USS KEARSARGE LHD-3 SHIP'S LOADING CHARACTERISTICS PAMPHLET

1. General Cargo Stowage:

a. Cargo stowage facilities consist of three general cargo or ammunition holds and one flammable liquid cargo hold located on the second platform and inner bottom levels. All cargo designated for stowage in these compartments should be palletized on standard 40" by 48" warehousing pallets.

b. Cargo/Ammo magazine compartments provide stowage, operating space and elevator accesses. Each compartment is equipped with a sprinkler system, smoke sensing devices, hand fire extinguishers, tiedown equipment, forklifts and elevators. Cargo holds #9 and #10 have emergency cargo handling systems. Hold #9 is equipped with a halon fire extinguishing system.

LEVEL

DESCRIPTION

TAC #

USAGE

ELEV #

Innerbottom

       
 

Troop Small Arms Mag

6-47-0-M

Stow troop small arms ammo

N/A

 

Fuze Mag

6-47-2-M

Stow fuzes

 
 

#4 Lower Cargo Ammo Mag (Fwd)

6-49-0-M

Demo charges, Smoke grenades, General Ammo

1,2

 

White Phosphorus Mag

6-51-0-M

Stow white phosphorous ammo

1,2

 

#4 Lower Cargo Ammo Mag (Aft Stbd)

6-53-1-M

General Ammo

1,2

 

#4 Lower Cargo Ammo Mag (Aft Port)

6-53-2-M

General Ammo

1,2

 

#5 Lower Cargo Ammo Mag

6-57-0-M

General Ammo

3,4

Second Platform

Troop and Aviation Pyro Mag

5-49-0-M

Stow Pyrotechnics

1,2

 

#4 Upper Hold Cargo Ammo Mag

5-49-01-M

Rocket and bomb stowage and buildup

1,2

 

#5 Upper Cargo Ammo Mag

5-57-0-M

MLA, rockets, missiles, etc.

3,4

 

#9 Cargo Ammo Mag

5-89-0-M

Stow MTA, general ammo, demo, blasting caps, arty proj, etc.

5

(1) Hold #4 consists of two levels, an upper and lower level. Hold #4 is designed to accept general cargo or ammunition. Portable bulkheads are available at the lower level for dividing cargo into separate compartments, if desired. The Troop and Aviation Pyro Magazine is within 2nd Platform, Hold #4. The White Phosphorous Magazine is contained within lower hold #4.

(2) Hold #5 consists of two levels, an upper and lower level. Both compartments are designed to accept general cargo or ammunition. These holds do not have Emergency Cargo Handling System but do have two elevators. 2nd Platform has portable bulkheads for dividing the forward half into three separate compartments, if required. 2nd Platform, hold #5 is primarily used for missile and rocket motor stowage.

(3) Hold #9 has one level. The 2nd Platform is designed to accept general cargo or ammunition. It has portable bulkheads for dividing into four compartments. It also has portable bulkhead fittings for segregation of incompatible items such as demolitions and blasting caps on the port side.

(4) Hold #10 has one level. Hold #10 is the only hold designated for packaged POL stowage. It is used to stow all Landing Force Operational

Reserve Material (LFORM) classes I, III and IV.

2. Heavy Lift, Outsized Cargo, and CONEX Handling and Stowage:

a. For the purposes of the WASP class LHD, heavy lift cargo is defined as any item, even if standard pallet size, which exceeds 4000 pounds in weight. Outsized cargo is defined as any item which exceeds 72 inches in any direction.

b. Heavy lift, outsized, QuadCon, or CONEX cargo is incompatible with the monorail conveyor and ammo/cargo magazine forklifts, and therefore, cannot be stowed in holds 4, 5, and 9. Items of this nature will be stowed in Upper Vehicle Stowage. This cargo may be lifted aboard by crane to the flight deck via the port or starboard side aircraft elevators on the hangar deck level. From there RT fork-lifts organic to the ship will move the items to their stowage location in Upper Vehicle Stowage. These items may be embarked by landing craft via the well deck. There they will be taken off the landing craft and placed into position in the upper vehicle stowage by RT forklift. If this method is contemplated, it must occur prior to loading vehicles in Upper Vehicle Stowage and requires a considerable amount of time. Cargo stowed in Lower Vehicle Stowage must not exceed 90" in height or 150" in width nor weigh more than 6,000 pounds.

