CH-47 Chinook


OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

FOR THE

IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER

(CH-47D SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP))

(CARDS NO: 05031)

Change 1

10 July 1997

1. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY.

a. Mission Area. The Improved Cargo Helicopter (ICH) will provide continued support, coverage, and sustainment for Maneuver, Fire Support, Air Defense, and Mobility and Survivability mission areas. The primary mission of the ICH is transportation of ground forces, class III and V supplies, and battle critical cargo in support of all future contingencies. The geographical mission area for the ICH is worldwide, anywhere aviation or ground operations are being conducted by U.S. Forces. Through its speed and agility, the ICH will meet time sensitive transport requirements for urgently needed armed forces, equipment, and supplies, that are not otherwise rapidly available from ground transportation systems. Missions will be conducted during day and night, adverse weather, and extreme environments across the range of operations from support of friendly host nations, primary regional conflicts, and high intensity battle.

b. Type of System Proposed. The Army has a critical need for sustainment of the performance capabilities of the CH-47D cargo helicopter to meet existing and future operational requirements with a corresponding reduction in operating and support (O&S) costs associated with the employment of the current aging fleet. A sustainment program concentrating on increasing the life of dynamic and electronic components, reducing maintenance man-hour requirements, and introducing an avionics architecture compatible with the digitized battlefield envisioned for Force XXI are proposed to meet the Armyís needs in this mission area. The ICH shall be a CH-47D cargo helicopter system which provides enhanced mission effectiveness by maintaining the positive aspects of the current fleet while increasing deployability, versatility, survivability, and supportability, and increasing operator and maintainer efficiency.

c. Operational Concept. As the world order is changing, so is the posture of U.S. forces. Our nationís military strategy for land warfare is transforming from reliance on forward deployed forces, reinforced from the U.S., to a CONUS based deployable and versatile force, able to achieve a decisive victory. Military strength reductions, combined with recent experiences in contingency operations, compel development of a smaller, quality force oriented on rapid response contingency operations. This force must be of the highest quality, able to deploy rapidly, fight, sustain themselves, and win quickly with minimum casualties when deployed. The ICH will be called upon to provide essential combat support and combat service support to sustain future contingency operations. The pace of the Desert Storm ground campaign provided a glimpse of the future. Army operations will be characterized by relatively brief, intense battles, fought far from support bases. Timely support will be critical to success.

d. Support Concept. ICH will be fielded using the existing three level maintenance structure for the CH-47D. No major changes are planned to support the aircraft. Aviation unit maintenance (AVUM), aviation intermediate maintenance (AVIM), and depot level maintenance support is provided for the current CH-47D and will also be provided for the ICH.

e. Mission Need Statement (MNS) Summary. The United States Army, Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), Aerial Cargo Transport (ACT) MNS was validated by the Department of the Army. The ACT MNS addressed both the short-term cargo aircraft requirement (ICH) and the long-term requirement (the Joint Transport Rotorcraft). The Department of the Army's validation of the ACT MNS recognized the mission need for medium/heavy cargo transport, but deferred new start program funding due to current fiscal constraints. However, direction was provided to address the short-term requirement in a revised CH-47D Operational Requirements Document. The Total Army Analysis, TAA-03, requirement for 488 cargo helicopters is filled by 431 CH-47Ds. The plan is to produce 300 ICHís and production of the JTR (Joint Transport Rotorcraft) to fill the TAA-03 requirement.

2. THREAT. The ICH, operating on a non-linear battlefield, will face a wide variety of threats. The primary threats will be from anti-aircraft artillery, especially self-propelled, radar-directed systems, and close-combat, man-portable and vehicle-launched surface-to-air missiles(SAM). One of the most effective threat systems is the hybrid or combined air defense system(CADS) which combines both guns and SAMs on a mobile platform. As with other helicopters operating at or near the forward line of troops (FLOT), the ICH will contend with additional threats from tanks and light armored vehicles, particularly those with extended range capability provided by anti-tank guided missiles and SAMs. Armed helicopters and close-support fixed-wing aircraft will engage the ICH as targets-of-opportunity. Anti-helicopter mines, fire support weapons, anti-sensor laser weapons, and directed energy weapons are other threats to the ICH. The ICH will also be exposed to enemy threats employed in friendly rear areas such as man-portable SAMs and small arms weapons. While the former Soviet Union weapons are still the dominate presence in military force arsenals worldwide, the conventional arms proliferation will expose the ICH to a diverse array of threat systems. The global arms market is fostering an environment where lesser developed countries may acquire advanced weapon systems. Advances in technology are expected to result in more capable air defense weapons as well as non-air defense weapons with inherent capability against helicopters like the ICH. Many of these advancements will be available as subsystem upgrades for older weapons. The most important change in the spectrum of threat will be the increase in lethality of all conflicts resulting from the proliferation of technology and weapons to the least sophisticated forces. Although the threat from nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) weapons has diminished, many countries have the capability to employ NBC weapons against US forces.

3. SHORTCOMINGS OF EXISTING SYSTEMS. The current CH-47D

cargo helicopter fleet is unable to support the requirements of a primarily CONUS based, contingency force. The operational capability that is critical to support this wide range of contingencies is not provided by current cargo helicopter systems without improvements. Existing cargo helicopters performed admirably in the past; however, the current capability erodes with an aging fleet. The first CH-47D aircraft will reach their service life goal of 20 years in 2002 (Note: The CH-47D was remanufactured from CH-47 A, B, and C model aircraft). Continually increasing maintenance man-hour per flight hour rates, resulting from years of high use, are adversely impacting unitsí ability to maintain the fleet to Army standard. Increases in O&S costs, cargo weight, range requirements, operational tempo, emphasis on rapid self-deployability, and threat anti-aircraft capabilities have reduced the effectiveness of the CH-47D fleet. The CH-47D cannot communicate in the Army Force XXI digital battlefield network without new equipment.

4. CAPABILITIES REQUIRED.

a. System Performance.

 

(1) Self-Deployability. The ICH must be capable of worldwide self-deployment. It must self-deploy over all routes listed in FM 1-109, "Aviation Self-deployment Planning" (longest leg 1,056 nautical miles (NM)), using integral and auxiliary fuel with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve. The longest leg required is 1,056 nautical miles* (reference FM 1-111) using integral and auxiliary fuel with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve. Desired capability of 1,260 nautical miles using integral and auxiliary fuel with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve.

(2) Versatility. The ICH must be capable of operating from improved surfaces, unimproved surfaces, and seaborne facilities. The system must be capable of flying day or night and in weather or battlefield conditions less than Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) (i.e., in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC)).

(a) The ICH must provide the capability to accomplish the following missions at 4,000 ft. pressure altitude, 95įF ambient conditions with at least 200 feet per minute vertical rate of climb takeoff at maximum power and landing with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve:

1 Transport externally and/or internally 16,000 lbs of cargo in addition to the aircraft crew of four and their gear for a required unrefueled combat radius of 50 nautical miles (nm)*, with a 100 nm radius desired. Standard loads include the high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV) and 463L type pallets.

2 Transport internally 31 combat equipped troops (240 lbs each) for a required unrefueled combat radius of 100 nautical miles (nm)*, with a desired capability of 44 troops for 150 nm.

(b) An improved electronic architecture having reduced vulnerability and improved RAM characteristics is required. It should be compliant with Army Technical Architecture (ATA) or have provisions for migration to ATA. The design must consider shipboard compatibility. It must be able to be equipped with specific capabilities to be viable on the digitized battlefield. It must have growth potential to accept emerging technologies in the areas of navigation, survivability, situational awareness, mission planning, information display, and digital input. The following are minimum threshold values .requirements:

1 The ICH must have clear and secure modes of communications in the VHF-AM (voice), VHF-FM (voice and data), UHF-AM (voice and data), HF (voice and data) bands. The architecture must allow for Global Positioning System (GPS) timing input connections, data interoperability with Army Standards (MIL-STD-188-220 & VMF), system compatible intercom system, and expansibility/flexibility for emerging communications media to maintain compatibility with the digital battlefield. Desired Objective capabilities include the direct transfer of digital information into aircraft systems following operator confirmation (i.e., entry of new navigation points) and a wireless intercom system for the flight engineer/crew chief.

