one or more foreign governments, international organizations, or military forces on a temporary or permanent basis. It includes planning and actions related to the utilization of United States logistics policies, systems, and/or procedures to meet requirements of one or more foreign governments, international organizations, or forces. (JP 1-02)

international logistic support. (DOD) The provision of military logistic support by one participating nation to one or more participating nations, either with or without reimbursement. See also inter-Service support. (JP 1-02)

interoperability. (DOD, NATO) 1. The ability of systems, units or forces to provide services to and accept services from other systems, units, or forces and to use the services so exchanged to enable them to operate effectively together. (DOD) 2. The condition achieved among communications-electronics systems or items of communications-electronics equipment when information or services can be exchanged directly and satisfactorily between them and/or their users. The degree of interoperability should be defined when referring to specific cases. (JP 1-02)

inter-Service support. (DOD) Action by one Military Service or element thereof to provide logistic and/or administrative support to another Military Service or element thereof. Such action can be recurring or nonrecurring in character on an installation, area, or worldwide basis. See also international logistic support. (JP 1-02)

intertheater. (DOD) Between theaters or between the continental United States and theaters. (JP 1-02)

intratheater. (DOD) Within a theater. (JP 1-02)

issue books. The collection of major issues resulting from OSD staff review of Program Objective Memorandums. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

joint. (DOD) Connotes activities, operations, organizations, etc., in which elements of two or more Military Departments participate. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

joint flow and analysis system for transportation. Application software designed to furnish a quick-response capability to determine the transportation feasibility of a concept. JFAST accesses the TPFDD to perform closure estimates, determine optimum mode, assess the effects of attrition, identify shortfalls in movement capability versus required capability, and determine gross lift capability. JFAST replaces the TFE.

joint force. (DOD) A general term applied to a force composed of significant elements, assigned or attached, of two or more Military Departments, operating under a single joint force commander. See also joint force commander. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

joint force air component commander. (DOD) The joint force air component commander derives authority from the joint force commander who has the authority to exercise operational control, assign missions, direct coordination among subordinate commanders, redirect and organize forces to ensure unity of effort in the accomplishment of the overall mission. The joint force commander will normally designate a joint force air component commander. The joint force air component commanderís responsibilities will be assigned by the joint force commander (normally these would include, but not be limited to, planning, coordination, allocation, and tasking based on the joint force commanderís apportionment decision). Using the joint force commanderís guidance and authority, and in coordination with other Service component commanders and other assigned or supporting commanders, the joint force air component commander will recommend to the joint force commander apportionment of air sorties to various missions or geographic areas. Also called JFACC. See also joint force commander. (JP 1-02)

joint force commander. (DOD) A general term applied to a combatant commander, subunified commander, or joint task force commander authorized to exercise combatant command (command authority) or operational control over a joint force. Also called JFC. See also joint force. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

joint force land component commander. (DOD) The commander within a unified command, subordinate unified command, or joint task force responsible to the establishing commander for making recommendations on the proper employment of land forces, planning and coordinating land operations, or accomplishing such operational missions as may be assigned. The joint force land component commander is given the authority necessary to accomplish missions and tasks assigned by the establishing commander. The joint force land component commander will normally be the commander with the preponderance of land forces and the requisite command and control capabilities. Also called JFLCC. (JP 1-02)

joint force maritime component commander. (DOD) The commander within a unified command, subordinate unified command, or joint task force responsible to the establishing commander for making recommendations on the proper employment of maritime forces and assets, planning and coordinating maritime operations, or accomplishing such operational missions as may be assigned. The joint force maritime component commander is given the authority necessary to accomplish missions and tasks assigned by the establishing commander. The joint force maritime component commander will normally be the commander with the preponderance of maritime forces and the requisite command and control capabilities. Also called JFMCC. (JP 1-02)

joint force special operations component commander. (DOD) The commander within a unified command, subordinate unified command, or joint task force responsible to the establishing commander for making recommendations on the proper employment of special operations forces and assets, planning and coordinating special operations, or accomplishing such operational missions as may be assigned. The joint force special operations component commander is given the authority necessary to accomplish missions and tasks assigned by the establishing commander. The joint force special operations component commander will normally be the commander with the preponderance of special operations forces and the requisite command and control capabilities. Also called JFSOCC. (JP 1-02)

joint logistics. (DOD) The art and science of planning and carrying out, by a joint force commander and staff, logistic operations to support the protection, movement, maneuver, firepower, and sustainment of operating forces of two or more Services of the same nation. (JP 1-02)

joint matters. (DOD) Matters relating to the integrated employment of land, sea, and air forces, including matters relating to national military strategy, strategic and contingency planning, and command and control of combat operations under a unified command.

(JP 1-02)

joint movement center. (DOD) The center established to coordinate the employment of all means of transportation (including that provided by allies or host nations) to support the concept of operations. This coordination is accomplished through establishment of transportation policies within the assigned area of responsibility, consistent with relative urgency of need, port and terminal capabilities, transportation asset availability, and priorities set by a joint force commander. (JP 1-02)

joint operations. (DOD) A general term to describe military actions conducted by joint forces, or by Service forces in relationships (e.g., support, coordinating authority), which, of themselves, do not create joint forces. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

joint operation planning. (DOD) Planning for contingencies which can reasonably be anticipated in an area of responsibility or joint operations area of the command. Planning activities exclusively associated with the preparation of operation plans, operation plans in concept format, campaign plans, and operation orders (other than the single integrated operation plan) for the conduct of military operations by the combatant commanders in response to requirements established by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Joint operation planning is coordinated at the national level to support Secretary of Defense Contingency Planning Guidance, strategic requirements in the National Military Strategy, and emerging crises. As such, joint operation planning includes mobilization planning, deployment planning, employment planning, sustainment planning, and redeployment planning procedures. Joint operation planning is performed in accordance with formally established planning and execution procedures. See also contingency plan; execution planning; implementation planning; Joint Operation Planning and Execution System; joint operation planning process. (Approved by JMTGM# 081-95)

Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. (DOD) A continuously evolving system that is being developed through the integration and enhancement of earlier planning and execution systems: Joint Operation Planning System and Joint Deployment System. It provides the foundation for conventional command and control by national- and theater-level commanders and their staffs. It is designed to satisfy their information needs in the conduct of joint planning and operations. Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES) includes joint operation planning policies, procedures, and reporting structures supported by communications and automated data processing systems. JOPES is used to monitor, plan, and execute mobilization, deployment, employment, and sustainment activities associated with joint operations. Also called JOPES. See also joint operation planning. (JP 1-02)

joint operation planning process. (DOD) A coordinated Joint Staff procedure used by a commander to determine the best method of accomplishing assigned tasks and to direct the action necessary to accomplish the mission. See also joint operation planning; Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. (Approved by JMTGM# 081-95)

joint planning document. Formerly annexes of the National Military Strategy (NMS), this document supports the NMS by furnishing concise programming priorities, requirements, or advice to the Secretary of Defense for consideration during preparation of the DEFENSE PLANNING GUIDANCE (DPG). The JPD is a stand-alone document published in a series of volumes dealing with specific areas. It is intended to furnish insight into the Chairmanís priorities in development of the defense program for the affected FYDP. (adapted from CJCS MOP 7, 1st Revision, 17 March 1993)

joint planning and execution community. (DOD) Those headquarters, commands, and agencies involved in the training, preparation, movement, reception, employment, support, and sustainment of military forces assigned or committed to a theater of operations or objective area. It usually consists of the Joint Staff, Services, Service major commands (including the Service wholesale logistics commands), unified commands (and their certain Service component commands), subunified commands, transportation component commands, joint task forces (as applicable), Defense Logistics Agency, and other Defense agencies (e.g., Defense Intelligence Agency) as may be appropriate to a given scenario. Also called JPEC. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

joint servicing. That function performed by a jointly staffed and financed activity in support of two or more military Services. (JP 1-02)