3. Ammunition Stowage: Class V (A) and V (W) ammunitions may be stowed in accordance with the information provided in NAVSEA OP 4. Stowage of these items is authorized in cargo holds 4, 5, and 9, subject to the limitations imposed by the above mentioned. Ammunition will not be stowed in the same

compartment with general cargo unless it is separated by approved partitioning. Unless an emergency condition exists, requests to draw ammunition stowed in the holds will be submitted to the Combat Cargo Officer in writing no later than 48 hours prior to the requested issue time. This will ensure proper coordination with those departments concerned with ammunition handling evolutions. The owning unit will conspicuously mark training ammunition. Combat Cargo personnel will be present whenever training ammunition is removed from the magazines to ensure that LFORM is not issued. The Commanding Officer of Troops (COT) will ensure that all ammunition is collected, properly packaged, and returned to the shipís Ordnance Officer when returning from training exercises. The shipís ordnance personnel must visually inspect all ammunition for accountability and serviceability prior to it being stowed in magazines. No ammunition or any type of explosives are authorized in the shipís work spaces or berthing compartments.

a. High explosives are loaded and unloaded in the same manner as general cargo with strict compliance with the contents of the above references and guidance applied. High explosive materials may be loaded in cargo holds 4, 5, and 9.

b. Demolition materials are loaded and unloaded in the same manner as general cargo with strict compliance with the contents of the above references and guidance.

c. Chemical ammunitions are loaded and unloaded in the same manner as general cargo. Compatibility factors however normally require isolation from other munitions. It is therefore recommended that units anticipating a need to carry chemical ammunitions first contact the ship's Combat Cargo Officer to determine the feasibility of such requirements.

(1) Thermite requires more stringent control than other munitions during loading, stowage, and unloading. Accordingly, it is recommended that units anticipating a need to carry thermite, beyond that already held by the ship should contact the ship to determine the feasibility of such requirements prior to actual embarkation. The ship has 6 jettisonable thermite grenade

lockers located on the starboard gallery deck between frames 55 and 61.

(2) White phosphorous ammunitions require more stringent control than other munitions during loading, stowage, and unloading. All white phosphorous ammunition will be stowed in the White Phosphorous Magazine (6-51-0-M) located in Hold #4 Lower Cargo Ammo Mag. Units anticipating a need to carry white phosphorous ammunitions beyond that currently prepositioned should contact the ship's Combat Cargo Officer to determine the feasibility of such actions. Stowage space for this type munitions is minimal and therefore at a premium.

d. Blasting Caps and fuzes are normally loaded and unloaded in the same manner as general cargo, with strict adherence to compatibility considered. Isolation from other munitions normally provided by a fire retardant bulkhead is sufficient to provide adequate safety for stowage of fuzes. Accordingly, these items will be stowed in the Fuze Magazine, 6-47-2-M. Minimum space is available for the stowage of Class V (W) training allowances of this type so consideration should be given prior to actual embarkation. Blasting Caps will be stowed in hold #9.

e. Pyrotechnic ammunition may be loaded and unloaded in the same manner as general cargo with strict adherence to compatibility. Generally these munitions are stowed in the Troop and Aviation Pyro magazine (5-49-0-M) in upper hold #4 forward. Stowage space for these type munitions is minimal and embarking units anticipating a need to carry supplies of training allowances in this category should contact the ship in an effort to determine the feasibility of supporting such requirements.

f. Small arms are loaded and unloaded in the same manner as general cargo ensuring strict compliance with appropriate regulations governing munitions compatibility. Small arms ammunitions may be loaded in any magazine, however, the Troop Small Arms Magazine (6-47-0-M) should be utilized.

g. Bombs, Mines, and Torpedoes are loaded and unloaded in the same fashion as general cargo. They are stowed in cargo hold 4, 5, and 9, subject to the limitations imposed by compatibility for these items.

4. Special Weapon Stowage. No capability exists onboard.

5. Dangerous Cargo (Less Supply Class III and V) Stowage. Dangerous Cargo in this sense, refers to items generally found in UP&TT line numbers 13, 14, and 15 such as flammable gases, acids, caustic materials, lithium, and other battery related items not included in Supply Class III and V. This ship is equipped with storerooms and storage lockers designed to carry these items. Prior coordination with the ship's Combat Cargo Officer, when planning their use, should be made.