2 The ICH navigation suite must have a Global Positioning System (GPS), a backup system (non-GPS), physical position identification with and without GPS operating, initialization capability (navigation and communications systems) through a data transfer system (DTS) compatible with the aviation mission planning system (AMPS), provisioning for a Mode-S Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) transponder, and provisioning for a backup navigation system not reliant on outside updates during flight for long range, over-water deployment. The navigation suite will incorporate a hover hold system as an objective desired capability.

3 The ICH electronic architecture must contain provisions for AMPS compatible data storage, data input, and data processing to accept a multi-function display (MFD) (i.e., to facilitate digital map and overlay capability). Desired Objective capabilities include processor upgrade flexibility and inclusion of flight management processing functions.

4 The ICH must provide text message display with day/night/NVG visibility, and processing growth and space provisions for the inclusion of future MFD technology Multi-Functional Display (MFD) type technology on the instrument panel. Desired RequiredThreshold capabilities must include a multi-fuction color graphic display and the display of Force XXI Battle Command Brigade & Below (FBCB2) tactical and situational awareness information. MFD type technology with a highly desired provision for a color graphics and processing capability to display Force XXI Battle Command Brigade & Below (FBCB2) tactical and situational awareness information.

5 The architecture must be compatible with current night vision systems.

6 The aircraft survivability equipment suite will provide the capabilities of the current system and provide growth capability to accept and integrate emerging systems (i.e., the Suite of Integrated Infrared Countermeasures and the Suite of Integrated Radio Frequency Countermeasures).

7 The architecture will have growth provisions to accept and integrate the emerging Digital Source Collector (DSC) system.

(c) Provide efficient engine air filtration to permit extended operations consistent with mission profiles in a desert environment while maintaining the capabilities required in paragraph 4a(2)(a).

b. Logistics and Readiness.

(1) Logistics.

(a) The Army shall maintain the ICH using the same three levels of maintenance (AVUM, AVIM, and Depot) the CH-47D uses.

(b) New assemblies shall be easily removed and replaced using a minimum number of tools and hardware. Layering of components/modules shall be minimized. Potential damage as a result of removal of components/modules shall be minimized. The use of captive hardware will be maximized. Preventive and scheduled maintenance requirements will be no greater than those for the CH-47D.

(c) The ICH must be recoverable by air, using standard Army aviation aerial recovery equipment, and ground methods.

(d) Stowage for crew equipment aboard the aircraft is desired. Equipment stowage must not reduce crashworthiness or aircrew safety.

(2) Reliability and Maintainability (R&M). The values reflected below are the R&M operational thresholds for the ICH.

(a) Mean Time Between Mission Abort (MTBMA) of 44 flight hours (48 flight hours desired).

(b) Mean Time Between Mission Affecting Failure (MTBMAF) of 7.0 flight hours (7.6 flight hours desired).

(c) Mean Time Between Essential Maintenance Action (MTBEMA) of 3.3 flight hours (3.5 flight hours desired).

(d) Mean Time Between Unscheduled Maintenance Action (MTBUMA) of 0.79 flight hours (0.86 flight hours desired).

(e) Total maintenance ratio of 9.8 maintenance man-hours per flight hour (9.2 maintenance man-hours per flight hour desired).

(f) Unscheduled maintenance ratio of 5.1 maintenance man-hours per flight hour (4.5 maintenance man-hours per flight hour desired).

c. Other System Characteristics.

(1) Environment. The ICH must successfully perform its missions worldwide across the same spectrum of climates as the present CH-47D(IAW AR70-38), weather and other environmental factors. The ICH may be employed worldwide. The system must continue to operate after encountering NBC contaminants and standard Army aviation decontaminants.

(2) Safety. The design and construction of ICH improvements must minimize safety risks to operators, maintainers, and support personnel.

(3) Design growth. Design growth must be provided for all improved aircraft systems. ICH must have the capability to incorporate emerging technologies which are projected to mature during ICH's life cycle. The design should place strong emphasis on providing system software processing capabilities for future growth.

(4) Security.

(a) No classified data, information, or material will be permanently stored in ICH on-board systems. Systems must possess the capability to rapidly zeroize classified data stored in-flight in the event of an emergency.

(b) Secure voice communications and data transmissions are required.

5. Program Support.

a. Maintenance Planning.

(1) The ICH shall be compatible with and maintainable through the Standard Army Supply System and the Standard Army Maintenance System. No new maintenance levels or structures will be required.

(2) The avionics architecture shall place strong emphasis on built-in-test capability.

b. Support Equipment.

(1) The ICH shall be operated and maintained with minimal tools and ground support equipment. ICH shall make maximum use of the new aircraft tool system (NATS) and projected standard Army aviation tools and support equipment.

(2) Peculiar ground support equipment (PGSE) shall be minimized. No mainframe Automatic Test Equipment (ATE) shall be required at unit level to achieve supportability goals. The ICH shall maximize use of the integrated family of test equipment (IFTE) for needed ATE. Unit level maintenance shall not be limited by the accessibility of support equipment or ATE.

c. Human System Integration. The system shall be designed to provide Soldier Survivability. The system shall allow operator, maintainer, and support personnel, representative of the user population (5th percentile female through 95th percentile male), the capability to effectively operate and maintain the system while using and/or wearing appropriate protective clothing and combat gear (e.g., cold weather clothing, mission oriented protective posture (MOPP) IV clothing, survival vest).

(1) Training Concept.

(a) The operator, maintainer, and support (OMS) personnel training shall be of sufficient quality and quantity to duplicate the training provided by the existing CH-47D OMS courses without increasing required training course lengths or manpower. In-flight training hours for the AQC shall not exceed those in the current course. In-flight training hours for individual skill sustainment shall not exceed the current allotted time.

(b) Embedded training for aircraft normal and emergency procedures, systems operations, and mission execution shall be considered when designing the ICH avionics suite. Embedded training capabilities must not adversely affect mission performance or safety of flight nor degrade system maintainability or component life.

(c) The training program shall be developed concurrently with the aircraft improvement development and in accordance with (IAW) the Systems Approach to Training (SAT) process. It shall include changes to all aircraft and training device (simulators, maintenance training devices, and part task trainers) hardware, software, courseware, technical and training documentation and manuals, consumables, and facilities necessary to train both active and reserve component OMS personnel at all skill levels to fully mission-ready proficiency. It shall train 100 percent of the approved critical tasks identified for OMS personnel; shall be available for Instructor and Key Personnel Training (IKPT); and shall be fully tested, validated, verified, and ready for training in the training base at Initial Operational Capability (IOC). The training program shall remain concurrent with the systems throughout their life cycle.

(d) Qualification training shall be conducted at a resident training base. During fielding, operator transition training shall be conducted in an Aircraft Qualification Course (AQC). Instructor pilot and maintenance test pilot training shall be conducted as separate courses.

(e) Sustainment training shall be designed and developed IAW appropriate training doctrine to support sustainment and continuation training for qualified CH-47 aircrew personnel worldwide.

(f) Training shall be designed, developed, and implemented to support Doctrine and Tactics Training (DTT), Instructor and Key Personnel Training (IKPT), test player training, exportable training, and professional development training. Qualification training will be accomplished through resident training and initial unit collective training will be accomplished through organizational training.

(2) Manpower/Force Structure. The system shall not require an increase in crew size, maintenance manpower, or support personnel requirements. The ICH shall be supportable and maintainable within the current aviation force structure.

(3) Human Factors Engineering.

(a) All systems requirements defined in the ORD and system specifications shall be met with the soldier-in-the-loop. Overall design of the ICH shall promote ease of maintenance through ready accessibility of assemblies and subassemblies for servicing, maintenance, or removal and replacement. Design of controls, displays, panel layouts, and operating procedures shall provide smooth, expeditious, error-free operation of the ICH and its mission equipment; minimize fatigue; and eliminate high requirement drivers for training. The crew stations of the ICH must accommodate the representative user population for accomplishment of the full range of crew mission functions.

(b) System Safety. Hazards associated with materiel shortcomings, system performance, or predictable human error will be identified and eliminated or reduced to acceptable levels through engineering design and manufacturing. The existing CH-47D shall establish the baseline risk level.

(4) Health Hazards. Health hazards which may be associated with mechanical forces or pressures, toxic substances, ionizing or non-ionizing radiation, noise, or other emissions from the ICH, either in its operation, maintenance, or support activities will be identified and eliminated or reduced to acceptable levels as prescribed by appropriate Government standards (including U.S. Army aeromedical standards). The system must present no environmental hazards above the existing CH-47D.

d. Computer Resources. The ICH must be supported by existing and/or planned common computer resources. The ICH must be compatible with the Unit Level Logistics System.

e. Other Logistics Considerations. The ICH must use the established Army three level retail supply system. Commonality and interchangeability must be maximized.