joint special operations task force. A joint task force composed of special operations units from more than one Service, formed to carry out a specific special operation or prosecute special operations in support of a theater campaign or other operations. The joint special operations task force may have conventional nonspecial operations units assigned or attached to support the conduct of specific missions. (JP 1-02)

joint staff. 1. The staff of a commander of a unified or specified command, or of a joint task force, which includes members from the several Services comprising the force. These members should be assigned in such a manner as to ensure that the commander understands the tactics, techniques, capabilities, needs, and limitations of the component parts of the force. Positions on the staff should be divided so that Service representation and influence generally reflect the Service composition of the force. 2. Joint Staff. The staff under the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as provided for in the National Security Act of 1947, as amended by the DOD Reorganization Act of 1986. The Joint Staff assists the Chairman, and, subject to the authority, direction, and control of the Chairman, the other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Vice Chairman in carrying out their responsibilities. (JP 1-02)

joint strategic planning system. The primary means by which the Chairman, in consultation with the other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the CINCs, carries out his statutory responsibilities to assist the President and Secretary of Defense in giving strategic direction to the Armed Forces; prepares strategic plans; prepares and reviews contingency plans; advises the President and Secretary of Defense on requirements, programs, and budgets; and gives net assessment on the capabilities of the Armed Forces of the United States and its allies as compared with those of their potential adversaries. Also called JSPS. (JP 1-02)

joint tactics, techniques, and procedures. The actions and methods which implement joint doctrine and describe how forces will be employed in joint operations. They will be published by CJCS, in coordination with the combatant commands, Services, and Joint Staff. (JP 1-02)

joint task force. (DOD) A joint force that is constituted and so designated by the Secretary of Defense, a combatant commander, a subunified commander, or an existing joint task force commander. Also called JTF. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

JOPES ADP. The Global Command and Control System (GCCS) standard computer-based system consisting of standard data files, standard ADP programs, and instructions for the reporting and exchange of data used to develop, analyze, refine, review, and maintain joint operation plans. It is supported by an integrated set of functional application software residing on the WWMCCS Information System (WIS) Workstation (WWS) coupled with a more advanced user interface to other applications. See also Technology Insertion Project (TIP). Access to these applications is through a client/server environment.

latest arrival date. (DOD) A day, relative to C-day, that is specified by a planner as the latest date when a unit, a resupply shipment, or replacement personnel can arrive and complete unloading at the port of debarkation and support the concept of operations. Also called LAD. See also earliest arrival date. (JP 1-02)

lesser regional contingency. A regionally centered crisis based on a less compelling threat than those involved in an MRC. Missions range from conflict to the lower end of the combat spectrum.

level of detail. (DOD) Within the current joint planning and execution systems, movement characteristics are described at five distinct levels of detail. These levels are: a. level I. aggregated level. Expressed as total number of passengers and total short tons, total measurement tons, total square feet and/or total hundreds of barrels by unit line number (ULN), cargo increment number (CIN), and personnel increment number (PIN). b. level II. summary level. Expressed as total number of passengers by ULN and PIN and short tons, measurement tons (including barrels), total square feet of bulk, oversize, outsize, and non-air-transportable cargo by ULN and CIN. c. level III. detail by cargo category. Expressed as total number of passengers by ULN and PIN and short tons, and/or measurement tons (including barrels), total square feet of cargo as identified by the ULN or CIN three-position cargo category code. d. level IV. detail expressed as number of passengers and individual dimensional data (expressed in length, width, and height in number of inches) of cargo by equipment type by ULN. e. level V. detail by priority of shipment. Expressed as total number of passengers by Service specialty code in deployment sequence by ULN individual weight (in pounds) and dimensional data (expressed in length, width, and height in number of inches) of equipment in deployment sequence by ULN. (JP 1-02)

lift. Strategic lift. Air, land, and sea transport assets designated for deploying forces and cargo between theaters of operations or between CONUS and theaters of operations.

Theater lift. Air, land, and sea transport assets assigned to a theater CINC for deploying forces and cargo within a theater of operations.

limited-access plan. (DOD) The limited-access plan (like the close-hold plan) is an operation plan that has access restricted to individual Worldwide Military Command and Control System user IDs and terminal IDs. Unlike the close-hold plan, the limited-access plan can be distributed to more than one Joint Operation Planning and Execution System site. See also close-hold plan. (JP 1-02)

limiting factor. (DOD) A factor or condition that, either temporarily or permanently, impedes mission accomplishment. Illustrative examples are transportation network deficiencies, lack of in-place facilities, malpositioned forces or materiel, extreme climatic conditions, distance, transit or overflight rights, political conditions, etc. (JP 1-02)

lines of communications. All the routes--land, water, and air--that connect an operating military force with a base of operations and along which supplies and military forces move. (Joint Pub 4-0)

lodgment area. See airhead. (JP 1-02)

logistics. (DOD) The science of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of forces. In its most comprehensive sense, those aspects of military operations which deal with: a. design and development, acquisition, storage, movement, distribution, maintenance, evacuation, and disposition of materiel; b. movement, evacuation, and hospitalization of personnel; c. acquisition or construction, maintenance, operation, and disposition of facilities; and d. acquisition or furnishing of services. (Approved by JMTGM# 061-2846-94)

logistic assessment. (DOD, NATO) An evaluation of: a. The logistic support required to support particular military operations in a theater of operations, country, or area. b. The actual and/or potential logistics support available for the conduct of military operations either within the theater, country, or area, or located elsewhere. (JP 1-02)

logistics-over-the-shore operations. (DOD) The loading and unloading of ships without the benefit of fixed port facilities, in friendly or nondefended territory, and, in time of war, during phases of theater development in which there is no opposition by the enemy. Also called LOTS. (JP 1-02)

logistics sourcing. (DOD) The identification of the origin and determination of the availability of the time-phased force and deployment data nonunit logistics requirements.

(JP 1-02)

logistic support. (DOD) Logistic support encompasses the logistic services, materiel, and transportation required to support the continental United States-based and worldwide deployed forces. (JP 1-02)

logistics sustainment analysis and feasibility estimator. Application software that gives the JPEC the capability to estimate logistics sustainment requirements and evaluate materiel supportability for deliberate planning and COAs. LOGSAFE replaces the MRG.

maintain. (DOD) When used in the context of deliberate planning, the directed command will keep the referenced operation plan, operation plan in concept format, or concept summary, and any associated Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES) automated data processing files active in accordance with applicable tasking documents describing the type and level of update or maintenance to be performed. General guidance is contained in JOPES, Volumes I and II. See also retain. (JP 1-02)

major combat element. (DOD) Those organizations and units described in the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan that directly produce combat capability. The size of the element varies by Service, force capability, and the total number of such elements available. Examples are Army divisions and separate brigades, Air Force squadrons, Navy task forces, and Marine expeditionary forces. See also major force. (JP 1-02)

major defense program or major force program. A category of program elements that represents a major force, mission, or support function, e.g., strategic forces, intelligence and communications, research and development, supply and maintenance, etc. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

major fleet. (DOD) A principal, permanent subdivision of the operating forces of the Navy with certain supporting shore activities. Presently there are two such fleets: the Pacific Fleet and the Atlantic Fleet. (JP 1-02)

major force. (DOD) A military organization comprised of major combat elements and associated combat support, combat service support, and sustainment increments. The major force is capable of sustained military operations in response to plan employment requirements. See also major combat element. (JP 1-02)

major regional contingency. A regionally centered crisis based on a significant threat to U.S. vital interest in a region that warrants the deployment of forces greater than division-wing combinations.

manifest. (DOD) A document specifying in detail the passengers or items carried for a specific destination. (JP 1-02)

maritime prepositioning ships. (DOD) Civilian-crewed, Military Sealift Command-chartered ships which are organized into three squadrons and are usually forward-deployed. These ships are loaded with prepositioned equipment and 30 days of supplies to support three Marine expeditionary brigades. Also called MPS. (JP 1-02)

master force list. (DOD) A file which contains the current status of each requirement for a given operation plan. The master force list is made available for file transfer service (FTS) transfer to other Global Command and Control System activities from a file produced from the joint deployment system data base. Also called MFL. (JP 1-02)

materiel. (DOD) All items (including ships, tanks, self-propelled weapons, aircraft, etc., and related spares, repair parts, and support equipment, but excluding real property, installations, and utilities) necessary to equip, operate, maintain, and support military activities without distinction as to its application for administrative or combat purposes.