6. Petroleum-Oil-Lubricants (POL):

a. Packaged/Drummed POL Stowage is available in troop cargo hold #10. Whether drums or cans, all POL stowed in hold #10 must be palletized as noted in paragraph 1. No transfer of any POLís from one container to another is authorized in hold #10 and access to POLís stowed in the hold is extremely limited. Therefore, for items that units will need access to while the ship is underway, the ship has a Flammable Liquid Storeroom (2-13-1-K) for the storage of 5 gallon cans, quart size containers, and combustible cans (spray paint, lubricants, etc. Coordination must be made with the Combat Cargo Officer if use of this space is desired.

b. Bulk POL products are loaded and off-loaded from ship's tanks through fittings located on the starboard side Refueling-at-Sea (RAS) stations.

(1) Refueling points for vehicles, landing craft, and aircraft are located throughout the ship. Specific locations are indicated on deck diagrams contained in SECTION XI of this document.

(2) Refueling rates vary, depending on the size of the equipment at the particular refueling point. JP-5 refueling points with one and one half inch hoses pump at 50 gallons per minute; those with two and one half inch hoses pump at 200 gallons per minute.

c. POL (BULK) Carrying Vehicle Stowage. Refuelers/tankers can be filled prior to debarkation at the refueling station located forward and aft on the monorail catwalk and on the forward bulk-head of the third deck (FR 49 starboard side) level (upper vehicle forward). When planning the vehicle load, refueler/ tankers should be stowed near the fueling station, if filling will be required.

(1) JP-5. These refuelers may be stowed on the third deck (upper vehicle stowage) only. The vehicle may be full (up to 75% rated capacity) or empty and purged. Refuelers may only be embarked with fuel by exception due to the capability of the ship to fill them prior to debarking.

(2) Refueling. This ship has the capacity to carry 462,556 gallons of JP-5. Refueling stations are as follows:

Locations

Compartment #

JP-5

DFM

Remarks

Well Deck (Port FR 97 and 112)

2-113-2-J RAS

2-97-2-F

NO

YES

2

Well Deck (Stbd)

2-113-1-J

Yes

NO

1

3rd Deck (Stbd)

FR 49

Yes

NO

1

2nd Deck (Monorail Catwalk Fwd & Aft)

FR 58, FR 75

Yes

No

2

1st Plat. (Fwd) (Stbd)

FR 49

Yes

No

1

1st Plat. (Aft) (Port)

FR 72

Yes

No

1

MAIN DECK (Stbd)

HANGAR DECK

FR 111

YES

NO

1

d. The ship is capable of transferring bulk POL products ashore by use of standard bulk fuel transfer systems. Station locations, fitting sizes, and pumping rates are shown on deck diagrams contained in SECTION XI of this document.

e. Stowage of Vehicles Auxiliary Five Gallon MOGAS Cans. Vehicles may be

stowed, with their full auxiliary five gallon MOGAS cans attached, in those protected compartments or areas authorized for stowing vehicles provided the following precautions are taken:

(1) Auxiliary five gallon MOGAS cans must comply with MIL-C1283E.

(2) Inspect cans after filling with MOGAS to assure they are leak

proof.

(3) Apply seals to cans to aid in detecting loosened caps or tampering.

(4) Properly secure cans in their designated racks.

(5) After operation ashore, used fuel cans shall be refilled, inspected and sealed before re-embarking. Empty (and not purged) or partially filled fuel cans shall not be brought aboard ship.

(6) Extreme care must be exercised while embarking and debarking to

ensure the fuel cans are not damaged and that vehicles are properly tied down while stowed to prevent damage.