(1) Facility and Shelter Requirements. No ICH unique fixed facilities or shelters shall be required.

(2) Special Packaging, Handling, Storage and Transportation. Packaging, handling, storage, and transportation must meet standard Army requirements and require no special, environmentally hazardous materials or procedures.

(3) Data Requirements. No ICH unique data requirements have been identified.

(4) Publications. It is required that the ICH have, to the maximum extent possible, a digital technical publications system. This system includes interactive electronic technical manuals and their delivery device.

f. Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence. The ICH should be designed with the growth potential to accept command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence systems which provide operations in the Department of Defense voice and data communications spectrum and have the capability to operate with approved communications and secure transmission equipment. The objective design should be able to take advantage of situational awareness information available within the Department of Defense.

g. Transportation and Basing.

(1) Transportation. The system must be capable of self deployment worldwide, IAW FM 1-109, under instrument meteorological conditions. The system must be transportable via air and sea transport assets. The ICH must have military existing lifting and tiedown provisions. The ICH must be recoverable by cargo helicopter (US Army CH-47) using the standard Army aerial recovery kit.

(2) Basing.

(a) Operational. The ICH will replace existing CH-47D assets world wide and use the same facilities. No new specific operational basing or facilities requirements over those now in use have been identified.

(b) Individual. Individual ICH operator and maintainer training will occur at the current training sites for the CH-47D. Modification and/or new construction to basefields, stagefields, operator and maintainer training facilities and storage space will not be required.

h. Standardization, Interoperability, and Commonality (SIC). System development will maximize shipboard compatibility. The aircraft must operate with JP-8 fuel.

i. Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Support. None required.

j. Environmental Support. ICH has no unique aviation weather, astrophysical, or geophysical requirements.

6. Force Structure. Force total requires 488 aircraft of which 360 are TO&E and the remainder are other than Regular Army. Currently there are 467 in the inventory.

7. Schedule Considerations. The proposed schedule for the ICH includes a Milestone I/III decision in Feb 97, contract award in Jul 97, Engineering and Manufacturing Development 4th quarter FY 97 through 4th quarter FY 01, with first delivery in 4th quarter FY 02. First unit equipped and initial operational capability dates and criteria have not been identified.

 

 

ANNEXES

A - Rationale

B - Operational Mode Summary/Mission Profiles

C - Coordination

D - Funding Implications

E - Training Support

 

 

 

 

* Key Performance Parameter - A requirementThreshold value or characteristic that is so significant that failure to meet the threshold by milestone III will be cause for the concept or system selection to be reevaluated or the program to be terminated.

ANNEX A

RATIONALE TO THE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

FOR THE IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER

(CH-47D SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP))

 

1. CAPABILITIES REQUIRED.

a. System Performance.

(1) Self-Deployability. The ICH must be capable of worldwide self-deployment. It must self-deploy over all routes listed in FM 1-109, "Aviation Self-Deployment Planning" (longest leg 1,056 nautical miles (NM)), The longest leg required is 1,056 nautical miles* (reference FM 1-111) using integral and auxiliary fuel with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve. DesiredAn objective capability of 1,260 nautical miles using integral and auxiliary fuel with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve.

Rationale: The ICH maintains the CH-47D requirement to self-deploy, with added emphasis based on a Force Projection Army. FM 1-109 1-111 defines provides guidance for Army self-deployment routes. The non-availability of refuel locations along deployment routes necessitates the prescribed range requirement.

(2) Versatility. The ICH must be capable of operating from improved surfaces, unimproved surfaces, and seaborne facilities. The system must be capable of flying day or night and in weather or battlefield conditions less than Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) (i.e., in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC)).

Rationale: The ICH may be employed from these locations using current and projected doctrine. The requirement to operate from seaborne facilities does not necessitate full shipboard qualification, but does require that shipboard compatibility be considered during the development of materiel changes to the CH-47D. The ICH may encounter conditions of reduced visibility during any phase of aircraft operations. The aircraft must be equipped for safe operation/recovery in any navigable airspace.

(a) The ICH must provide the capability to accomplish the following missions at 4,000 ft. pressure altitude, 95įF ambient conditions with at least 200 feet per minute vertical rate of climb takeoff at maximum power and landing with at least a 30 minute fuel reserve:

Rationale: 4000 ft. pressure altitude and 950 F constitute standard high/hot (desert) conditions for aviation assets. A 200 feet per minute rate of climb ensures safe departure power availability. A 30 minute fuel reserve allows an acceptable safety margin at end of mission.

1 Transport externally or internally 16,000 lbs of cargo in addition to the aircraft crew and their gear for a required unrefueled combat radius of 50 nautical miles (nm)*, with a 100 nm radius desired. Standard loads include the high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV) and 463L type pallets.

Rationale: External and internal load handling capabilities allow for mission flexibility. The 16,000 lb. cargo requirement insures the capability to carry such loads as the current M198 Howitzer (15,780 lbs) and the future scout vehicle (16,000 lbs). The 50 nm range requirement is derived from a combination of the technically feasible, cost effective capability of the airframe and projected mission requirements. Missions over longer distances may be planned using auxiliary fuel or refuel stops along the route. The 100 nm desired range will minimize fuel considerations in longer missions.

2 Transport internally 31 combat equipped troops (240 lbs each) for a required unrefueled combat radius of 100 nautical miles (nm)*, with a capability of 44 troops for a 150 nm radius desired.

Rationale: A 31 combat equipped troop capacity maintains the CH-47Ds current capability and 44 will increase to that of the MH-47E. The range requirement meets the equipment carrying capability addressed in the paragraph above to deliver both equipment and troops to the same location.

(b) An improved electronic architecture having reduced vulnerability and improved RAM characteristics is required. The architecture design must consider shipboard compatibility. The ICH must be able to be equipped with specific capabilities to be viable on the digitized battlefield. Growth potential to accept emerging technologies in the areas of navigation, survivability, situational awareness, mission planning, information display, and digital input must be considered in the design of the architecture. The following are minimum requirements:

Rationale: Specific requirements addressed in paragraphs below. Basic philosophy for the electronic architecture is to have a flexible, dependable suite able to adapt to the digitized battlefield. The architecture should be no more vulnerable to shipboard interference than the current system.

1 The ICH must have clear and secure modes of communications in the VHF-AM (voice), VHF-FM (voice and data), UHF-AM (voice and data), HF (voice and data) bands. The architecture must allow for Global Positioning System (GPS) timing input connections, data interoperability with Army Standards (MIL-STD-188-220 & VMF), system compatible intercom system, and expansibility/flexibility for emerging communications media to maintain compatibility with the digital battlefield. Desired capabilities include the direct transfer of digital information into aircraft systems following operator confirmation (i.e., entry of new navigation points) and a wireless intercom system for the flight engineer/crew chief.

Rationale: Communications capabilities consistent with current frequency bands is required. The system must conform to GPS and data interoperability standards to be viable on the future battlefield. Manual input of digital information should meet low volume demands of the developing network; however, as the volume of digital traffic increases, crew workload will necessitate direct input of digital information. The system must have an intercom system compatible with the new architecture with a wireless system desired for the flight engineer/crew chief to allow ease of movement within and around the aircraft.

2 The ICH navigation suite must have a Global Positioning System (GPS), a backup system (non-GPS), physical position identification with and without GPS operating, initialization capability (navigation and communications systems) through a data transfer system (DTS) compatible with the aviation mission planning system (AMPS), provisioning for a Mode-S Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) transponder, and provisioning for a backup navigation system not reliant on outside updates during flight for long range, over-water deployment. A hover hold system is a desired capability.

Rationale: GPS is the Army standard navigation system. A non-GPS backup is required as a redundant system not reliant on the same source to preclude loss of all systems through the same jamming, interference, or satellite non-availability. Position identification must be available for inclusion in the standard message protocol. The architecture must be compatible with standard AMPS and transponder systems. Provisioning for acceptance of a self-contained navigation system for over-water deployment will ensure a non-corruptible navigation capability. A hover hold system will increase load hook-up safety and efficiency.

3 The ICH electronic architecture must contain growth provisions for AMPS compatible data storage, data input, and data processing to accept a multi-function display (MFD) (i.e., to facilitate digital map and overlay capability). Desired capabilities include processor upgrade flexibility and inclusion of flight management processing functions.