(JP 1-02)

materiel planning. (DOD) A subset of logistic planning and consists of a four-step process: a. requirements definition. Requirements for significant items must be calculated at item level detail (i.e., national stock number) to support sustainability planning and analysis. Requirements include unit roundout, consumption and attrition replacement, safety stock, and the needs of allies. b. apportionment. Items are apportioned to the combatant commanders based on a global scenario to avoid sourcing of items to multiple theaters. The basis for apportionment is the capability provided by unit stocks, host nation support, theater prepositioned war reserve stocks and industrial base, and continental United States Department of Defense stockpiles and available production. Item apportionment cannot exceed total capabilities. c. sourcing. Sourcing is the matching of available capabilities on a given date against item requirements to support sustainability analysis and the identification of locations to support transportation planning. Sourcing of any item is done within the combatant commanderís apportionment. d. documentation. Sourced item requirements and corresponding shortfalls are major inputs to the combatant commanderís sustainability analysis. Sourced item requirements are translated into movement requirements and documented in the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System data base for transportation feasibility analysis. Movement requirements for nonsignificant items are estimated in tonnage. (JP 1-02)

medical evacuees. (DOD) Personnel who are wounded, injured, or ill and must be moved to or between medical facilities. (JP 1-02)

medical planning module. The JOPES ADP application program used to determine the impact of an operation on the total medical system, including the amount of medical support needed, such as bed, MEDEVAC, and blood/fluid requirements. (adapted from JOPES Userís Manual)

memorandum of policy. A statement of policy approved by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and issued for the guidance of the Services, unified and specified commands, and Joint Staff. (Joint Pub 1-01)

military capability. (DOD) The ability to achieve a specified wartime objective (win a war or battle, destroy a target set). It includes four major components: force structure, modernization, readiness, and sustainability. a. force structure--Numbers, size, and composition of the units that comprise our Defense forces; e.g., divisions, ships, airwings. b. modernization--Technical sophistication of forces, units, weapon systems, and equipments. c. unit readiness--The ability to provide capabilities required by the combatant commanders to execute their assigned missions. This is derived from the ability of each unit to deliver the outputs for which it was designed. d. sustainability--The ability to maintain the necessary level and duration of operational activity to achieve military objectives. Sustainability is a function of providing for and maintaining those levels of ready forces, materiel, and consumables necessary to support military effort. See also readiness. (Approved by JMTGM# 017-95)

military deception. (DOD) Actions executed to deliberately mislead adversary military decisionmakers as to friendly military capabilities, intentions, and operations, thereby causing the adversary to take specific actions (or inactions) that will contribute to the accomplishment of the friendly mission. The five categories of military deception are: a. strategic military deception--Military deception planned and executed by and in support of senior military commanders to result in adversary military policies and actions that support the originatorís strategic military objectives, policies, and operations. b. operational military deception--Military deception planned and executed by and in support of operational-level commanders to result in adversary actions that are favorable to the originatorís objectives and operations. Operational military deception is planned and conducted in a theater of war to support campaigns and major operations. c. tactical military deception--Military deception planned and executed by and in support of tactical commanders to result in adversary actions that are favorable to the originatorís objectives and operations. Tactical military deception is planned and conducted to support battles and engagements. d. Service military deception--Military deception planned and executed by the Services that pertain to Service support to joint operations. Service military deception is designed to protect and enhance the combat capabilities of Service forces and systems. e. military deception in support of operations security (OPSEC)--Military deception planned and executed by and in support of all levels of command to support the prevention of the inadvertent compromise of sensitive or classified activities, capabilities, or intentions. Deceptive OPSEC measures are designed to distract foreign intelligence away from, or provide cover for, military operations and activities. See also deception means. (Approved by JMTGM# 055-2840-94)

military department. One of the departments within the Department of Defense created by the National Security Act of 1947, as amended (Department of the Army, Navy, or Air Force). (JP 1-02)

military objectives. (DOD) The derived set of military actions to be taken to implement National Command Authorities guidance in support of national objectives. Defines the results to be achieved by the military and assigns tasks to commanders. See also national objectives. (JP 1-02)

military options. (DOD) A range of military force responses that can be projected to accomplish assigned tasks. Options include one or a combination of the following: civic action, humanitarian assistance, civil affairs, and other military activities to develop positive relationships with other countries; confidence building and other measures to reduce military tensions; military presence; activities to convey threats to adversaries and truth projections; military deceptions and psychological operations; quarantines, blockades, and harassment operations; raids; intervention campaigns; armed conflict involving air, land, maritime, and strategic warfare campaigns and operations; support for law enforcement authorities to counter international criminal activities (terrorism, narcotics trafficking, slavery, and piracy); support for law enforcement authorities to suppress domestic rebellion; and support for insurgencies, counterinsurgency, and civil war in foreign countries. (JP 1-02)

Military Service. (DOD) A branch of the Armed Forces of the United States, established by act of Congress, in which persons are appointed, enlisted, or inducted for military service, and which operates and is administered within a military or executive department. The Military Services are: the United States Army, the United States Navy, the United States Air Force, the United States Marine Corps, and the United States Coast Guard. (JP 1-02)

mission. (DOD) 1. The task, together with the purpose, that clearly indicates the action to be taken and the reason therefor. 2. In common usage, especially when applied to lower military units, a duty assigned to an individual or unit; a task. 3. The dispatching of one or more aircraft to accomplish one particular task. (JP 1-02)

mission type order. (DOD) 1. Order issued to a lower unit that includes the accomplishment of the total mission assigned to the higher headquarters. 2. Order to a unit to perform a mission without specifying how it is to be accomplished. (JP 1-02)

mobility. (DOD, NATO) A quality or capability of military forces which permits them to move from place to place while retaining the ability to fulfill their primary mission.

(JP 1-02)

mobility analysis. (DOD) An in-depth examination of all aspects of transportation planning in support of operation plan and operation order development. (JP 1-02)

mobilization. (DOD) 1. The act of assembling and organizing national resources to support national objectives in time of war or other emergencies. 2. The process by which the Armed Forces or part of them are brought to a state of readiness for war or other national emergency. This includes activating all or part of the Reserve Components as well as assembling and organizing personnel, supplies, and materiel. Mobilization of the Armed Forces includes but is not limited to the following categories: a. selective mobilization--Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress and/or the President to mobilize Reserve Component units, individual ready reservists, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a domestic emergency that is not the result of an enemy attack. b. partial mobilization--Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress (up to full mobilization) or by the President (not more than 1,000,000 for not more than 24 consecutive months) to mobilize Ready Reserve Component units, individual reservists, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security. c. full mobilization--Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress and the President to mobilize all Reserve Component units in the existing approved force structure, all individual reservists, retired military personnel, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security. Reserve personnel can be placed on active duty for the duration of the emergency plus six months. d. total mobilization--Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress and the President to organize and/or generate additional units or personnel, beyond the existing force structure, and the resources needed for their support, to meet the total requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-95)

mobilization-deployment planning. The act of using authorized systems and measures for planning, coordinating, and monitoring movements and deployments of mobilized forces and materiel necessary to meet military objectives. (JOPES Userís Manual)

modified OPLAN. A plan developed by modifying the primary OPLAN to cover a new concept of operations, with new assumptions, and an adjusted TPFDD.

module. A collection of one or more software programs that accomplishes major functions in an application program or subsystem.

movement control. (DOD) 1. The planning, routing, scheduling, and control of personnel and cargo movements over lines of communications. 2. An organization responsible for the planning, routing, scheduling, and control of personnel and cargo movements over lines of communications. Also called movement control center. See also non-unit-related cargo; non-unit-related personnel. (Approved by JMTGM# 046-95)

movement schedule. (DOD) A schedule developed to monitor or track a separate entity whether it is a force requirement, cargo or personnel increment, or lift asset. The schedule reflects the assignment of specific lift resources (such as an aircraft or ship) that will be used to move the personnel and cargo included in a specific movement increment. Arrival and departure times at ports of embarkation, etc., are detailed to show a flow and workload at each location. Movement schedules are detailed enough to support plan implementation. (JP 1-02)

movement table. (DOD, NATO) A table giving detailed instructions or data for a move. When necessary it will be qualified by the words road, rail, sea, air, etc., to signify the type of movement. Normally issued as an annex to a movement order or instruction.

