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A-7 Corsair II

Built originally on the airframe of the F-8U Crusader, the A-7 underwent a number of modifications since its 1965 introduction. The A-7 Corsair II, which is retired, was used by TAC for close air support attack missions.

The A-7E was the final fleet version of the A-7. After more than two decades of service, however, it was replaced by the F/A-18 Hornet.The A-7E had a 20mm gun and can carry payloads of up to 15,000 pounds of bombs and missiles. Eight ordnance stations were available. A-7E Corsair IIs were part of the two-carrier battle group that conducted a joint strike on selected Libyan terrorist-related targets in 1986. Together with carrier-based F/A-18s, A-7s used anti-radiation missiles to neutralize Libyan air defenses.

F/A-18s replaced A-7Es in the carrier air wing mix. The last two squadrons transitioned in FY 1992. Replacing A-7s with F/A-18s gave operational commanders more flexibility by allowing them to employ the F/A-18s in either the fighter or attack role. Also, a smaller number of aircraft (85) are needed in an F/A-18 equipped carrier air wing than in an A-7E equipped carrier air wing (94).

Specifications

Contractor Ling-Temco-Vought (Prime, now Northrop Grumman Corp.)
Power Plant Single Allison/Rolls Royce TF41-A-400 non-afterburning turbofan engine with a static thrust rating of 15,000 pounds
Accommodations
  • A-7E Pilot only
  • TA-7C Two seats
  • Performance (A-7E/TA/7C)
  • Maximum speed at 20,000 feet Mach .94
  • Range greater than 1,900 nautical miles
  • Avionics & Countermeasures
  • APQ-126 multi-mode nav/attack radar [Texas Instruments]
  • AVQ-7 raster HUD
  • ASN-91 INS, ASN-190 Doppler navigation system
  • ASU-99 projected map display

  • ALR-45 RWR
  • ALR-50 SAM warning system [Magnavox]
  • ALQ-126 ECM [ Sanders]
  • APR-43 tactical radar warning system [Loral]

  • ALQ-119 ECM [Westinghouse]
  • ALQ-131 ECM [Westinghouse]
  • ALQ-123 IR countermeasures [Xerox]
  • ALQ-126 DECM [Sanders]
  • ALQ-162 tactical communications jammer [Eaton AIL]
  • ALQ-162 radar jammer Northrup
  • Armament (A-7E/TA-7C)
  • One internally mounted M61A1 20 mm six barrel cannon
  • Six wing pylons
  • Two fuselage launch stations
  • Pylons can carry a large single weapon, multiple racks capable of six weapons per rack, or triple racks with three weapons per rack.
  • Can carry 15,000 pounds of payload
  • Compatible with practically all first line ordnance used by the U.S./USAF/NATO.
  • Mission and Capabilities
  • Modern, sophisticated, integrated, highly versatile airborne weapon system platform
  • Capable of performing a variety of search, surveillance, and attack missions
  • Can carry four externally wing-mounted 300 gallon fuel tanks, coupled with a variety of ordnance on remaining stations.
  • Can conduct in-flight refueling operations
  • Capable of transferring more than 12,000 pounds of fuel
  • Fully integrated digital navigation/weapon delivery system is common to all current USN/USAF attack aircraft.
  • Avionics system—which is based on state-of-the-art electronics, digital computing techniques, and an automation philosophy—provides unparalleled mission effectiveness and flexibility.
  • The Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) capability means the A-7's night attack accuracy is equivalent to day attack accuracy.
  • Consistently capable of delivering bombs with an accuracy of less than 10 mils Circular Error Probable (CEP) and guns at less than 5 mils CEP.
  • During Desert Storm, demonstrated more than 95% operational readiness and did not miss a single combat sortie.
  • Has flown more than 120,000 combat sorties and provided unprecedented response in Vietnam, Libya, Grenada, Panama, and Desert Storm.
  • Survivability is enhanced via armor plating in critical areas and a state-of-the art DECM.
  • Modernized with a new solid-state rate gyro assembly in the Automatic Flight Control System and a wing enhancement program that virtually eliminates flight hours as a constraint for measuring aircraft service life.
  • Average scheduled/unscheduled direct maintenance man hours per flight hour is 11.
  • External Dimensions:

    Wing Span 11.8m      
    Wing span over missiles         
    Wing chord: at root 4.72m 
    Wing chord: at tip 1.18m        
    Wing aspect ratio 4        
    Width, wings folded 7.24m        
    Length overall 14.06m     
    Height overall 4.90m      
    Tailplane span 5.52m     
    Distance between fin tips         
    Wheel track 2.90m       
    Wheelbase         

    Areas:

    Wings, gross 34.83m2   
    Ailerons (total) 1.85m2        
    Leading-edge flaps (total) 3.46m2        
    Trailing-edge flaps (total) 4.04m2        
    Vert Tail Services (total)        
    Horz Tail Services (total)    
    Tailerons (total)         

    Weights and Loadings:

    Weight empty 8,676kg      
    Maximum fuel weight
    Maximum external stores load         
    Take off weight (normal)  

    Fighter mission

            

    Attack mission

            

    Maximum

            
    Maximum wing loading (attack mission)         

    Performance (At Maximum Takeoff Weight of 19,050kg):

    Max level speed @ S.L. 600 knots     
    Max speed, intermediate power         
    Approach speed         
    T-O run @ maximum take-off weight of 1,705m  
    Minimum wind over deck:

    Launching

            

    Recovery

            
    Combat radius, interdiction, hi-lo-lo-hi         
    Combat endurance, CAP 150 nm
    from aircraft carrier
            
    Ferry range, unrefueled w/max internal & external fuel 2,485nm       

    Sources and Resources



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