Rationale: Designing these growth capabilities into the system ensure compatibility with the aviation standard planning system. Processor upgrade flexibility ensures growth potential. Availability of flight management processing functions would reduce crew workload and improve efficiency.

4 The ICH must provide text message display with day/night/nvg visibility, and processing growth and space provisions for the inclusion of future MFD technology Multi-Functional Display (MFD) type technology on the instrument panel. Desired Required capabilities must include a multi-fuction color graphic display and the display of Force XXI Battle Command Brigade & Below (FBCB2) tactical and situational awareness information. MFD type technology with a highly desired provision for a color graphics and processing capability to display Force XXI Battle Command Brigade & Below (FBCB2) tactical and situational awareness information.

Rationale: Text message display capability will ensure fundamental digital compatibility. Provisioning for MFD capability ensures growth potential. A multi-function color graphic display and FBCB2 information Multi-Function Display type technology will enable crews to perform flight tasks and battlefield operations safer and more efficiently. A color graphics display and FBCB2 capability would optimize crew situational awareness.

5 The architecture must be compatible with current night vision systems.

Rationale: Changes must not degrade the current capabilities of the CH-47D or its subsystems.

6 The aircraft survivability equipment suite will provide the capabilities of the current system and provide growth capability to accept and integrate emerging systems (i.e., the Suite of Integrated Infrared Countermeasures and the Suite of Integrated Radar Frequency Countermeasures).

Rationale: Changes must not degrade the current capabilities of the CH-47D or its subsystems. The emerging systems are programmed for fielding to the cargo fleet.

7 The architecture will have growth provisions to accept and integrate the emerging Digital Source Collector (DSC) system.

Rationale: The DSC is programmed as the standard flight and maintenance data recorder. Provisioning will allow easy integration when fielded.

(c) Provide efficient engine air filtration to permit extended operations consistent with mission profiles in a desert environment while maintaining performance capabilities out lined in paragraph 4a(2)(a).

Rationale: Past experiences of operating in a desert environment have resulted in restricted operations and reduced engine life.

b. Logistics and Readiness.

(a) Logistics.

(1) The Army shall maintain the ICH using the same three levels of maintenance (AVUM, AVIM, and Depot) the CH-47D uses.

Rationale: No change in the aviation support structure will be required to support the ICH.

(2) New assemblies shall be easily removed and replaced using a minimum number of tools and hardware. Layering of components/modules shall be minimized. Potential damage as a result of removal of components/modules shall be minimized. The use of captive hardware will be maximized. Preventive and scheduled maintenance requirements will be no greater than those for the CH-47D.

Rationale: These requirements facilitate ease of maintenance and minimize the chance of damage. Programmed maintenance will not be an increase over the prior system.

(3) The ICH must be recoverable by air, using standard Army aviation aerial recovery equipment, and ground methods.

Rationale: The system must be recoverable using standard methods and not require new equipment.

(4) Stowage for crew equipment aboard the aircraft is desired. Equipment stowage must not reduce crashworthiness or aircrew safety.

Rationale: Individual and survival equipment must be transported with the crew. The current system does not provide a dedicated area for stowage of crew equipment. Such an area must not adversely affect other systems or aircraft safety

(2) Reliability and Maintainability (R&M). The values reflected below are the R&M operational thresholds for the ICH.

(a) Mean Time Between Mission Abort (MTBMA) of 44 flight hours (48 flight hours desired).

(b) Mean Time Between Mission Affecting Failure (MTBMAF) of 7.0 flight hours (7.6 flight hours desired).

(c) Mean Time Between Essential Maintenance Action (MTBEMA) of 3.3 flight hours (3.5 flight hours desired).

(d) Mean Time Between Unscheduled Maintenance Action (MTBUMA) of 0.79 flight hours (0.86 flight hours desired).

(e) Total maintenance ratio of 9.8 maintenance man-hours per flight hour (9.2 maintenance man-hours per flight hour desired).

(f) Unscheduled maintenance ratio of 5.1 maintenance man-hours per flight hour (4.5 maintenance man-hours per flight hour desired).

Rationale: Specified R&M are needed to ensure a dependable level of ICH performance and to ensure that operating and support (O&S) costs of the current aging fleet of cargo helicopters is reduced. Achieving the R&M thresholds will assure that the user obtains a cargo helicopter with improved R&M performance, thereby improving mission success capability and reducing maintenance manpower required to support the aircraft. Failure to achieve these R&M thresholds may result in R&M performance below that of the current cargo helicopter. R&M operational thresholds and user objectives are documented in the ICH R&M Requirements Rationale (RRR), approved 10 Sep 96.

 

c. Other System Characteristics.

(1) Environment. The ICH must successfully perform its missions worldwide across the same spectrum of climates as the present CH-47D(IAW AR70-38), weather and other environmental factors. The ICH may be employed worldwide. The system must continue to operate after encountering NBC contaminants and standard Army aviation decontaminants.

Rationale: The ICH may be employed worldwide. The system must continue to operate after encountering NBC contaminants and standard Army aviation decontaminants.

(2) Safety. The design and construction of ICH improvements must minimize safety risks to operators, maintainers, and support personnel.

Rationale: The personnel safety implications of any change must be considered.

(3) Design growth. Design growth must be provided for all improved aircraft systems. ICH must have the capability to incorporate emerging technologies which are projected to mature during ICH's life cycle. The design should place strong emphasis on providing system software processing capabilities for future growth.

Rationale: The ICH design must allow for growth to maintain concurrence with battlefield requirements. We must ensure that the ICH does not become obsolete immediately following production.

(4) Security.

(a) No classified data, information, or material will be permanently stored in ICH on-board systems. Systems must possess the capability to rapidly zeroize classified data stored in-flight in the event of an emergency.

Rationale: The ICH design should not increase system security requirements above the CH-47D. Classified mission data must be easily purged during post-mission operations or in the event of a flight emergency.

(b) Secure voice communications and data transmissions are required.

Rationale: Transmission must adhere to the same security requirements placed on other systems within the communications network.

ANNEX B

OPERATIONAL MODE SUMMARY/MISSION PROFILE (OMS/MP)

TO THE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

FOR THE IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER

(CH-47D SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM(SLEP))

 

1. INTRODUCTION. The CH-47 Improved Cargo Helicopter (ICH) will be employed in support of Force XXI Pattern of Operations. Continuous operations in all types of terrain, night (night vision goggles)/adverse weather operations, and battlefield environments will be the norm. The ICH provides a flexible addition to existing logistical transportation systems by providing speed and mobility in the resupply, reconstitution, and movement of time sensitive cargo to areas not located near airfields or normal lines of communication (LOC). The ICH will sustain forward and deep attack forces in addition to its normal combat support (CS)/combat service support (CSS) roles. In the force structure, CH-47 companies are organized in battalion sized units at theater (echelons above corps), corps, and the air assault division.

2. WARTIME OPERATIONAL MODE SUMMARY/MISSION PROFILE (OMS/MP). The wartime operational mode summary (OMS) for the ICH is provided in Table B-1. The mission profiles corresponding to this OMS are provided in Tables B-2 through B-6.

3. PEACETIME OMS/MP. The peacetime flight hours for the ICH is 240 flight hours per year. The peacetime OMS is provided in Table B-7.

4. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS. The ICH will be operated in climatic conditions as shown in Table B-8.