 

(7) MOGAS may be transferred from five gallon cans into another container once the following conditions have been met:

7. Vehicle Stowage (Less Bulk POL Carriers): The following items should be given special consideration with regard to vehicle handling and stowage.

a. Vehicles to be airlifted must be stowed to allow access from the stowed location to the hangar deck where they can be taken to the flight deck. The only ramp accessing the hangar deck from the third deck is on the port side of the ship. Vehicles which are identifed in the Landing Plan as requiring to be offloaded by helicopter must be load planned accordingly.

b. In order to efficiently combat load the ship, it is essential that the landing sequence priority number and serial number of each vehicle (prime mover and towed load) be displayed on the vehicle prior to embarkation. If placards are used for this purpose instead of paint, they must be secured inside the windshield where they are easily visible and cannot present a Foreign Object and Debris (FOD) hazard to the propellers of LCACís.

c. For vehicles embarking/debarking via landing craft, overhead restrictions are not normally a concern. If embarkation/ debarkation is via the side port ramp, care must be taken to ensure that the vehicle does not exceed 125" in height or 129" in width. Further, vehicle weights can, under no circumstance, exceed an absolute maximum weight of 47,000 pounds when using the side port ramp.

d. Once stowed, vehicles may not be washed. Every effort should be made to clean vehicles to maximum practicable extent prior to embarkation. Vehicles may be washed with fresh water as they approach the ramp leading from the well deck to the upper vehicle stowage area. This wash is not to remove dirt, but to remove salt water contaminants obtained while transiting to the ship in landing craft. Embarked units are responsible for providing a working party of at least 6 persons to man fire hoses in conducting the washdown. These personnel should wear waterproof boots and wet weather gear while conducting the washdown. It is imperative that the working party reports to the Combat Cargo Assistant (CCA) Welldeck prior to any equipment arriving to the ship to avoid stopping the onload. If the washdown becomes too time consuming it may be stopped by the Combat cargo Officer to avoid a delay in the onload.

e. Once stowed, vehicles will not be moved without prior coordination with the Combat Cargo Officer.

f. Once stowed, vehicles will not be started without ventilation systems operating. No more than 25% of the vehicles should be operated at the same time.

g. In accordance with LHD3INST 5000.1_ (Embarked Troop Regulations), a troop guard will be maintained in the vehicle stowage areas.

8. Aircraft (Non-Operational) Stowage:

a. Aircraft embarked for transportation only (opportunity lift) will be stowed in order to use the minimum amount of deck space. A total of 28 CH-46 equivalents can be stowed on the hangar deck, and a total of 122 CH-46 equivalents can be stowed on the flight deck.

b. Aircraft embarked for transportation only, must be accompanied by an appropriate number of TD-1A tie down chains and wheel chocks to supplement the ship's allowance. Ship riders accompanying aircraft are required at the rate

of one man per aircraft.

9. Aircraft (Operational) Stowage:

a. KEARSARGE has 9 launch and recovery helicopter spots on the flight deck as well as 4 high thrust secure fittings for AV-8B's on the aft starboard portion of the flight deck. Specific locations of these points are shown on the deck diagrams contained in SECTION XI of this document.

b. KEARSARGE has 6 refueling/defueling points (4 port and 2 starboard) serving the flight deck. Specific locations of these points are shown on the deck diagram contained in SECTION XI of this document.

c. Arming and dearming spots on the flight deck will be determined by the mission, weather, and other operational considerations. Aviation ordnance assembly and disassembly points are shown on the deck diagrams contained in SECTION XI of this document.

d. Additional information on aircraft support facilities is contained in paragraph 13 of this document, and in SECTION VII (Embarked Organizational Working Spaces).

e. An example of a common aircraft mix of operational aircraft is as follows: two UH-IN's, four AH-1T's, fourteen CH-46's, four CH-53's and six AV-8B's.

10. Landing Force Operational Reserve Material (LFORM) and Mission Load Allowance (MLA). LFORM and MLA will be carried as directed by higher headquarters. It is anticipated that LFORM will consist of Class I, III, IV, V (A) and V (W) and will require space throughout holds 4, 5, 9, and 10. COMNAVSURFLANTINST 4080.1_/FMFLANT Order P4000.1_ details the specific quantities and items to be embarked. Quantities actually on board and stowage locations will be depicted and distributed in supplements to this publication as required.

  1. Landing Craft/Amphibian Vehicle Stowage: The landing craft system includes all facilities for handling, stowage, maintenance and dry-docking of landing craft and ship's boats as well as facilities required for handling and stowage of amphibian vehicles.

