News

ACCESSION NUMBER:264337

FILE ID:TXT201

DATE:01/26/93

TITLE:CLINTON -- U.S. WILL STAY WITH IRAQ POLICY (01/26/93)

TEXT:*93012601.TXT

CLINTON -- U.S. WILL STAY WITH IRAQ POLICY



(VOA Editorial)  (400)

(Following is an editorial, broadcast by the Voice of America January 26,

reflecting the views of the U.S. government.)



The new administration of President Bill Clinton has made it clear in

both words and deeds that it will continue to insist that Iraq comply with

U.N. Security Council resolutions.  The day after President Clinton took

office, an Iraqi missile battery used its radar in a hostile manner to

track American planes patrolling the "no-fly" zone in northern Iraq.  In

accordance with previously established rules of engagement, the American

planes attacked the Iraqi missile site.  A similar incident took place the

next day.



President Clinton stressed that United States policy on Iraq will not

change.  "It is the American policy," he said, "and that is what we are

going to stay with."



Secretary of State Warren Christopher also stressed the continuity of U.S.

policy toward Iraq.  "The United States intends to protect our pilots in

the 'no-fly' zone," he said.  "The Iraqis know perfectly well what it takes

to comply with the U.N. resolutions and with the establishment of the

'no-fly' zones."   Secretary Christopher said the U.S. attack on the

missile site shows the determination with which the Clinton administration

will pursue its policy toward Iraq.



The United States and other members of the international coalition have

established "no-fly" zones in both northern and southern Iraq to protect

coalition pilots helping to monitor Iraqi compliance with U.N. Security

1ouncil Resolution 688.  This resolution demands that Iraq cease

immediately its repression of the Iraqi people.  Earlier this month, after

repeated Iraqi violations of the "no-fly" zones, officials of the United

States, Britain, France and Russia issued a formal warning to Iraq.  When

the warning was ignored, coalition forces took military action.  The

coalition members have made it clear that further actions will depend on

the Iraqi regime's behavior.



As President Clinton said in his inaugural address on January 20, America

"will not shrink from the challenges" it faces in a changing world but will

work with its friends and allies to shape change.  President Clinton said

that when America's "vital interests are challenged, or the will and

conscience of the international community is defied, we will act -- with

peaceful diplomacy whenever possible, with force when necessary."



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