News

Tracking Number:  240584

Title:  "Accession by France to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty." On August 3, 1992 in a ceremony at the State Department in Washington, DC, France formally acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. (920810)

Date:  19920810

Text:
US DEPARTMENT OF STATE DISPATCH PUBLISHED BY THE BUREAU OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS VOLUME 3, NUMBER 32, AUGUST 10, 1992

Accession by France to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty

Statement released by the Office of the Assistant Secretary/Spokesman Washington, DC August 3, 1992

On Monday, August 3, 1992, in a ceremony at the State Department in Washington, DC, France formally acceded to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). The United States warmly welcomes this action by the Government of France, which affirms, in a legally binding manner, its commitment to prevent the further spread of nuclear weapons. French adherence to the NPT underlines the continued vitality of this treaty, which now has more than 150 parties. With China's adherence to the NPT on March 9, 1992, all of the nuclear weapon states identified by that treaty are now parties. The United States attaches tremendous importance to the NPT, which is the cornerstone of the international nuclear non-proliferation regime. The NPT's success reflects the overwhelming international consensus against nuclear weapons proliferation, as well as broad support for the role of International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards in verifying the treaty's non-proliferation undertakings. We believe that continued strong international support for the NPT will contribute to the achievement of its indefinite extension in 1995-a goal to which the United States is committed. France's adherence to the NPT comes at a time when cooperation on non-proliferation has become a central element in the entire post-Cold War structure of international security. France's action will encourage adherence by those few members of the international community who remain outside the NPT. It will reinforce the commitments recently made by China, the newly emerging states of the former Soviet Union, and others as we move forward to the 1995 NPT extension conference. It strengthens the regime which makes possible international cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and reinforces a long tradition of cooperation among France, the United States, and others on non-proliferation and other arms control issues. France's decision to join the NPT marks a true milestone.

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