 

a. Ship's Landing Craft Capacity

Type Qty

LCAC 3

or

LCM-8 6

or

LCU-1610 Class 2

b. Various Operational Combinations

LCAC 3 0 0 0

or

LCM-8 0 2 6 0

or

LCU-1610 Class 0 1 0 2

 

 

c. Amphibian vehicles, such as the LVTP-7 and LARC-V, can be stowed in the third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage area). A total of 21 LVTP-7 vehicles can be stowed in this area.

d. LCACís normally will not operate in combination with other landing craft in the well since they operate in a dry well condition. Facilities are available in the well deck for electrical hook-up, both 400 and 60 Hz. Three freshwater and three distilled water outlets are also available. Two DFM fueling stations are provided in the well deck for LCAC refueling and may also be used, when requested, to refuel vehicles located in the well deck, including vehicles which are preloaded in landing craft.

12. Troop Weapon Stowage Areas. A rifle rack is provided for each troop berth (E-6 and below). Berthing compartment (1-L-0-L) has only 63 rifle racks for the 66 berthing racks available, therefore, if required, 3 rifles would have to be stowed in another weapon stowage area. Rifle racks are in rifle stowage areas located within the berthing compartments with the exception of berthing compartments (1-33-4-L) and (1-33-5-L). The rifle stowage for these two spaces is located in compartment (1-31-3-Q) which has 302 rifle racks. Each rifle rack is designed to be locked individually with an installed key lock. A troop armory (02-L-2-Q) and a squadron armory (02-109-1-Q) have stowage for various weapons, both crew-served and individual weapons and have space for repair facilities in each armory.

13. Ship's Cargo Handling Equipment (CHE)/Facilities: Cargo handling evolutions onboard KEARSARGE are of necessity divided into two broad areas: air and surface delivery. In support of these two areas, the following information is provided:

a. Cargo Handling. The cargo handling system provides for the embarkation of cargo from the pier, landing craft or helicopters and its stowage into designated vehicle and cargo stowage areas. The major components of the Cargo Handling System include cargo holds, cargo elevators, cargo monorails and forklifts.

b. Aircraft. The Aircraft System provides the facilities necessary for the landing/launching cycle, tiedown, fueling, stowage, maintenance (including fresh water washdown), and operation of embarked helicopters.

c. Portable cargo handling equipment available onboard KEARSARGE includes the following items:

 

TYPE

CAPACITY/

SIZE

QUANTITY

Notes

Rough Terrain Forklift

10,000 lb

2

1

Diesel Forklift

6,000 lb

9

2

Electric Forklift

4,000 lb

10

3

Diesel Forklift

4,000 lb

8

4

Cargo Nets

10 ft X 10 ft

20

 

Cargo Nets

12 ft X 12 ft

100

 

Cargo Nets

14 ft X 14 ft

125

 

Leg Assembly, Sling MK 105

 

75

 

Sling, Hoisting MK 105

 

80

 

Sling, Hoisting MK 126

 

4

 

Sling, Pallet MK 70 MOD 2

 

4

 

Sling, Pallet MK 85 MOD 0

 

150

 

Sling, Pallet MK 86, MOD 0

 

150

 

Sling, Pallet MK 87, MOD 0

 

100

 

Sling, Pallet MK 93, MOD 0

 

2

 

Sling, Pallet MK 100, MOD 0

 

50

 

Vehicle Sling

5 Ton

2 ea

 

Vehicle Sling

17 Ton

2 ea

 

Aircraft Tow Tractor A/S32A-3T

8,500 lb

6

 

Aircraft Spotting Dolly

12,000 lb

4

 

Helicopter Cargo Slings

4,000 lb

306

 

Sling Handling Yokes

12,000 lb

4

 

Tie Down Assembly

17,000

954

 

Tie Down Assembly

35,000

367

 

Tie Down Assembly

70,000

220

 

Tie Down Chain (Ammo)

7 Feet

270

 

Tie Down Chain (Ammo)

26 Feet

960

 

Aircraft Tie Down Assembly

 

470

 

Portable Trailer Hitch (Currently not on hand)

2.5 ton max

48

 

Notes: (1) One on the flight deck, one in the hangar bay

(2) One in lower vehicle stowage, two in the hangar bay, and six on the flight deck

  1. (3) Distributed throughout holds/magazines.

