News

USIS Washington 
File

15 May 1998

TEXT: UN SECURITY COUNCIL DEPLORES INDIA NUCLEAR TESTS

(Urges India to refrain from further tests) (730)



Washington -- The U.N. Security Council May 14 condemned the nuclear
tests conducted by India and urged India to refrain from any further
tests, according to a UNSC press release.


In a statement read by UNSC President Njuguna M. Mahugu (Kenya), the
Council said "Such testing was contrary to the de facto moratorium on
the test of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, and to
global nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament efforts. It
also expressed its concern at the effects of that development on
regional peace and stability," the press release said.


Following are the texts of the UNSC press release and presidential
statement:


(Begin texts)



14 May 1998



Press Release



SECURITY COUNCIL DEPLORES NUCLEAR TESTS CONDUCTED BY INDIA



In Presidential Statement, Urges India to Refrain from Further Tests



The Security Council this morning deplored the three underground
nuclear tests conducted by India on 11 May and the two further tests
conducted on 13 May despite overwhelming international concern and
protests.


Through a statement read by its President, Njuguna M. Mahugu (Kenya),
the Council urged India to refrain from any further tests. Such
testing was contrary to the de facto moratorium on the test of nuclear
weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, and to global nuclear
non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament efforts. It also expressed
its concern at the effects of that development on regional peace and
stability.


The Council affirmed the crucial importance of the Treaty on the
Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the Comprehensive
Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and appealed to India, and all other
States which had not yet done so, to become parties to those
instruments without delay and without conditions. India was also
encouraged to participate in the proposed negotiations for a fissile
material cut-off treaty in Geneva, with a view to reaching early
agreement.


It underlined that the sources of tension in South Asia should only be
resolved through dialogue and not by military build-up. It urged
States to exercise maximum restraint, with a view to preventing an
escalation in the arms race, in particular with regard to nuclear
weapons and their delivery systems, and to preserving peace in the
region. It reiterated that the proliferation of weapons of mass
destruction constituted a threat to international peace and security.


The meeting, which was called to order at 12:25 p.m., was adjourned at
12:27 p.m.


PRESIDENTIAL STATEMENT



The text of the presidential statement, which will be issued as
document S/PRST/1998/12, reads as follows:


"The Security Council strongly deplores the three underground nuclear
tests that India conducted on 11 May 1998, and the two further tests
conducted on 13 May 1998 despite overwhelming international concern
and protests. The Council strongly urges India to refrain from any
further tests. It is of the view that such testing is contrary to the
de facto moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons or other nuclear
explosive devices, and to global efforts towards nuclear
non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament. The Council also expresses
its concern at the effects of this development on peace and stability
in the region.


"The Security Council affirms the crucial importance of the Treaty on
the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the Comprehensive
Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The Council appeals to India, and all other
States which have not yet done so, to become parties to the NPT, and
to the CTBT without delay and without conditions. The Council also
encourages India to participate, in a positive spirit, in the proposed
negotiations with other States for a fissile material cut-off treaty
in Geneva with a view to reaching early agreement.


"With a view to preventing an escalation in the arms race, in
particular with regard to nuclear weapons and their delivery systems,
and to preserving peace in the region, the Security Council urges
States to exercise maximum restraint. The Council underlines that the
sources of tension in South Asia should only be resolved through
dialogue and not by military build-up.


"The Security Council reiterates the statement by its President on 31
January 1992 (S/23500) which stated, inter alia, that the
proliferation of all weapons of mass destruction constitutes a threat
to international peace and security."


(End texts)