 

TABLE B-1

WARTIME OPERATIONAL MODE SUMMARY (OMS)

ICH, SOUTHWEST ASIA SCENARIO

MISSION

OT

OT+AT

CT

NUMBER OF MISSIONS

TOTAL

OT

TOTAL

OT+AT

TOTAL

CT

Combat Resupply -

Class I, II, IV,

and IX

2.93

21.0

26.4

123

360.4

2587.2

3247.2

Air Assault, Move

Combat Troops and

High Mobility

Multipurpose

Wheeled Vehicles

(HMMWV)

8.58

61.9

77.3

17

145.9

1052.3

1314.1

Move Artillery and

Ammunition

3.60

25.7

32.2

49

176.4

1259.3

1577.8

Transport

Ammunition to

Forward Arming

and Refueling

Point (FARP)

2.98

21.3

26.6

46

137.1

979.8

1223.6

Transport Aviation

Fuel to FARP

2.80

20.2

25.0

56

156.8

1131.2

1400.0

Total Scenario

976.6

7009.8

8762.7

OT - Operating time in hours (time for one mission)

AT - Alert time in hours (system is required to be operable but is not being

operated)

CT - Calendar time in hours (all the time from the beginning of a mission to

its end - includes maintenance time)

 

TABLE B-2

MISSION PROFILE FOR THE ICH

RESUPPLY A MANEUVER BRIGADE - SOUTHWEST ASIA

MISSION TASKS

NUMBER OF OCCURRENCES

OPERATING TIME FOR EACH TASK

TOTAL OPERATING TIME

Ground Run Time

1

10.0

10.0

Low Level Flight

6

3.2, 1.6, 33.3, 33.5, 19.4, 39.9

130.9

Contour Flight

2

5.7, 4.9

10.6

Hover Out-of-Ground Effect

(HOGE)

2

3.0, 1.0

4.0

Load/Unload

2

10.0, 10.0

20.0

Total Minutes

175.5

Total Hours

2.93

TABLE B-3

MISSION PROFILE FOR THE ICH

AIR ASSAULT -- MOVE COMBAT TROOPS AND HMMWVs - SOUTHWEST ASIA

MISSION TASKS

NUMBER OF OCCURRENCES

OPERATING TIME FOR EACH TASK

TOTAL OPERATING TIME

Ground Run Time

4

1 @ 10.0

3 @ 5.0

25.0

Low Level Flight

9

4.7, 55.9, 50.5, 32.4, 69.1, 60.6, 58.7, 32.1, 69.4

433.4

Contour Flight

5

7.7, 6.9, 2.4, 7.7, 6.9

31.6

Unload with aircraft

running

1

5.0

5.0

Load/Unload with aircraft

shutdown

3

20.0, 90.0, 30.0

140.0 *

Refuel

1

20.0

20.0

Total Minutes

515.0

Total Hours

8.58

NOTES:

1. The chart above represents an aircraft that carries two internal loads from

the pickup zone (PZ) to the landing zone (LZ).

2. Load/Unload time designated with an asterisk (*) is not included in flight time.

TABLE B-4

MISSION PROFILE FOR THE ICH

MOVE ARTILLERY (M198 HOWITZER) AND AMMUNITION - SOUTHWEST ASIA

MISSION TASKS

NUMBER OF OCCURRENCES

OPERATING TIME FOR EACH TASK

TOTAL OPERATING TIME

Ground Run Time

2

10.0, 5.0

15.0

Low Level Flight

5

5.1, 29.9, 24.5, 29.9, 29.3

118.7

Contour Flight

5

5.2, 5.3, 2.0, 5.3, 5.3

23.1

Load/Unload

4

3, 2, 14, 10

29.0

Hover In-Ground Effect

(HIGE)

4

2, 1, 2, 1

6.0

HOGE

4

1, 1, 1, 1

4.0

Refuel

1

20.0

20.0

Total Minutes

215.8

Total Hours

3.60

 

 

TABLE B-5

MISSION PROFILE FOR THE ICH

TRANSPORT AMMUNITION TO AN ATTACK HELICOPTER BATTALION FARP

SOUTHWEST ASIA

MISSION TASKS

NUMBER OF OCCURRENCES

OPERATING TIME FOR EACH TASK

TOTAL OPERATING TIME

Ground Run Time

1

10.0

10.0

Low Level Flight

3

4.8, 61.9, 57.7

124.4

Contour Flight

2

6.1, 6.1

12.2

Load/Unload

2

20, 10

30.0

HIGE

2

1.0, 1.0

2.0

Total Minutes

178.6

Total Hours

2.98

NOTE: This chart shows time for an ICH that carries an internal load of ammunition. It could be hauled externally although the cube is large if the missiles are left in the protective packing containers.

TABLE B-6

MISSION PROFILE FOR THE ICH

TRANSPORT AVIATION FUEL TO AN ATTACK HELICOPTER BATTALION FARP

SOUTHWEST ASIA

MISSION TASKS

NUMBER OF OCCURRENCES

OPERATING TIME FOR EACH TASK

TOTAL OPERATING TIME

Ground Run Time

4

10, 2, 2, 2

16.0

Low Level Flight

5

4.8, 34.8, 33.6, 57.7, 4.8

135.7

Contour Flight

2

6.1, 6.1

12.2

HIGE

2

1.0, 1.0

2.0

HOGE

2

1.0, 1.0

2.0

Total Minutes

167.9

Total Hours

2.80

NOTE: This chart shows time for an ICH that carries an external load of four 500 gallon fuel blivets. The time for a FAT COW aircraft would be different because of the time spent on the ground in the FARP doing refueling operations.

TABLE B-7

PEACETIME OPERATIONAL MODE SUMMARY (OMS)

ICH

MISSION

OT

OT+AT

CT

NUMBER OF MISSIONS

TOTAL

OT

TOTAL

OT+AT

TOTAL

CT

Aviator Evaluation

Flights *

1.70

10.7

14.2

10

17.0

107.0

142.0

Training for Army

Training and

Evaluation

Program (ARTEP)

**

3.81

23.4

31.2

9

34.3

210.6

280.8

Unit ARTEP **

3.81

20.2

26.9

3

11.4

60.6

80.7

Mission Support for

Field Training

Exercises (FTX)

**

3.81

23.9

31.9

44

167.7

1051.6

1403.6

Maintenance Test

Flights

1.20

9.5

12.6

8

9.6

76.0

100.8

Total Scenario

240.0

1505.8

2007.9

***

OT - Operating time in hours (time for one mission)

AT - Alert time in hours (system is required to be operable but is not being

operated)

CT - Calendar time in hours (all the time from the beginning of a mission to

its end - includes maintenance time)

NOTES:

* - Evaluation flights are described in the Air-crew Training Manual.

** - Training for the ARTEP, unit ARTEP, and mission support will be the same

as missions listed in the OMS for combat. The weighted average duration

of those missions OT is 3.81 hours.

*** - Represents 251 work days at approximately 8 hours per day.

TABLE B-8

CLIMATIC ENVIRONMENT FOR THE ICH

(AR 70-38)

CLIMATIC DESIGN TYPE

PERCENT OF USE

 

WARTIME

PEACETIME

Hot

Basic

Cold

Severe

38 %

46 %

15 %

1 %

1 %

96 %

2 %

1 %

ANNEX C

COORDINATION TO THE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

FOR THE IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER

(CH-47D SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP))

 

1. The Improved Cargo Helicopter ORD was sent to the offices and organizations listed below for staffing. No organization nonconcurred with the ORD.

Commander-in-Chief

PAC, Fort H.M. Smith, APO San Franciso 96861

U.S. Atlantic Command, Norfolk, VA 23511

U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army, ATTN: AEAGC-FMD, APO AE

09403-0009

Eighth U.S. Army, ATTN: RMJ-MA-VT, APO San Francisco 96301-0009

Transportation Command, Scott AFB, IL 62225-5000

Commandant

U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery School, ATTN: ATSA-CD, Fort

Bliss, TX 79916-0002

U.S. Army Engineer School, ATTN: ATSE-CD, Fort Leonard Wood, MO

65473-5331

U.S. Army Chaplain Center and School, ATTN: ATSC-DCD, Fort

Monmouth, NJ 07703-5000

U.S. Army Field Artillery School, ATTN: ATSF-CD/ATSF-CBL; Fort

Sill, OK 73503-5600

U.S. Army Infantry School, ATTN: ATSH-TS/ATSH-IWC, Fort Benning,

GA 31905-4405

U.S. Army Signal Center and School, ATTN: ATZH-CD, Gordon,

GA 30905-5000

U.S. Army Chemical School, ATTN: ATZN-CM, Fort McClellan, AL

36205-5000

U.S. Army Military Police School, ATTN: ATZN-MP, Fort McClellan,

AL 36205

Commander

U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command, ATTN: ATCL-M, 10500 A

Avenue, Fort Lee, VA 23801-6000

U.S. Army Space Command, ATTN: SCCD-SA-EI, P>0> Box 1500,

Huntsville AL 35807

U.S. Army Special Operations Command, ATTN: SOJ5-R, McDill AFB,

FL 33621-5323

U.S. Army Forces Command, ATTN: AFOP-FC, Fort McPherson, GA

30330-6000

U.S. Army Materiel Command, ATTN: AMCRD-AR/AMCRD-I/AMCAQ-PM,

5001 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22333-0001

Army Information Systems Command, ATTN: AS-OPS, Fort Huachuca,

AZ 85613

U.S. Army Pacific, ATTN: APOP-TR-AV, Fort Shafter, HI 96858-5100

U.S. Army Operational Test and Evaluation Command, ATTN: CSTE-

POD, Part Center IV, 4501 Ford Avenue, Alexandria, VA

22302-1458

INSCOM, ATTN: IAFOR-R, Fort Belvoir, VA, 22060

U.S. Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency, ATTN: MONA-NU, 7500