(JP 1-02)

multiapportionment. The apportionment of the same forces to more than one CINC for use in developing plans that cover the same specific period of time.

multi-Service doctrine. (DOD) Fundamental principles that guide the employment of forces of two or more Services in coordinated action toward a common objective. It is ratified by two or more Services, and is promulgated in multi-Service publications that identify the participating Services, e.g., Army-Navy doctrine. See also combined doctrine; joint doctrine; joint tactics, techniques, and procedures. (JP 1-02)

nation assistance. (DOD) Civil and/or military assistance rendered to a nation by foreign forces within that nationís territory during peacetime, crises or emergencies, or war based on agreements mutually concluded between nations. Nation assistance programs include, but are not limited to, security assistance, foreign internal defense, other US Code title 10 (DOD) programs, and activities performed on a reimbursable basis by Federal agencies or international organizations. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-95)

National Command Authorities. (DOD) The President and the Secretary of Defense or their duly deputized alternates or successors. Also called NCA. (JP 1-02)

national emergency. (DOD) A condition declared by the President or the Congress by virtue of powers previously vested in them that authorize certain emergency actions to be undertaken in the national interest. Action to be taken may include partial, full, or total mobilization of national resources. See also mobilization. (JP 1-02)

National Military Command System. (DOD) The priority component of the Global Command and Control System designed to support the National Command Authorities and Joint Chiefs of Staff in the exercise of their responsibilities. Also called NMCS.

(JP 1-02)

national objectives. (DOD) The aims, derived from national goals and interests, toward which a national policy or strategy is directed and efforts and resources of the nation are applied. See also military objectives. (JP 1-02)

National Security Council. (DOD) A governmental body specifically designed to assist the President in integrating all spheres of national security policy. The President, Vice President, Secretary of State, and Secretary of Defense are statutory members. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Director, Central Intelligence Agency; and the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs serve as advisers. Also called NSC. (JP 1-02)

national security directive. One of a series of directives that announce Presidential decisions implementing national policy objectives in all areas of national security. All NSDs in this series are individually identified by number and signed by the President.

national security interests. (DOD) The foundation for the development of valid national objectives that define US goals or purposes. National security interests include preserving US political identity, framework, and institutions; fostering economic well-being; and bolstering international order supporting the vital interests of the United States and its allies. (JP 1-02)

non-air-transportable cargo. Cargo that exceeds any of the following dimensions: 1,453" x 216" x 156", or between 114" and 156" high and exceeding 144" wide. (adapted from JOPES Userís Data Element Dictionary)

noncombatant evacuation operations. (DOD) Operations conducted to relocate threatened noncombatants from locations in a foreign country. These operations normally involve United States citizens whose lives are in danger, and may also include selected foreign nationals. Also called NEO. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-95)

noncombatant evacuees. 1. U.S. citizens who may be ordered to evacuate by competent authority include the following: a. Civilian employees of all agencies of the U.S. Government and their dependents. b. Military personnel of the U.S. Armed Forces specifically designated for evacuation as noncombatants.

nonorganic transportation requirement. Unit personnel and cargo for which the transportation source must be an outside agency, normally a component of USTRANSCOM. (adapted from the JOPES Userís Manual)

nonstandard unit. A force requirement identified in a TPFDD for which movement characteristics have not been described in the TUCHA file. The planner is required to submit detailed movement characteristics for these units. (adapted from JOPES Userís Manual)

nonunit record. A TPFDD file entry for non-unit-related cargo and personnel; characteristics include using and providing organization, type of movement, routing data, cargo category, weight, volume, area required, and number of personnel requiring transportation. (adapted from Joint Pub 1-03.16)

non-unit-related cargo. (DOD) All equipment and supplies requiring transportation to an area of operations, other than those identified as the equipment or accompanying supplies of a specific unit (e.g., resupply, military support for allies, and support for nonmilitary programs, such as civil relief). (JP 1-02)

non-unit-related personnel. (DOD) All personnel requiring transportation to or from an area of operations, other than those assigned to a specific unit (e.g., filler personnel; replacements; temporary duty/temporary additional duty personnel; civilians; medical evacuees; and retrograde personnel). (JP 1-02)

NOPLAN. Designation for a contingency for which no operation plan has been published.

normal operations. (DOD) Generally and collectively, the broad functions which a combatant commander undertakes when assigned responsibility for a given geographic or functional area. Except as otherwise qualified in certain unified command plan paragraphs which relate to particular commands, "normal operations" of a combatant commander include: planning for and execution of operations throughout the range of military operations; planning and conduct of cold war activities; planning for and administration of military assistance; and maintaining the relationships and exercising the directive or coordinating authority prescribed in Joint Pub 0-2, Admin. Pub 1.1, and Joint Pub 4-01. (JP 1-02)

obligations. Amounts of orders, contracts, services, and similar transactions that must be paid during a particular period. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

on-call. (DOD) 1. A term used to signify that a prearranged concentration, air strike, or final protective fire may be called for. 2. Preplanned, identified force or materiel requirements without designated time-phase and destination information. Such requirements will be called forward upon order of competent authority. (JP 1-02)

on-line. Having direct and immediate connection to the computer. (JOPES Userís Data Element Dictionary)

operation. (DOD, NATO) A military action or the carrying out of a strategic, tactical, service, training, or administrative military mission; the process of carrying on combat, including movement, supply, attack, defense and maneuvers needed to gain the objectives of any battle or campaign. (JP 1-02)

operation order. (DOD) A directive issued by a commander to subordinate commanders for the purpose of effecting the coordinated execution of an operation. Also called OPORD. (JP 1-02)

operation plan. (DOD) Any plan, except for the Single Integrated Operation Plan, for the conduct of military operations. Plans are prepared by combatant commanders in response to requirements established by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and by commanders of subordinate commands in response to requirements tasked by the establishing unified commander. Operation plans are prepared in either a complete format (OPLAN) or as a concept plan (CONPLAN). The CONPLAN can be published with or without a time-phased force and deployment data (TPFDD) file. a. OPLAN--An operation plan for the conduct of joint operations that can be used as a basis for development of an operation order (OPORD). An OPLAN identifies the forces and supplies required to execute the CINCís Strategic Concept and a movement schedule of these resources to the theater of operations. The forces and supplies are identified in TPFDD files. OPLANs will include all phases of the tasked operation. The plan is prepared with the appropriate annexes, appendixes, and TPFDD files as described in the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System manuals containing planning policies, procedures, and formats. Also called OPLAN. b. CONPLAN--An operation plan in an abbreviated format that would require considerable expansion or alteration to convert it into an OPLAN or OPORD. A CONPLAN contains the CINCís Strategic Concept and those annexes and appendixes deemed necessary by the combatant commander to complete planning. Generally, detailed support requirements are not calculated and TPFDD files are not prepared. Also called CONPLAN. c. CONPLAN with TPFDD--A CONPLAN with TPFDD is the same as a CONPLAN except that it requires more detailed planning for phased deployment of forces. See also operation order; time-phased force and deployment data. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

operational chain of command. The chain of command established for a particular operation or series of continuing operations. (Joint Pub 1-02)

operational continuum. The general states of peace, conflict, and war within which various types of military operations and activities are conducted.