(4) Four on the flight deck, four in the hangar bay

(These are normal underway stowage locations and may change based off approved loadplan.)

d. Helicopter Facilities. The LHD is of sufficient size to permit simultaneous operation of one to three land/launch patterns with more than adequate communications to control each pattern. In addition to the land/launch capabilities, it possesses maintenance areas both on the flight deck and the hangar deck. Each is equipped with adequate facilities as related in the following paragraphs:

(1) Flight Deck. The flight deck has the following maintenance facilities to support pre-flight and post-flight maintenance:

(a) Eleven deck-edge electrical power outlets for 115 volts, 400 Hz AC and 28 volt DC (6 port and 5 starboard) (See Diagram XI-17).

(b) Ten fresh water outlets (6 port, 3 starboard, 1 on island) (See Diagram XI-17).

(c) Two nitrogen outlets (See Diagram XI-17).

(d) Onboard oxygen breathing generating system (OBOGS) (03-86-1-Q).

(e) Six aviation JP-5 fueling and defueling stations (4 port and 2 starboard). One auxiliary vehicle fueling station (See Diagram XI-17).

(f) Four AV-8B high thrust secure fittings (3 port and 1 starboard) (See Diagram XI-17).

(g) Ten low pressure air outlets (6 port and 4 starboard) (See Diagram XI-17).

(h) Squadron Work Center Annex (03-64-1-Q)

(i) Squadron Work Center Flight Line (03-65-1-Q).

(j) Two demineralized water outlets (starboard) (See Diagram XI-17) used for AV-8B Water injection and turbine flush.

In addition to the facilities listed above, the flight deck is serviced by two deck edge elevators and nine land/launch spots that will accommodate CH-53E and smaller helicopters.

(2) Hangar Deck. The aircraft hangar deck and associated aviation shops provide facilities to perform scheduled and unscheduled maintenance for a composite helicopter squadron. The hangar deck support facilities include the following:

(a) One bridge crane with a 12,000 lb capacity pendant mounted on a common athwartship monorail (between frames 105-110). Also an additional 2,000 lb capacity pendant for small component stowage is provided.

(b) Six electrical power outlets for 115 volts, 400 Hz AC and 28 volt DC (3 port and 3 starboard) (See Diagram XI-19.).

(c) Two fresh water outlets (1 port and 1 starboard) (See Diagram XI-19.).

(d) One nitrogen outlet (port side) (See Diagram XI-19.).

(e) Two JP-5 aviation fueling and defueling stations (1 port and 1 starboard) (See Diagram XI-19.).

(f) Nine low pressure air outlets (4 port and 5 starboard) (See Diagram XI-19.).

(g) One demineralized water outlet (starboard) (See Diagram XI-19.).

(h) Two 2,000 lb capacity portable manual chain hoists are provided with beam clamps to facilitate supporting from the overhead within the hangar deck area for general aircraft maintenance requirements.

(i) One 4,000 lb capacity monorail and pneumatic chain hoist is provided for the Aviation Ground Support Equipment Shop.

(j) One 4,000 lb capacity monorail and pneumatic chain hoist is provided to stow and remove aircraft internal and external auxiliary fuel tanks from their stowage area and to remove forklift truck batteries.

(k) One 1,000 lb capacity manual chain hoist is provided for the Mobil Maintenance Facility (AV-8 Van) Integrating Room to lift aircraft avionics components from the hangar deck to van area.

(l) Tne 4,000 lb capacity monorail and pneumatic chain hoist is provided to move aircraft engines into the Aviation Engine Shop.

(m) One 4,000 lb capacity manual chain hoist is provided to service the hatch-over area in the Aviation Engine Shop to erect aircraft engines.

(3) Helicopter Maintenance Support. The LHD can physically support the intermediate maintenance requirements for a Composite Helicopter Squadron with its Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD). There are also numerous stowage bins for aircraft small parts in storerooms as well as helo blade box stowage on the hangar deck bulkheads.