Backlick-Road, Springfield, VA 22150-3198

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine command, ATTN: ATCD-GI,

Fort Monroe, VA 23851-5000

U.S. Army Safety Center, ATTN: CSSC, Fort Rucker, AL 36362

U.S. Army TMDE Activity, ATTN: AMXTM-LM-A, Redstone Arsenal, AL

35898-5400

U.S. Army Engineering Topographic Laboratory, ATTN: CEETL-ZA,

Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5546

U.S. Army Security Affairs Command, ATTN: AMSAC-MI/AMSAC-T,

5001 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22331-0001

U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, ATTN: AMSTE-TA-OT, APG,

MD 21005-5055

U.S. Army Aviation and Troop Command, ATTN: AMCPM-CH, 4300

Goodfellow Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63120-1798

U.S. Army Edgewood Research Development and Enqineering Center,

ATTN: STRBE-FMD, APG, MD 21005-5000

Military Traffic Management Command, ATTN: MTT-TRG, P.O. Box,

6276, Newport Newt, VA 23606-0276

U.S. Army Armor Center and Fort Knox, ATTN: ATZK-MW, Fort Knox,

KY 40121-5000

USAAVNC, ATTN: ATZQ-ES/TDS/DPT/ATB, Fort Rucker, AL 36362

U.S. Army Intelligence Center, ATTN: ATZS-CDU, Fort Huachuca,

AZ 85613-7000

U.S. Army Training Support Center, ATTN: ATIC-DMR-C, Fort

Eustis, VA 23604-5166

Simulation, Traiting, and Instrumentation Command, ATTN:

AMCPM-TMDE/AMSTI-M, Orlando, FL 32813-5005

U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity, ATTN: AMXSY-L/

AMXSY-SR, APG, MD 21005-5071

U.S. Army Medical Department Center And School, ATTN: HSMC-FC,

Bldg 2000, 1107 Army Blvd, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6123

U.S. Army Materiel Command, ATTN: AMCICT-IM, APG, MD 21005-5000

U.S. Army Laboratory Command, ATTN: AMSLC-TP-TI, 2800 Powder

Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783-1197

U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command, ATTN: SGRD-

ZA, Fort Detrick, MD 21701-5001

U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency, ATTN: MCHB-MO-A, APG,

MD 21010-5000

Director

U.S. Army Concepts Analysis Agency, ATTN: CSCA-RQI, Bethesda, MD

20014-5000

U.S. Marine Corps, CDCWC (Code WF11E), Quantico, VA 21134-2000

Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force, ATTN: XORJ, Washington, DC

20330-5000

Chief of Naval Operations, ATTN: OP-98, Washington, DC 20350-5010

HQDA, ATTN: DAMO-FDR/DAMO-FDV/DALO-SMS/DALO-TSM/SARD-SPO/DAPEPSR/SAFM-CAM/DAMI-FIT/DAEN-ZCN/DASG-HCD-F/NGB-RD/DAAR-FDFI/TAPC-PI, Washington, DC 20310

2. The organizations listed below responded to the USAAVNCís request to review the ICH ORD. The number of comments provided, along with the number of comments rejected for each responding organization are also provided below. It is assumed that those organizations that did not reply concurred with the draft ORD since they were informed that a nonresponse would be considered as a concurrence.

Comnts Comnts Non

Organizations Concur Submit Reject Concur

TRADOC, ATCD-GI X 1

Chemical School

ATZN-CNC-C X

Sig Ctr, ATZH-CDS X

HQDA, DALO-TSM X

DCSLOG X

FA Ctr, ATSF-CBL X

Engineer School

ATSE-CD X

TRANSCOM, TCJ3-OSR X

Tng Spt Ctr

ATIC-DMR-CA X 3

Comnts Comnts Non

Organizations Concur Submit Reject Concur

INSCOM, ASOP-OM X

Mil Traffic Cmd

MTT-TRG X

MP School

ATZN-MP X

IN Ctr, ATZB-CD X

Dismounted Battle-

space BL X

 

HQDA, C of Engineers

DAEN-ZC X

Med Dept & School

MCCS-FCC X

Enviromental Hygiene

MCCS-FCM X 1 1

Combined Arms Spt Cmd

ATCL-MEF X 4

AMSAA, AMXSY-ST X 2

ATCOM, AMSAT-R-NC X 17

Nuclear & Chem Agency

MONA-NU X 3 1

Topo Eng Ctr

CETEC-PD-DR X 2 1

OEC, CSTE-EAV X 4

ODCS-Personnel

TAPC-PLM X 2

MICOM, AMSMI-TMDE X

AF Staff, XORD X 1

USAAVNC DOTDS

ATZQ-TD-GN X 7 1

USAAVNC ATB

ATZQ-ATB-NS X 9 3

USAAVNC DES X

STEAT-CO X 8 3

3. Comments not accepted:

a. USAAVNC, ATTN: STEAT-CO, paragraph 3. Comment: Change to read "The architecture design must be shipboard compatible. Just considering the requirement isnít sufficient if the intent is to operate off Navy ships.

Response: This is a SLEP effort. Shipboard compatible is considered, but not required, to meet the funding available.

b. USAAVNC, ATTN: STEAT-CO, paragraph 4/(b)1. Comment: Suggest they add words that require the capability for use of the Improved Data Modem. This will allow the aircraft to tie into the digital battlefield that is envisioned for Force XXI.

Response: Covered under growth potential to accept emerging technologies.

c. USAAVNC, ATTN: STEAT-CO, paragraph 4/(b)2. Comment: Suggest they add the requirements for a digital map. This will put the Chinook in the same ballgame as the Apache and the Kiowa.

Response: Covered under growth potential to accept emerging technologies.

d. USAAVNC, ATTN: ATZQ-ATB-NS, paragraph 4,a,(2),5. Comment: This time we need to look ahead on night systems. We are suffering consequences right now from the incompatibility of ANVIS and exterior lighting. We need to make a decision now on whether we are going to stay with the current ANVIS spectrynm or go to the OMNIBUS IV tubes which will create yet another challenge.

Response: If there is advanced technologies to improve the CH-47 the must and will be considered and incorporated if they are within the funding criteria.

e. USAAVNC, ATTN: ATZQ-ATB-NS, paragraph 4,b,(2),(a). Comment: The UMARKS is the current recovery kit, and is being tested right now for use with the specra material lines. What weight are we looking at recovering, and how will this relate to our tandem hook limits? We may need to look at increasing the structural capacity in this area.

Response: At this time the official word from Fort Eustis is that the UMARKS is not an official recovery system. The system is in testing and has been certified up to 20,000 lbs. per system kit. The CH-47 would use two system kits for tandem load operations and would be restricted to normal hook limits.

f. USAAVNC, ATTN: ATZQ-ATB-NS, paragraph 4,a,(2),(a),1. Comment: Experience in the desert proved that the D model performed to this level. Should we not be expecting much more than we already have? A weight of 18,000 lbs. might be more realistic considering engine refinements, unless we are assuming some type of air filtration system attached which has a cost in terms of power available.

Response: The lift capability is based on 4,000 ft. pressure altitude and 95 degrees F. ambient conditions with at least 200 feet per minute vertical rate of climb. These are not the conditions the CH-47D operated under in the desert at all times.

g. U.S. Army Topographic Engineering Center, ATTN: CETEC-PD-PR. Comment: Essential comment ADD, "Joint standard Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) digital topographic data (DTD) products shall be used to generate the digital map displays used in combination with tactical, situational awareness and navigational information, directly and without transformation." Rationale: Use of standard DMA-produced DTM is cost-effective and promotes interoperability and standardization within Army systems, and Jointly.

Response: Concur with comment but this should be part of th ORD for the Aviation Mission Planning System (AMPS).

h. USAAVNC, ATTN: ATZQ-ATB-NS, Paragraph 4,a,(2),(b),1. Comment: Communication mentions the use of a wireless intercom system for the flight engineer/crew chief. This implies there is only one additional crewmember besides the pilot and copilot. In current CH-47D units, the combat crew consists of a pilot, copilot, flight engineer, crew chief, and gunner--a total of five crewmembers.