operational control. (DOD) Transferable command authority that may be exercised by commanders at any echelon at or below the level of combatant command. Operational control is inherent in combatant command (command authority). Operational control may be delegated and is the authority to perform those functions of command over subordinate forces involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and giving authoritative direction necessary to accomplish the mission. Operational control includes authoritative direction over all aspects of military operations and joint training necessary to accomplish missions assigned to the command. Operational control should be exercised through the commanders of subordinate organizations. Normally this authority is exercised through subordinate joint force commanders and Service and/or functional component commanders. Operational control normally provides full authority to organize commands and forces and to employ those forces as the commander in operational control considers necessary to accomplish assigned missions. Operational control does not, in and of itself, include authoritative direction for logistics or matters of administration, discipline, internal organization, or unit training. Also called OPCON. See also combatant command; combatant command (command authority). (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

operational level of war. (DOD) The level of war at which campaigns and major operations are planned, conducted, and sustained to accomplish strategic objectives within theaters or areas of operations. Activities at this level link tactics and strategy by establishing operational objectives needed to accomplish the strategic objectives, sequencing events to achieve the operational objectives, initiating actions, and applying resources to bring about and sustain these events. These activities imply a broader dimension of time or space than do tactics; they ensure the logistic and administrative support of tactical forces, and provide the means by which tactical successes are exploited to achieve strategic objectives. See also strategic level of war; tactical level of war. (JP 1-02)

operational mobility. The quality or capability that permits military forces to move from place to place within designated areas of the theater while retaining the ability to fulfill their primary mission.

operations security. (DOD) A process of identifying critical information and subsequently analyzing friendly actions attendant to military operations and other activities to: a. Identify those actions that can be observed by adversary intelligence systems. b. Determine indicators hostile intelligence systems might obtain that could be interpreted or pieced together to derive critical information in time to be useful to adversaries. c. Select and execute measures that eliminate or reduce to an acceptable level the vulnerabilities of friendly actions to adversary exploitation. Also called OPSEC. See also command and control warfare. (JP 1-02)

OPLAN-dependent force module. A force module that has been created or tailored by the supported commander or components to fit a specific planning task. OPLAN-dependent force modules usually include sustainment based on theater planning factors and sourced force records.

organic. (DOD) Assigned to and forming an essential part of a military organization. Organic parts of a unit are those listed in its table of organization for the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, and are assigned to the administrative organizations of the operating forces for the Navy. (JP 1-02)

organic transportation. Transportation resources that are assigned to a unit and can give the lift capability for all or part of that unitís movement requirements.

origin. (DOD) Beginning point of a deployment where unit or non-unit-related cargo or personnel are located. (JP 1-02)

outlays. Obligations that are liquidated when checks are issued or cash disbursed. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

outsized cargo. Cargo that exceeds 1,090" x 117" x 105", that is, too large for C-130/C-141 aircraft. (JOPES Userís Data Element Dictionary)

oversized cargo. Cargo that exceeds the usable dimension of a 463L pallet, 104" x 84" x 96", or a height set by the particular model of aircraft. (JOPES Userís Data Element Dictionary)

peacetime. A nonhostile state wherein political, economic, informational, and military measures, short of combat operations or active support to warring parties, are employed to achieve national objectives.

permanent file. A term used to identify disk storage that remains part of the computer resources at all times. JOPES ADP files that are stored on permanent files include APORTS, PORTS, GEOFILE, TUCHA, ASSETS, and CHSTR. (JOPES Userís Manual)

personnel increment number. (DOD) A seven-character, alphanumeric field that uniquely describes a non-unit-related personnel entry (line) in a Joint Operation Planning and Execution System time-phased force and deployment data. Also called PIN. (JP 1-02)

pipeline. (DOD, NATO) In logistics, the channel of support or a specific portion thereof by means of which materiel or personnel flow from sources of procurement to their point of use. (JP 1-02)

plan identification number. (DOD) 1. A command-unique four-digit number followed by a suffix indicating the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP) year for which the plan is written, e.g., "2220-95". 2. In the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES) data base, a five-digit number representing the command-unique four-digit identifier, followed by a one character, alphabetic suffix indicating the operation plan option, or a one-digit number numeric value indicating the JSCP year for which the plan is written. Also called PID. (JP 1-02)

plan information capability. (DOD) This capability allows a supported command to enter and update key elements of information in an operation plan stored in the Joint Operation Planning and Execution System. (JP 1-02)

plan summary. A required element of an operation plan that gives a brief description of the mission, the general situation, the concept of operations, the major forces required, command arrangements, and the commanderís appraisal of logistics feasibility. (JOPES Userís Manual)

planned resupply. The shipping of supplies in a regular flow described by existing preplanned schedules and organizations, which will usually include some form of planned procurement. (adapted from JP 1-02)

planning factor. (DOD, NATO) A multiplier used in planning to estimate the amount and type of effort involved in a contemplated operation. Planning factors are often expressed as rates, ratios, or lengths of time. (JP 1-02)

planning order. (DOD) 1. An order issued by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to initiate execution planning. The planning order will normally follow a commanderís estimate and a planning order will normally take the place of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff alert order. National Command Authorities approval of a selected course of action is not required before issuing a Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff planning order. 2. A planning directive that provides essential planning guidance and directs the initiation of execution planning before the directing authority approves a military course of action. See also execution planning. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

planning, programming, and budgeting system. The cyclic process that produces the DOD portion of the Presidentís budget submission to Congress. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.14)

port. (DOD) A place at which ships may discharge or receive their cargoes. It includes any port accessible to ships on the seacoast, navigable rivers or inland waterways. The term "ports" should not be used in conjunction with air facilities which are designated as aerial ports, airports, etc. (JP 1-02)

port of debarkation. (DOD) The geographic point at which cargo or personnel are discharged. May be a seaport or aerial port of debarkation. For unit requirements, it may or may not coincide with the destination. Also called POD. See also port of embarkation. (JP 1-02)

port of embarkation. (DOD) The geographic point in a routing scheme from which cargo or personnel depart. May be a seaport or aerial port from which personnel and equipment flow to port of debarkation. For unit and nonunit requirements, it may or may not coincide with the origin. Also called POE. See also port of debarkation. (JP 1-02)

port of support. The geographic point (port or airport) in an objective area that is the terminal point for strategic deployment for non-unit-related supplies. Each component designates ports of support for four categories of resupply: general cargo, ammunition, POL, and air deliveries. (adapted from the JOPES Userís Manual)

preliminary movement schedule. (DOD) A projection of the routing of movement requirements reflected in the time-phased force and deployment data, from origin to destination, including identification of origins, ports of embarkation, ports of debarkation, and en route stops; associated time frames for arrival and departure at each location; type of lift assets required to accomplish the move; and cargo details by carrier. Schedules are sufficiently detailed to support comparative analysis of requirements against capabilities and to develop location workloads for reception and onward movement. (JP 1-02)

prepositioned war reserve requirement. (DOD) That portion of the war reserve materiel requirement which the current Secretary of Defense guidance dictates be reserved and positioned at or near the point of planned use or issue to the user prior to hostilities to reduce reaction time and to assure timely support of a specific force/project until replenishment can be effected. (JP 1-02)

prepositioned war reserve stock. (DOD) The assets that are designated to satisfy the prepositioned war reserve materiel requirement. (JP 1-02)