(4) Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The LHD has the following allowances:

Ground Support Equipment Part # Allowance System

Adapter - Engine Stand 21C4243G01 1

Adapter - Transport 271A5100-1 4 u/w AERO 12C Skid Only

Adapter Set, Tail Boom Handling T101622 1 u/w Trailer

1480A5100-1

Base - Aircraft Wing Stand 2 (AV-8B)

Blade Rack Assembly 65720-15008-041 2 Gen

Ground Support Equipment Part # Allowance System

Blade, Support Assembly (1) 65E00986-1 2 Gen

Blade, Support Assembly (2) 1686A5100-1 2 Gen

Corrosion Control (Aft) - Jet Engine 1390-100 3 Gen

Dolly, Aircraft Spot 1117A5100-1 4 Gen

Hoist Device, Rotor A02G1391-1 2 Gen

Hydraulic Test Stand 68A5-J1000-1 1 Gen

Jack, Hydraulic, Trip 3961 8 Gen

Jack, Tripod, 10 Ton, Model T10-2FH 0

Jack, Tripod, 12 Ton, Model T12-11FH C569J1270 2 Gen

Lifting Tackle 1359A5701-2 32 w/c 900

Maintenance Platform 415175 3 Gen

Maintenance Platform - Aircraft 47R16420 0 Gen

Nitrogen Servicing Unit 1317A5100 4 Gen

Preoiler - Pressure Fill Tank 61A108J-1 2 Gen

Sling, Aircraft Main (1) 75D110000-1001 1 Gen

Sling, Aircraft Main (2) AU2G1348-1 1 Gen

Sling, Aircraft Main (3) 65700-70171-041 1 Gen

Sling, Aircraft Main, A/C Hoisting 3900009 1 Gen

Sling - Airframe T101626 2 (AH-1W)

Sling Assembly 65700-70036-041 0 Sys 778 (H-53)

Sling, Engine Assembly CPWA30804-50 1 Gen

Sling, Engine Duct CPWA30608 1 Gen

Sling - Engine, Pivoting 21C4239G01 1 Gen

Sling, Exhaust Assembly CPWA30608 1 Gen

Sling, Lifting, Engine 787A5795 2 Gen

Sling, Multiple Leg 75D110034-1003 2 Gen

Sling, Grip Main Rotor T101632 1 Gen

Standard Maintenance 21C7220G01 1 Gen

Stand Maintenance, A (1) 21C2178G001 1 Gen

Stand Maintenance, A (2) 21C1293G001 4 Gen

Stand Maintenance, I 1395AS564 2 Gen

Stand, Platform, Bomb Assy F32K-1A 2 (Drooped Out FE)

Stand, Rotor Blade 65720-20005-041 1 Gen

Test Stand - Hydraulic Check and Fill 1415A5100 2 Gen

Tie Down, Aircraft M 75D290020-1001 1 Gen

Towbar, Aircraft 8 Albar 1479A5100-1 8 (CH-46E/CH-53E)

Towbar, Aircraft 15 Albar 1479A5200-1 4 (AV-8B/CH-53E)

Towbar, Aircraft 20 Albar 1479A5300-1 12 (AH-1W/AV-8B/ CH-46E)

Tractor, Aircraft Towing-Type A/S32A-32T 1513A5100-1 5 Gen

Trailer, Aircraft Engine 1480A5100-1 2 (AH-1W/AV-8B)

Trailer, Water Demineralizing 75D290020-1003 0

Mobile Electric Power Plant 62A100 3 Gen

e. Cargo Stowage Support Systems. In addition to the forklifts mentioned

in paragraph 13c of this section, the following systems further facilitate the movement of cargo aboard KEARSARGE.

(1) Cargo Elevators.

(a) There are six four-pallet cargo elevators with a 12,000 lb capacity provided for handling cargo, cargo munitions, and flammable liquid between the cargo holds and deck levels served by the elevators.

(b) There are two four-pallet elevators in holds 4 and 5 and one each in holds 9 and 10. One elevator in hold 4 services the innerbottom, second platform, third deck, flight deck, and the other elevator services the innerbottom, second platform, and third deck. One elevator in hold 5 services the innerbottom, second platform, main deck, 01 level, flight deck and the other elevator services the innerbottom, second platform, and third deck. The elevator in hold 9 services the second platform, third deck, second deck, hangar deck, 01 level and flight deck. The elevator in hold 10 services the

second platform and hangar deck.

(2) Monorail System.