Response: The wireless intercom is for the flight engineer/crewchief that is maneuvering in and around the rear of the aircraft to have commo and not get his cord tangled of ran over by loading vehicles. It is at present not for the entire crew.

i. USANCE, ATTN: MONA-NU, Paragraph 4,c,(1). Comment: Revise paragraph to read as follows, "the ICH must successfully perform its world missions across the spectrum of climates, weather and other environmental factors. The system must be able to withstand the material damaging effects of NBC contaminants and decontaminates. The system must be decontaminable to negligible risk levels and be compatible with operators and maintainers in MOPP IV. The system must be high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) survivable." Rationale: AR 70-75 requires mission essential systems to be HEMP survivable at a minimum and NBC contamination survivable. DoD 5000.2 requires that mission critical systems be survivable to the threat levels anticipated in their environment.

Response: This is a SLEP effort. The ICH will meet the existing CH-47D NBC requirements.

j. USAMDCS, ATTN: MCC-FCM, Paragraph 5,c,(4). Comment: REPLACE WITH: a Health Hazard Assessment (HHA) is an integral part of the design process and will be conducted to evaluate health risk to user, maintainer, handler, or warehouser. This assessment will identify hazards or potential hazards of all exposures associated with this equipment. It includes, but is not limited to, exposutes to toxic emissions (gases, vapors, mists, dust, particulate matter), acoustical energy, biological and chemical substances, oxygen deficiency, vibration (whole body and segmental), radiation (ionizing and nonionizing, including lasers), trauma (blunt, sharp, and musculoskeletal), temperature extremes and humidity, and shock (acceleration/deceleration. An HHA will be requested from the U.S. Army Materiel Command, ATTN: AMCSG-H, 5001 Eisenhower Ave, Alexandria, VA 22333-0001 by the Materiel Developer early in the development cycle. This HHA will be updated at each major milestone review. RATIONALE: Identifies additional constraints associated with Health Hazard Assessment.

Response: This is a SLEP and it is felt that the last sentence of paragraph 5,c,(4) covers this area. "The system must present no environmental hazards above the existing CH-47D."

4. Worldwide comments were requested to the draft ICH ORD no later than 10 July 96. FORSCOM did not provide any comment to the ICH ORD. The Directorate of Combat Developments, Fort Rucker, feels FORSCOM comments are valuable and requested FORSCOM to provide comments or concurrence in writing. FORSCOM stated they will provide us with comment. The ICH ORD is sent forward for approval without FORSCOM comments in order not to delay approval of the ICH ORD. Timely approval of the ICH ORD is important since the program is funded in the 98-03 POM and a requirements document is necessary to support the program. FORSCOM comments will be incorporated into an ORD amendment as required.

ANNEX D

FUNDING IMPLICATIONS

TO THE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

FOR THE IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER

(CH-47D SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP))

 

1. This chart outlines the proposed funding for the ICH program:

 

 

ANNEX E

TRAINING SUPPORT

TO THE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

FOR THE IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER

(CH-47D SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP))

 

1. INTRODUCTION. The purpose of this document is to describe the training requirements the Improved Cargo Helicopter (ICH) Integrated Training Program (ITP) must support. The Improved Cargo Helicopter ITP must be developed concurrently with the weapon system using the Army's System Approach to Training (SAT) process. The ITP will encompass all five step steps in the SAT process. Consideration will be given to modifying existing and developing new courseware and media with respect to cost and training effectiveness.

2. TRAINING CONSTRAINTS.

a. Course Lengths. The Improved Cargo Helicopter ITP will not increase course lengths over existing courses unless determined necessary by the SAT process.

b. Flight Hours. The Improved Cargo Helicopter ITP must be of sufficient quality and quantity to support inflight training hours determined by the SAT process. The flight hour requirement to maintain readiness level 1 will not exceed 70 hours semiannually.

c. Embedded Training (ET). Any ET capability must not adversely effect mission performance or safety of flight.

3. TRAINING REQUIREMENT.

a. General. Improved Cargo Helicopter training must be conducted within the framework of an ITP. Execution of the ICH ITP must produce and sustain combat ready CH-47D units. It must have the capability to conduct resident and non-resident sustainment training of Active Component (AC) and Reserve Component (RC) Operator, Maintainer, and Support (OMS) personnel, at all skill and readiness levels, in individual and collective tasks. It must follow appropriate doctrine and incorporate continual user involvement, to include periodic TRADOC review and approval of training development efforts. The ICH ITP at First Unit Equipped (FUE) must include TRADOC approved corrections to any deficiencies identified during Force Development and Experimentation (FDTE) and (Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOTE).

(1) Skill Level. The ICH ITP must provide resident/unit training, for personnel at all skill levels, to Department of Army (DA) standards in individual and collective tasks defined by appropriate TRADOC regulations.

(2) Level of Training. It must train 100 percent of the TRADOC approved OMS critical tasks to DA standards; must be available for Instructor and Key Personnel Training (IKPT); and must be ready for training (RFT) at DA approved facilities for FUE personnel.

(3) Courseware. Training courseware must comply with appropriate TRADOC regulations.

(4) Concurrency. The ICH ITP must reflect the configuration of the aircraft and it's weapons systems throughout the life cycle of the system.

(5) Hands-on-Training. The ICH must provide realistic hands-on training of task performance.

b. Resident Training.

(1) General. Resident training bases will conduct training of all MOS/SQI/ASI producing and aircraft qualification courses. These courses must incorporate individual and group paced training determined by the SAT process to provide qualification training for the ICH OMS personnel. A hierarchical building block approach to training to provide task introduction, reinforcement, and evaluation is desired. To the maximum extent possible, the ITP will be integrated with present CH-47D training, to include facilities and training media. It must include provision for peacetime and mobilization. There must be provisions for qualification training at TRADOC approved resident training base. During initial fielding, transition training will be provided. The decision to initiate separate courses will reside with the appropriate service school commandant.

(2) Operator Training.

(a) Level of Training. The ICH ITP must produce qualified, combat mission ready aviators who meet or exceed aviators and crewmember performance standards as defined by TRADOC.

(b) Course Content. Operator qualification courses must include instruction in aircraft and weapon system functions and operating procedures in normal and degraded modes. They must incorporate individual, crew, team, unit, and combined arms training aligned with CATS.

(c) Qualification Training. Aviator qualification training must include a supplemental course for CH-47D qualified aviators and an Aviator qualification course for aviators not qualified in the CH-47D. As necessary, there must be separate Instructor Pilot (IP) and Maintenance Test Pilot (MTP) courses.

(3) Maintainer and Support Personnel Training. The ICH ITP must provide training to support all maintenance below depot level. Training support package will be provided to proponent schools to support training if ICH unique critical tasks are selected for resident training.

c. Organizational Training. Standard battalion initial and continuation training must be conducted using a single site concept for fielding and proficiency sustainment. Unit personnel will deploy to a single site for staff training, battalion/ squadron/unit level collective training, gunnery training, and conduct of their initial and continuation Army Training and Evaluation Programs (ARTEPs). The single site must have adequate range facilities, on-site Common Equipment Sets (CESs), opposing force(OPFOR) resources, and simulation capabilities. Training must accommodate unit commanders' Mission Essential Task List (METL).

d. Sustainment Training. The ICH ITP will support sustainment and continuation training for qualified ICH OMS personnel worldwide. It must include appropriate training manuals, training guides, training aids, adequate electronic media and simulation capabilities.

e. Doctrine and Tactics Training (DTT).

(1) Operator. Operator DTT must be provided through resident training, organizational training, and sustainment training IAW TRADOC continuation training programs.

(2) Battalion/Squadron and Company/Troop Commanders and Staff. The ICH ITP must provide DTT to battalion/ squadron and /company/troop commanders and staff through initial and continuation unit training IAW DA training programs.

(3) Senior Leadership. The ICH ITP executive summary must be thorough enough to provide DTT to the senior leadership.

f. Instructor and Key Personnel Training (IKPT). The Materiel Developer must conduct IKPT for resident training base.

g. New Equipment Training Team (NETT). A NETT will be used if it proves to be the most cost effective method to train certain skills for OMS personnel. The NETT will be used to provide updated training, if necessary, to field or fielding units.

4. SIGNIFICANT TRAINING ISSUES AT RISK. There is a schedule risk associated with the requirements to develop the ICH ITP concurrently with the aircraft, to ensure it is available for IKPT, and to ensure it is fully tested, validated, verified, and ready for training at approved DA approved training site for FUE.