Presidential Selected Reserve Callup Authority. (DOD) Provision of a public law (US Code, title 10 (DOD), section 12304) that provides the President a means to activate, without a declaration of national emergency, not more than 200,000 members of the Selected Reserve for not more than 270 days to meet the support requirements of any operational mission. Members called under this provision may not be used for disaster relief or to suppress insurrection. This authority has particular utility when used in circumstances in which the escalatory national or international signals of partial or full mobilization would be undesirable. Forces available under this authority can provide a tailored, limited-scope, deterrent, or operational response, or may be used as a precursor to any subsequent mobilization. Also called PSRC. See also mobilization. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-95)

presidentís budget. The document sent to Congress each January estimating Government receipts and outlays for the next fiscal year and recommending appropriations in detail. (adapted from GAO glossary)

procedure. (DOD) A procedure begins with a specific, documentable event that causes an activity to occur. The activity must produce a product that normally affects another external organization. Frequently, that product will be the event that causes another procedure to occur. It is important to recognize that a procedure determines "what" an organization must do at critical periods but does not direct "how" it will be done. (JP 1-02)

program decision memorandum. Secretary of Defense decision on the Program Objective Memorandums that are distributed to DOD components and OMB as the basis for the Budget Estimates Submission. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

program element. A primary data element in the Future-Years Defense Program that represents (1) DOD missions or (2) units and their resources. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

program objective memorandum. The recommendations of the Service secretaries, USCINCSOCOM, and heads of DOD agencies to the Secretary of Defense on the allocation of resources for proposed programs to achieve assigned missions and objectives. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

program review group. A working group subordinate to the Defense Planning and Resources Board composed of DOD staff members who prepare papers and briefings for Defense Planning and Resources Board deliberations. (adapted from DOD Instruction 7045.7)

psychological operations. (DOD) Planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of foreign governments, organizations, groups, and individuals. The purpose of psychological operations is to induce or reinforce foreign attitudes and behavior favorable to the originatorís objectives. Also called PSYOP. (Approved by JMTGM# 070-95)

query. As applied to JOPES permissions, "query" is one of the ten functional permissions granted users. The permission is limited to retrieving and viewing information on the terminal display screen. The other primary functions allow users to update, perform database management and scheduling functions, and print charts and reports. (adapted from JOPES Userís Manual)

readiness planning. (DOD) Operational planning required for peacetime operations. Its objective is the maintenance of high states of readiness and the deterrence of potential enemies. It includes planning activities that influence day-to-day operations and the peacetime posture of forces. As such, its focus is on general capabilities and readiness rather than the specifics of a particular crisis, either actual or potential. The assignment of geographic responsibilities to combatant commanders, establishment of readiness standards and levels, development of peacetime deployment patterns, coordination of reconnaissance and surveillance assets and capabilities, and planning of joint exercises are examples of readiness planning. No formal joint planning system exists for readiness planning such as exists for contingency and execution planning. (JP 1-02)

ready-to-load date. (DOD) The day, relative to C-day, in a time-phased force and deployment data when the unit, nonunit equipment, and forces are prepared to depart their origin on organic transportation or are prepared to begin loading on US Transportation Command-provided transportation. Also called RLD. (JP 1-02)

record. A collection of data elements pertaining to one logical subject. In JOPES, for example, all the data elements used to describe a force requirement and its routing are stored in the "force record." For resupply and replacement personnel, all the data elements are stored in non-unit-related cargo records and non-unit-related personnel records. (JDS Userís Manual)

redeployment. (DOD) The transfer of a unit, an individual, or supplies deployed in one area to another area, or to another location within the area, or to the zone of interior for the purpose of further employment. (JP 1-02)

regeneration. The capability to generate additional military power in a timely manner to counter a rapid buildup of enemy forces. Actions include activation of all Reserve component units with increased readiness and training levels (up to full mobilization--no new units) and the acceleration of the industrial production base.

regional conflict. A conflict with a specific focus in a CINCís AOR.

replacements. (DOD) Personnel required to take the place of others who depart a unit.

(JP 1-02)

required delivery date. (DOD) A date, relative to C-day, when a unit must arrive at its destination and complete offloading to properly support the concept of operations. Also called RDD. (JP 1-02)

requirements capability. (DOD) This capability provides a Joint Operation Planning and Execution System user the ability to identify, update, review, and delete data on forces and sustainment required to support an operation plan or course of action. (JP 1-02)

reserve component category. (DOD) The category that identifies an individualís status in a reserve component. The three reserve component categories are Ready Reserve, Standby Reserve, and Retired Reserve. Each reservist is identified by a specific reserve component category designation. (JP 1-02)

resource and unit monitoring. (DOD) Worldwide Military Command and Control System application systems that support approved requirements relating to resource and unit monitoring, readiness assessment, situation assessment, and operations by integrating data from functional areas such as operations, logistics, personnel, and medical.

(JP 1-02)

resources. (DOD) The forces, materiel, and other assets or capabilities apportioned or allocated to the commander of a unified or specified command. (JP 1-02)

response time. The estimated or actual time necessary for a unit, when alerted, to achieve the directed deployability posture.

retain. (DOD) When used in the context of deliberate planning, the directed command will keep the referenced operation plan, operation plan in concept format, or concept summary and any associated Joint Operation Planning and Execution System automated data processing files in an inactive library or status. The plan and its associated files will not be maintained unless directed by follow-on guidance. See also maintain. (JP 1-02)

retrograde cargo. (DOD) Cargo evacuated from a theater of operations. (JP 1-02)

retrograde personnel. (DOD) Personnel evacuated from a theater of operations who may include medical patients, noncombatants, and civilians. (JP 1-02)

safety level of supply. (DOD) The quantity of materiel, in addition to the operating level of supply, required to be on hand to permit continuous operations in the event of minor interruption of normal replenishment or unpredictable fluctuations in demand. (JP 1-02)

scheduled arrival date. (DOD) The projected arrival date of a specified movement requirement at a specified location. (JP 1-02)

schedules. (DOD) The carrier itinerary which may involve cargo and passengers.

(JP 1-02)

scheduling and movement capability. (DOD) The capability required by Joint Operation Planning and Execution System planners and operators to allow for review and update of scheduling and movement data before and during implementation of a deployment operation. (JP 1-02)

sealift readiness program. (DOD) A formal agreement, pursuant to the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, as amended, between US-flag, dry-cargo carriers and the government for the acquisition of ships and related equipment under conditions of less than full mobilization. (JP 1-02)

security assistance. (DOD) Group of programs authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and the Arms Export Control Act of 1976, as amended, or other related statutes by which the United States provides defense articles, military training, and other defense-related services, by grant, loan, credit, or cash sales in furtherance of national policies and objectives. (JP 1-02)

sequential operations. Operations conducted in sequence or by phases that correspond to established execution priorities or to compensate for a lack of resources.

service force module. A hypothetical force module built per Service doctrine composed of combat, combat support, and combat service support forces and sustainment for an estimated period, e.g., 30 days.

short ton (STON or S/T). The unit of measure (2,000 lbs.) for equipment or supplies other than Class III. (JOPES Userís Manual)

shortfall. (DOD) The lack of forces, equipment, personnel, materiel, or capability, reflected as the difference between the resources identified as a plan requirement and those apportioned to a combatant commander for planning, that would adversely affect the commandís ability to accomplish its mission. (JP 1-02)

show of force. (DOD) An operation, designed to demonstrate US resolve, which involves increased visibility of U.S. deployed forces in an attempt to defuse a specific situation, that if allowed to continue, may be detrimental to U.S. interests or national objectives. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-95)

SIGINT operational control. (DOD) The authoritative direction of signals intelligence (SIGINT) activities, including tasking and allocation of effort, and the authoritative prescription of those uniform techniques and standards by which SIGINT information is collected, processed, and reported. (JP 1-02)

sourcing (force). The deliberate planning or crisis action planning activity that identifies actual forces, equipment, personnel, materiel, and lift assets that could be made available, as of a specified date, to fill the requirements of operation plans.

