News

USIS Washington 
File

14 May 1998

UNITED NATIONS REPORT, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 1998

(India, Iraq, Sudan, Cyprus) (2470)



"A WORLD OF NEWS FROM THE WORLD ORGANIZATION"



Daily Highlights

Wednesday, 13 May, 1998



This daily news round-up is prepared by the Central News Section of
the Office of Communications and of Public Information at the United
Nations.


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-- UN Secretary-General and General Assembly President express
disappointment at India's latest nuclear tests.


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UN SECRETARY-GENERAL AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT EXPRESS
DISAPPOINTMENT AT INDIA'S LATEST NUCLEAR TESTS.


United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan has said he is "deeply
disturbed" by India's announcement that it conducted two more nuclear
tests on Wednesday.


India carried out three underground nuclear tests on Monday.



In a statement issued by his Spokesman, the Secretary-General noted
India's announcement that Wednesday's tests were expected to complete
the series and its qualified offer to adhere to some of the
undertakings of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)
selectively.


The Secretary-General said he continued to look forward to the
unequivocal assurance of India and all other States that the
international community's norm on nuclear testing and
non-proliferation would be adhered to, in order that progress towards
nuclear disarmament - - a common desire of all States and peoples --
can be achieved as soon as possible.


The President of the UN General Assembly, Hennadiy Udovenko of
Ukraine, expressed "dismay and disappointment" at the series of
underground nuclear tests conducted by India.


In a statement issued by his spokesman, Mr. Udovenko said in recent
years there have been encouraging signs in the field of nuclear non-
proliferation and nuclear disarmament. With the virtual cessation of
nuclear testing and the landmark conclusion of the CTBT, the
international community sent an unambiguous message as to the future
of nuclear non-proliferation.


During its current session, the General Assembly had reaffirmed its
commitment to creating a nuclear-weapon-free world and welcomed recent
unilateral, bilateral and multilateral steps by States to promote the
regime of nuclear non-proliferation. Regrettably, the spokesman said,
the latest series of tests ran contrary to that positive trend. The
Assembly President would like to emphasize the need to maintain the
international momentum to promote nuclear disarmament.


Meanwhile, India's Permanent Representative to the United Nations, K.
Sharma, said in a UN Radio interview on Wednesday that he did not
think his country's five nuclear tests -- its first since 1974 -- were
provocative. "There's nothing provocative about not testing for 24, 25
years," he said. "India has been a model of restraint and all that in
an environment where we have a fair amount of nuclear promiscuity
around us."


Ambassador Sharma said it was bad and destabilizing for the region to
have a billion people in a continental land mass the size of India, in
a "heavily nuclearized environment", feeling insecure. He said India
reiterated its offer to consider adhering to some of the undertakings
in the CTBT. "This is a very forward position because we have had
problems with the CTBT," he added.


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