News


Tracking Number:  204535

Title:  "Bush Says Iraq May Still Have Concealed Missiles." President Bush's November 15 letter to Congress. (911118)

Translated Title:  Irak puede tener aun misiles ocultos, dice Bush. (911118)
Date:  19911118

Text:
*TXT106

11/18/91 HBUSH SAYS IRAQ MAY STILL HAVE CONCEALED MISSILES SH(Text: Bush November 15 letter to Congress) (1220)

TWashington -- Iraq is continuing "to use concealment, deception, and denial of unrestricted access to prevent or inhibit U.N. (weapons) inspections," President Bush says.

In a letter to congressional leaders November 15, Bush said Iraq "has greatly misrepresented the scope and size of its chemical, biological and missile programs." While the U.N. Special Commission has destroyed 60 long-range Iraqi missiles, he said, "we have reason to believe that several hundred others remain unaccounted for and unacknowledged by Iraq."

The president said the United States also "remains concerned that Iraq has not yet carried out its obligations under previous (U.N.) Security Council resolutions to return all detained Kuwaiti and third-country nationals."

Following is text of the Bush letter:

(begin text)

Consistent with the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution (Public Law 102-1), and as part of my continuing effort to keep the Congress fully informed, I am again reporting on the status of efforts to obtain compliance by Iraq with the resolutions adopted by the U.N. Security Council.

Since I last reported on September 16, 1991, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the U.N. Special Commission created under Resolution 687 have continued to conduct inspections and other activities related to Iraqi weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles. Iraq has continued to use concealment, deception, and denial of unrestricted access to prevent or inhibit U.N. inspections. Despite these efforts, the U.N. teams have uncovered additional evidence of these weapons systems.

In particular, inspections carried out during this period found unambiguous evidence that Iraq had a comprehensive program, with a very large technical work force and infrastructure, to design and build nuclear weapons. Iraq's determination to prevent disclosure of this evidence was demonstrated by the well-publicized events of September 23-26, during which Iraqi authorities unsuccessfully attempted to prevent a U.N. team from removing key documents concerning the nuclear-weapons program and Iraqi procurements from foreign sources.

Similarly, U.N. inspections during this period have shown that Iraq has greatly misrepresented the scope and size of its chemical, biological, and missile programs. Two additional undeclared types of nerve agents have been discovered at Samarra, and stocks of chemical munitions, which far exceed the amounts declared by Iraq, have been identified in a number of locations. More than 60 long-range Iraqi missiles have been destroyed by the Special Commission, but we have reason to believe that several hundred others remain unaccounted for and unacknowledged by Iraq.

The IAEA and the Special Commission are continuing their efforts to identify and destroy these Iraqi programs. Commission Chairman Ekeus travelled to Baghdad to underscore the determination of the United Nations to carry out its mission. U.N. inspections continue, and German helicopters (on loan to the Special Commission to facilitate inspections) have been used effectively. In addition, on October 11, the Security Council adopted Resolution 715, approving long-term monitoring plans submitted by the Special Commission and the IAEA to continue international inspection of Iraqi activities that could lead to future programs of this type.

The United States has assisted the United Nations in its activities, including the conduct of U-2 surveillance flights and the provision of intelligence from various sources, and will continue to do so. It should be noted, however, that a problem persists with regard to financing the international inspection teams.

Significant further progress has been made since my last report toward implementation of the resolution of the Security Council concerning compensation of the victims of the unlawful invasion and occupation of Kuwait. The second session of the Governing Council of the new U.N. Compensation Commission met from October 14-18 in Geneva and adopted arrangements for ensuring payments to the Compensation Fund from future Iraqi oil shipments (at such time as the Security Council lifts the current sanctions). The Governing Council also adopted further guidance on certain issues concerning the criteria adopted earlier on the claims of individuals for up to $100,000. The executive secretary of the commission is continuing to fill out his staff with the technical experts necessary to review claims and to collect revenues from Iraqi oil exports. The Governing Council has scheduled meetings in November, January, and March to organize the processing of these individual claims and to adopt criteria for handling other types of claims, including those for environmental damage and loss of natural resources.

In the meantime, the U.N. Security Council has taken further action to permit shipment of food and other humanitarian supplies for the Iraqi people in a manner consistent with the council's previous decisions. On September 19, the council adopted Resolution 712, which approved procedures for the sale of up to $1,600 million of Iraqi oil with the proceeds to be used for the Compensation Commission, other U.N. activities related to Iraq, and humanitarian relief under U.N. control to ensure its equitable distribution in Iraq. Unfortunately, Iraq has not yet indicated that it will accept the regime established by Resolution 712 for the provision of such humanitarian relief. At the same time, Saddam Hussein's government is hoarding supplies of food, which it distributes only to favored groups. As a result, the government of Iraq must bear full responsibility for any suffering that may result from shortfalls in food and other essential supplies during the coming months.

The United States remains concerned that Iraq has not yet carried out its obligations under previous Security Council resolutions to return all detained Kuwaiti and third-country nationals. On March 7, Iraq agreed to cooperates with the International Committee of the Red Cross on repatriation of prisoners and civilian detainees. As recently as the October 16-17 Tripartite Commission meeting in Geneva, Iraq accepted the responsibility to respond to appeals for the release of, or information about, the Kuwait list of over 2,100 persons. We have raised this humanitarian issue with the Baghdad authorities on more than one occasion. We also remain concerned about Iraq's failure to return all stolen Kuwaiti property and military equipment (including Hawk air defense missiles), as it is obligated to do under the various Security Council resolutions.

During the period since my last report, the Iraqis continued to violate Kuwait's northern border to retrieve equipment left behind. We will carefully monitor Iraq's actions in this regard and remain prepared to take appropriate steps if the situation requires.

As I stated in previous reports, the United States remains concerned about the situation of the Kurds and other population groups that have been the object of repressive measures by the Iraqi government. Once again, we have informed the government of Iraq that, in concert with our coalition partners, we will continue to monitor carefully the treatment of Iraqi citizens, and that together we remain prepared to take appropriate steps if the situation requires. To this end, we will continue to maintain an appropriate level of forces in the region for as long as required by the situation in Iraq.

I remain grateful for the support of the Congress for these efforts, and I look forward to continued cooperation toward achieving our mutual objectives.

(end text) NNNN


File Identification:  11/18/91, TX-106; 11/18/91, AR-115; 11/18/91, EP-108; 11/18/91, EU-103; 11/18/91, NE-109; 11/18/91, NA-107; 11/19/91, AS-202; 11/19/91, AX-206; 11/19/91, NA-208
Product Name:  Wireless File
Product Code:  WF
Languages:  Arabic; Spanish
Keywords:  BUSH, GEORGE/Foreign Relations: Near East & South Asia; IRAQ-US RELATIONS; IRAQ/Defense & Military; PERSIAN GULF WAR; INSPECTIONS; ARMS CONTROL VERIFICATION; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; FRAUDS; INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY; UNITED
Document Type:  TXT
Thematic Codes:  1NE; 1UN; 1AC
Target Areas:  AR; EA; EU; NE; AF
PDQ Text Link:  204535; 204806