5. GENERAL TRAINING SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS. Aircraft and training device production rates and budget constraints may have an adverse effect on the ability to establish a TRADOC resident training base in a timely manner. Therefore, consideration should be given to a contractor resident training program until: sufficient aircraft and training devices are available and fielded to TRADOC; the materiel developer has developed and transferred the appropriate courseware which TRADOC has approved and accepted; and an adequate number of government instructor personnel have been properly trained.

 

6. TRAINING MEDIA REQUIREMENTS.

a. General. The ICH ITP training media must support initial and sustainment training requirements. The types, quantities, mix, and fidelity of training media must be determined based on the SAT process as well as cost and training effectiveness analysis. The user requires a capability which facilitates change management of all training media in a timely and efficient manner. Commonality, standardization, and interoperability will be implemented to the maximum extent possible to maintain the integrity of the ITP.

(1) Training Media. Operation of training media must be oriented towards the user. Trainer guides must be developed which will provide the trainer with the information necessary to get maximum training benefit out of each training device. Software dependent training devices must incorporate interactive self-teaching and student performance feedback features. The media must be able to vary difficulty to match increasing student capabilities as instruction progresses. Where appropriate, the training media must enable OMS personnel to respond to varying scenarios and conditions.

(2) Training Devices. The ICH IT training media must consider Distance Learning capabilities, training devices including electronic media, and simulators. Training devices and simulators must support procedural, flight, maintenance, and mission training. The training media must be integrated, networkable, and state-of-the-art when fielded. It must also be reliable, easily maintained, and resistant to obsolescence.

(3) Training Media Architecture. Training media architecture must provide for growth to interface with other programmed and projected simulation systems.

(4) Training Media Software. Software modules must be transferable to other compatible government simulation systems.

(5) Existing Training devices. Where economically and functionally prudent, technically feasible, and acquisition expedient, the media should include the modification of existing CH-47D operator and maintainer training devices.

(6) Standardization, Interoperabilty, Commonality.

(a) The media must bridge and support the Army's CATS spectrum from individual/crew to team/unit to force-on-force/combined arms training.

(b) The training device design must consider standardized, commonality of hardware and software, and interoperability with other similar devices and the Combined Arms Tactical Trainer through LAN and Longhaul Network.

(c) The ICH simulators will be Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) compliant.

b. Individual/Crew Training Devices and Simulators. State-of-the-art electronic interactive media instructional devices are required to support classroom, flight line, and unit training. This media must be adaptable to technological advances and have adequate room for growth.

(1) Interactive Courseware (ICW). If used, ICW should consider Computer Based Instruction (CBI) with common authoring and graphics, and IBM PC compatible programs capable of enabling instructors to rapidly develop, network, and update as necessary, and distribute POI's, lesson plans, and student guides. It should have the ability to maintain concurrence with aircraft changes and configuration management. This capability should support individual self-paced instruction as well as formal classroom presentations and must interact with students and instructors.

(2) Operator Simulators. Operator simulators must have the physical fidelity and functional capabilities necessary for individual pilots and crew to perform TRADOC selected critical tasks to appropriate standards. Simulators must be capable of training and sustaining individual and proficiency in tasks including normal (contact and instrument), emergency, gunnery, tactical, and maintenance test pilot operations. The cockpit, flight, weapons, sensors, Aircraft Survivability Equipment (ASE), communications, and navigation systems of these simulators must accurately replicate, physically and functionally, those of the actual aircraft and its systems to preclude negative habit transfer.

(3) Maintainer Devices. Maintenance training devices must simulate the physical and functional fidelity necessary to train TRADOC selected critical maintenance tasks to applicable TRADOC standards.

(4) Embedded Training (ET). Where training is enhanced, on board ET as an integral element of the ICH is highly desired. Consideration should be given to embedded training capabilities for aircraft survivability equipment.

c. Collective Training Devices and Simulators. The ICH collective training devices and simulators must have the capability to simulate, with a high degree of fidelity, the functional capabilities but not necessarily with the physical exactness of the ICH. Fidelity must enable training of collective tasks to include multi-ship, combined arms and joint operations as well as mission rehearsals.

(1) Training Capability. The collective training simulators must be capable of training TRADOC selected collective tasks to applicable DA standards. Individual/crew tasks which support those critical collective tasks must be sustained.

(2) Battlefield Management. The collective training devices must include stations for training battlefield management to train crews, commanders and staffs. These stations must simulate management of: Maintenance support (repairs and recovery); supply (fuel, ammunition, and parts); operation (command and control); engineer support (obstacle emplacement); fire support (artillery, missile, and close air); and administrative support (casualty and personnel requirements). Commanders must be able to view the battlefield through dynamic visual representations from multiple perspectives, i.e. own unit, supporting/supported units, threat, and overview.

(3) Network Capability. These devices must be DIS compliant and Networkable with collective training simulators of the Combined Arms Tactical Training (CATT) family on the LAN or Longhaul network.

d. Simulator Visual System. The ICH visual systems must adequately replicate imagery of all sensors in respective fields-of-view (FOVs), as well as out-the-window (OTW), to display scene content in day, night, and in limited visibility caused by adverse weather and battlefield obscuration. the visual capabilities must be compatible and interoperable with those used in the CATT family with growth potential to interface with future systems.

(1) Field of View (FOV) and Resolution. It is desired that the aircraft training devices provide out-the-window visual of sufficient horizontal and vertical range that will allow crewmembers to train collective tasks.

(2) Display Capability. The system must be able to display rotor disk characteristics and interactive supporting elements within a respective FOV which an ICH unit could expect to encounter on the battlefield.

e. Configuration Management. To maintain training integrity, simulators must be designed concurrently with the aircraft. Simulator configuration must reflect current aircraft configuration and functionality and be capable of upgrading to the future aircraft changes.

f. Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) Data Base Acceptability. Simulators for operator qualification and sustainment training must have resident DMA data generated data bases and the capability to accept other DMA data generated data bases to support mission rehearsals, simulation training exercises (STXs) and large scale simulation gaming. Simulators must be capable of down-loading resident data bases and loading existing and future DMA data generated data bases written in Standard Interface Format (SIF).

g. Semi-automated Forces (SAFOR). The simulators must have the capability to generate interactive friendly and threat SAFOR to include maneuver, combat support and combat service support units up to battalion size for friendly elements and regimental size for threat elements. The SAFOR must be compatible and interoperable with the CATT family SAFOR.

h. Recording and Scoring Capabilities. Recording of training for reply during briefings, debriefings, and After Action reviews (AARs) is required. The capability must be able to "freeze" training to emphasize learning objectives or errors and be able to restart training from the interruption. Additionally, it must have the means to record movement on the terrain data base, weapons engagements, hits, kills, ammunition expended, communications, combat support, and combat service support operations in audio, video, and data printout with appropriate time-tags. Individual/crew and collective training devices and simulators must also incorporate a common integrated scoring system to monitor progression and to objectively evaluate performance.

i. Commonality Constraints. Software interchangeability and hardware component commonality and compatibility within the ICH and its training system is required. Commonality between ICH training devices and those of other training systems is highly desired.

j. Size Constraints. Low complexity, resident and nonresident training devices must be moveable through standard exterior/interior doors by no more than two personnel without operator disassembly below authorized levels.

k. Power Constraints. The ICH training device power consumption must be energy efficient and must be compatible with ITP operational location. Appropriate electrical surge protection is required.

l. Environmental/Safety Constraints. Training device environmental requirements must be identified and must not exceed those of existing, similar devices. Reduced environmental requirements are desired. Training devices must have adequate temperature and humidity tolerance (10-35 degrees Celsius and 10-95 percent humidity) for operation in their intended environment.

m. RAM Constraints. Training devices must operate 16 hours per day, 5 days per week during peacetime and 20 hours per day, 6 days per week during mobilization, with 95 percent availability.

(1) Period Completion Rate. OMS personnel training devices must have a 95% training period completion rate. A training period without termination, interruption, or degradation to an ineffective training period completion.

(2) Failures per period. The maximum allowable number of system malfunctions or failures during a training period is one.

(3) Mean Time To Repair. The mean time to repair (MTRR) a training device after termination, interruption, or degradation to an ineffective training level must not exceed one hour.

n. OMS Training Device Logistical Support. Contractor Logistical Support (CLS) for life cycle support for training device hardware and software desired.