sourcing (logistics). The identification of the origin and determination of the availability of the non-unit-related logistics requirements in the TPFDD. (JOPES Userís Manual)

special operations. (DOD) Operations conducted by specially organized, trained, and equipped military and paramilitary forces to achieve military, political, economic, or psychological objectives by unconventional military means in hostile, denied, or politically sensitive areas. These operations are conducted during peacetime competition, conflict, and war, independently or in coordination with operations of conventional, nonspecial operations forces. Political-military considerations frequently shape special operations, requiring clandestine, covert, or low visibility techniques and oversight at the national level. Special operations differ from conventional operations in degree of physical and political risk, operational techniques, mode of employment, independence from friendly support, and dependence on detailed operational intelligence and indigenous assets. Also called SO. (JP 1-02)

specified command. (DOD) A command that has a broad, continuing mission, normally functional, and is established and so designated by the President through the Secretary of Defense with the advice and assistance of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It normally is composed of forces from a single Military Department. Also called specified combatant command. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

staff estimates. (DOD) Assessments of courses of action by the various staff elements of a command that serve as the foundation of the commanderís estimate. (JP 1-02)

standard unit. A type unit whose UTC and movement characteristics are described in the TUCHA file. (JOPES Userís Manual)

strategic direction. The guidance expressed through national security strategy, national military strategy, and theater strategy relative to the attainment of strategic goals and objectives. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

strategic estimate. (DOD) The estimate of the broad strategic factors that influence the determination of missions, objectives, and courses of action. The estimate is continuous and includes the strategic direction received from the National Command Authorities or the authoritative body of an alliance or coalition. See also commanderís estimate of the situation. (JP 1-02)

strategic intent. The expression of the goals and desired ends of a strategy. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

strategic level of war. (DOD) The level of war at which a nation, often as a member of a group of nations, determines national or multinational (alliance or coalition) security objectives and guidance, and develops and uses national resources to accomplish these objectives. Activities at this level establish national and multinational military objectives; sequence initiatives; define limits and assess risks for the use of military and other instruments of national power; develop global plans or theater war plans to achieve these objectives; and provide military forces and other capabilities in accordance with strategic plans. See also operational level of war; tactical level of war. (JP 1-02)

strategic logistics. In a general sense, the art and science of harnessing the economic and societal strengths of a nation for national defense. In the specific sense, strategic logistics is the process of planning for, coordinating, and allocating the manpower, materiel, infrastructure, and services required for military, war production, and civil sector needs. It requires coordination between the executive and legislative branches, state governments, and industry. Force generation and mobilization are inclusive components of strategic logistics. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

strategic mobility. (DOD) The capability to deploy and sustain military forces worldwide in support of national strategy. See also mobility. (JP 1-02)

strategic sealift force. Common-user sealift assets of the MSC force, including fast sealift ships and pre-positioned ships on completion of their mission and release, that furnish the capability to deploy and sustain military forces. The normal peacetime force may be augmented by shipping from the Ready Reserve Fleet and National Defense Reserve Fleet and from U.S. and allied merchant fleets. (Joint Pub 1-01)

strategy determination. (DOD) The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System function in which analysis of changing events in the international environment and the development of national strategy to respond to those events is conducted. In joint operation planning, the responsibility for recommending military strategy to the National Command Authorities lies with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in consultation with the other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and in concert with supported commanders. In the deliberate planning process, the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan is produced as a result of this process. In the Crisis Assessment Phase of the crisis action planning process, Crisis Action Planning procedures are used to formulate decisions for direct development of possible military courses of action. (JP 1-02)

subordinate command. (DOD) A command consisting of the commander and all those individuals, units, detachments, organizations, or installations that have been placed under the command by the authority establishing the subordinate command. (JP 1-02)

suitability. (DOD) Operation plan review criterion. The determination that the course of action will reasonably accomplish the identified objectives, mission, or task if carried out successfully. See also acceptability; adequacy; completeness; feasibility. (JP 1-02)

summary reference file. A JOPES file containing information that expands requirements data contained in a JOPES TPFDD. (adapted from JOPES Userís Manual)

supported commander. (DOD) The commander having primary responsibility for all aspects of a task assigned by the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan or other joint operation planning authority. In the context of joint operation planning, this term refers to the commander who prepares operation plans or operation orders in response to requirements of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. See also joint operation planning. (Approved by JMTGM# 081-95)

supporting commander. (DOD) A commander who provides augmentation forces or other support to a supported commander or who develops a supporting plan. Includes the designated combatant commands and Defense agencies as appropriate. See also supported commander; supporting plan. (JP 1-02)

supporting forces. (DOD) Forces stationed in, or to be deployed to, an area of operations to provide support for the execution of an operation order. Combatant command (command authority) of supporting forces is not passed to the supported commander.

(JP 1-02)

supporting plan. (DOD) An operation plan prepared by a supporting commander or a subordinate commander to satisfy the requests or requirements of the supported commanderís plan. See also supported commander; supporting commander. (JP 1-02)

sustainability. See military capability. (JP 1-02)

sustaining supply. Materiel required to support a unit after arrival in-theater from the time accompanying supply and PWRMS are anticipated to run out until regular resupply begins. (adapted from Joint Pub 1-02, "sustaining stocks")

sustainment. (DOD) The provision of personnel, logistic, and other support required to maintain and prolong operations or combat until successful accomplishment or revision of the mission or of the national objective. (JP 1-02)

tactical command, control, communications, and computer system(s). (DOD) The facilities, equipment, communications, procedures, and personnel essential to theater-level and below-theater-level commanders for planning, directing, and controlling operations of assigned and attached forces pursuant to the mission assigned and which provide for the conveyance and/or exchange of data and information from one person or force to another. See also command, control, communications, and computer systems. (Approved by JMTGM# 081-95)

tactical level of war. (DOD) The level of war at which battles and engagements are planned and executed to accomplish military objectives assigned to tactical units or task forces. Activities at this level focus on the ordered arrangement and maneuver of combat elements in relation to each other and to the enemy to achieve combat objectives. See also operational level of war; strategic level of war. (JP 1-02)

technology insertion project. A project that permits the sharing of functional JOPES ADP applications across different computer systems. TIP combines and integrates existing and projected JOPES capabilities into an application server architecture. Through TIP, operational planners can access capabilities (DART, LOGSAFE, JFAST, FAPES) from a variety of workstations integrated into a network including a WWMCCS host mainframe.

termination objectives. Specific objectives that define the intended manner of conflict termination and the required military and diplomatic achievements to attain it. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

theater. (DOD) The geographical area outside the continental United States for which a commander of a combatant command has been assigned responsibility. (JP 1-02)

theater of focus. (DOD) A theater in which operations are most critical to national interests and are assigned the highest priority for allocation of resources. (JP 1-02)

theater strategy. (DOD) The art and science of developing integrated strategic concepts and courses of action directed toward securing the objectives of national and alliance or coalition security policy and strategy by the use of force, threatened use of force, or operations not involving the use of force within a theater. (JP 1-02)

threat identification and assessment. (DOD) The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System function that provides timely warning of potential threats to US interests; intelligence collection requirements; the effects of environmental, physical, and health hazards, and cultural factors on friendly and enemy operations; and determines the enemy military posture and possible intentions. (JP 1-02)

throughput. (DOD) The average quantity of cargo and passengers that can pass through a port on a daily basis from arrival at the port to loading onto a ship or plane, or from the discharge from a ship or plane to the exit (clearance) from the port complex. Throughput is usually expressed in measurement tons, short tons, or passengers. Reception and storage limitation may affect final throughput. (JP 1-02)

time-phased force and deployment data. (DOD) The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System data base portion of an operation plan; it contains time-phased force data, non-unit-related cargo and personnel data, and movement data for the operation plan, including: a. In-place units. b. Units to be deployed to support the operation plan with a priority indicating the desired sequence for their arrival at the port of debarkation. c. Routing of forces to be deployed. d. Movement data associated with deploying forces.