(a) The monorail system consists of a track system which services the third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage) and well deck areas between frames 54 and 129. The third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage) has two tracks located between frames 62 and 83 on the port and starboard sides of the monorail catwalk. Also, the pallet staging area is from frames 65 to 79 on the port and starboard sides of the monorail catwalk.

(b) Two monorail units are used with an additional unit provided as a spare. Each unit has two 3,000 pound capacity hoisting winches capable of being operated simultaneously or independently.

(c) The monorail system operates during loading or unloading operations in the well deck and third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage) areas. It can also be used to transport landing craft engines and deliver them to the third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage) area for further transportation to the Aircraft Engine Shop on the hangar deck for repair and maintenance, and further to move other heavy equipment within the well deck and third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage) areas.

(3) Emergency Cargo Handling System. The Emergency Cargo Handling System is a hoisting device which functionally interfaces with the forklifts in the cargo holds. The emergency cargo handling monorail hoist has a one pallet capacity in holds 9 and 10. These hoists are used to transfer pallets from the cargo compartments to the main deck if an elevator failure occurs. Holds 4 and 5 do not have the Emergency Cargo Handling System, as the two elevators which service these two holds are completely independent of each other and they provide dual capability.

14. Ramps and Stern Gate:

a. Ramps. There are three basic ramps aboard this ship: the fixed, hinged and portable ramps. The angles indicated below for ramps may slightly differ when the ship is in ballast condition.

(1) Fixed Ramps. There are three fixed ramps, one between the hangar deck and the flight deck, one between the third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage area) and the hangar deck and one between the well deck and the third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage area).

(a) Hangar Deck. This ramp is the High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) ramp which is 129 feet long and 8 feet 10 inches wide. The angle between this ramp and the horizontal will not exceed 13.3 degrees. This ramp leads to the flight deck. The maximum moving load is 7,500 pounds.

(b) Third Deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage). This ramp is 72 feet long and 14 feet wide and leads to the hangar deck. The angle between this ramp and the horizontal at frame 73 will not exceed 15 degrees. The angle of the knuckle at frame 82 will not exceed 11.1 degrees. The maximum moving load for vehicles is 43,000 pounds.

(c) Well Deck. This ramp is 58 feet long and 50 feet wide and leads to the third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage). The angle between this ramp and the horizontal at frame 91 will not exceed 15 degrees. The angle of the knuckle at frame 84 will not exceed 11.1 degrees. The maximum moving load for vehicles is 140,000 pounds.

(2) Hinged Ramp. There is one hinged ramp between the first platform (Lower Vehicle Stowage area) and third deck (Upper Vehicle Stowage area).

(a) Ramp Under-stowage. This ramp may be under-stowed within the limitations set forth on the area diagrams.

(b) Ramp Overstow. This ramp may be overstowed when in the up and locked position or in the down position. (See Lessons Learned #14)

(c) Ramp Characteristics. This ramp is 48 feet 6 inches long by 13 feet wide. The angle between the ramp and horizontal will not exceed 15 degrees. In the lowered position the ramp is designed for the maximum weight of 35,000lbs. In the raised and locked position, the ramp has the same structural strength as the third deck.

b. The stern gate consists of two gates: an upper gate that swings out and up, and a lower gate that swings out and down. The stern gate is a hinged watertight closure located at the stern. It opens to permit air cushion landing craft (LCACís) to launch from or enter into the dry well deck or to permit conventional landing craft or LCACís to launch from or enter into the flooded well deck when the ship is ballasted down.

c. Portable ramp. There is one sideport ramp that can service both the starboard or port sideports. Vehicles and cargo can embark/debark using this ramp but cannot exceed 125" in height or 129" width. The weight is restricted to 47,000lbs.

15. SHIP DOCKING/BERTHING INFORMATION:

a. The deck edge aircraft elevators extend 45 feet beyond the port and starboard sides of the ship. When at the hangar deck level, the bottom edge of the elevators are 27 feet above the designer's water line. Thus if the ship is to be moored port or starboard side to the pier, any obstructions on the pier which may interfere with the elevator must be taken into consideration.

b. Camels are required to keep the ship away from the pier for ongoing cleaning and painting of the ship's sides. Camels should be no wider than eight feet, in order to allow use of the side port vehicle ramp.