e. Estimates of non-unit-related cargo and personnel movements to be conducted concurrently with the deployment of forces. f. Estimate of transportation requirements that must be fulfilled by common-user lift resources as well as those requirements that can be fulfilled by assigned or attached transportation resources. Also called TPFDD. See also time-phased force and deployment list. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

time-phased force and deployment list. (DOD) Appendix 1 to Annex A of the operation plan. It identifies types and/or actual units required to support the operation plan and indicates origin and ports of debarkation or ocean area. It may also be generated as a computer listing from the time-phased force and deployment data. Also called TPFDL. See also time-phased force and deployment data. (JP 1-02)

times. (DOD) (C-, D-, M-days end at 2400 hours Universal Time (zulu time) and are assumed to be 24 hours long for planning.) The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff normally coordinates the proposed date with the commanders of the appropriate unified and specified commands, as well as any recommended changes to C-day. L-hour will be established per plan, crisis, or theater of operations and will apply to both air and surface movements. Normally, L-hour will be established to allow C-day to be a 24-hour day. a. C-day. The unnamed day on which a deployment operation commences or is to commence. The deployment may be movement of troops, cargo, weapon systems, or a combination of these elements using any or all types of transport. The letter "C" will be the only one used to denote the above. The highest command or headquarters responsible for coordinating the planning will specify the exact meaning of C-day within the aforementioned definition. The command or headquarters directly responsible for the execution of the operation, if other than the one coordinating the planning, will do so in light of the meaning specified by the highest command or headquarters coordinating the planning. b. D-day. The unnamed day on which a particular operation commences or is to commence. c. F-hour. The effective time of announcement by the Secretary of Defense to the Military Departments of a decision to mobilize Reserve units. d. H-hour. The specific hour on D-day at which a particular operation commences. e. L-hour. The specific hour on C-day at which a deployment operation commences or is to commence. f. M-day. The term used to designate the unnamed day on which full mobilization commences or is due to commence. g. N-day. The unnamed day an active duty unit is notified for deployment or redeployment. h. R-day. Redeployment day. The day on which redeployment of major combat, combat support, and combat service support forces begins in an operation. I. S-day. The day the President authorizes Selective Reserve callup (not more than 200,000). j. T-day. The effective day coincident with Presidential declaration of National Emergency and authorization of partial mobilization (not more than 1,000,000 personnel exclusive of the 200,000 callup). k. W-day. Declared by the National Command Authorities, W-day is associated with an adversary decision to prepare for war (unambiguous strategic warning). (JP 1-02)

total obligation authority or obligation authority. The sum of (1) budget authority conferred for a given fiscal year, (2) balances of amounts brought forward from prior years that remain available for obligation, and (3) amounts authorized to be credited to a specific fund or account during that year. (adapted from the GAO glossary)

transmittal document. A general term for the document published at the conclusion of the concept development phase of deliberate planning to convey the CINCís concept of operations, concept of support, and other planning information to the JPEC. The format is not specified, but may take one of several forms: an outline plan, a letter of instruction (LOI), a plan directive, or a draft OPLAN. (adapted from Joint Pub 5-02.1)

transportation closure. (DOD) The actual arrival date of a specified movement requirement at port of debarkation. (JP 1-02)

transportation component command. (DOD) The three component commands of USTRANSCOM: Air Force Air Mobility Command, Navy Military Sealift Command, and Army Military Traffic Management Command. Each transportation component command remains a major command of its parent Service and continues to organize, train, and equip its forces as specified by law. Each transportation component command also continues to perform Service-unique missions. Also called TCC. (JP 1-02)

transportation system. (DOD) All the land, water, and air routes and transportation assets engaged in the movement of US forces and their supplies during peacetime training, conflict, or war, involving both mature and contingency theaters and at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels of war. (JP 1-02)

type unit. (DOD) A type of organizational or functional entity established within the Armed Forces and uniquely identified by a five-character, alphanumeric code called a unit type code. (JP 1-02)

type unit data file. (DOD) A file that provides standard planning data and movement characteristics for personnel, cargo, and accompanying supplies associated with type units. (JP 1-02)

Unified Action Armed Forces. (DOD) A publication setting forth the policies, principles, doctrines, and functions governing the activities and performance of the Armed Forces of the United States when two or more Military Departments or Service elements thereof are acting together. Also called UNAAF. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

unified command. (DOD) A command with a broad continuing mission under a single commander and composed of significant assigned components of two or more Military Departments, and which is established and so designated by the President, through the Secretary of Defense with the advice and assistance of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Also called unified combatant command. See also combatant command; subordinate command. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

Unified Command Plan. (DOD) The document, approved by the President, which sets forth basic guidance to all unified combatant commanders; establishes their missions, responsibilities, and force structure; delineates the general geographical area of responsibility for geographic combatant commanders; and specifies functional responsibilities for functional combatant commanders. Also called UCP. See also combatant command; combatant commander. (Approved by JMTGM# 076-2864-94)

unit designation list. (DOD) A list of actual units by unit identification code designated to fulfill requirements of a force list. (JP 1-02)

unit identification code. (DOD) A six-character, alphanumeric code that uniquely identifies each Active, Reserve, and National Guard unit of the Armed Forces. Also called UIC. (JP 1-02)

unit line number. (DOD) A seven-character, alphanumeric field that uniquely describes a unit entry (line) in a Joint Operation Planning and Execution System time-phased force and deployment data. Also called ULN. (JP 1-02)

unit type code. (DOD) A five-character, alphanumeric code that uniquely identifies each type unit of the Armed Forces. Also called UTC. (JP 1-02)

unit-related equipment and supplies. All equipment and supplies that are assigned to a specific unit or that are designated as accompanying supplies. The logistics dimensions of these items are contained in the TUCHA standard reference file. (JOPES Userís

Manual)

US Country Team. (DOD) The senior, in-country, United States coordinating and supervising body, headed by the Chief of the United States diplomatic mission, and composed of the senior member of each represented United States department or agency, as desired by the Chief of the US diplomatic mission. (Approved by JMTGM#

076-2864-94)

US Transportation Command coordinating instructions. (DOD) Instructions of the US Transportation Command that establish suspense dates for selected members of the joint planning and execution community to complete updates to the operation plan data base. Instructions will ensure the target date movement requirements will be validated and available for scheduling. (JP 1-02)

validate. (DOD) Execution procedure used by combatant command components, supporting combatant commanders, and providing organizations to confirm to the supported commander and US Transportation Command that all the information records in a time-phased force and deployment data not only are error-free for automation purposes, but also accurately reflect the current status, attributes, and availability of units and requirements. Unit readiness, movement dates, passengers, and cargo details should be confirmed with the unit before validation occurs. (JP 1-02)

visual information projection terminal. A remote work station that allows a user to communicate through a keyboard and a cathode-ray tube (CRT) with a computer. (JOPES Userís Manual)

war. A state of undeclared or declared armed hostile action characterized by the sustained use of armed force between nations or organized groups within a nation involving regular and irregular forces in a series of connected military operations or campaigns to achieve vital national objectives. (Joint Pub 5-00.1)

warning order. (DOD, NATO) 1. A preliminary notice of an order or action which is to follow. (DOD) 2. A crisis action planning directive issued by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that initiates the development and evaluation of courses of action by a supported commander and requests that a commanderís estimate be submitted. 3. A planning directive that describes the situation, allocates forces and resources, establishes command relationships, provides other initial planning guidance, and initiates subordinate unit mission planning. (Approved by JMTGM# 094-0556-94)

WARNING ORDER (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff). (DOD) A crisis action planning directive issued by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that initiates the development and evaluation of courses of action by a supported commander and requests that a commanderís estimate be submitted. See also warning order. (JP 1-02)