News

ACCESSION

ACCESSION NUMBER:263088

FILE ID:POL504

DATE:01/15/93

TITLE:BUSH WARNS IRAQ TO PERMIT LANDING OF U.N. AIRCRAFT (01/15/93)

TEXT:*93011504.POL

BUSH WARNS IRAQ TO PERMIT LANDING OF U.N. AIRCRAFT



(Says "sufficient warnings" have been given)  (560)

By Alexander M. Sullivan

USIA White House Correspondent

Washington -- President Bush warned Saddam Hussein January 15 to permit

United Nations aircraft into Iraq at once or face the consequences.

1

Declaring that Baghdad had failed to give clearance to a U.N. aircraft

carrying United Nations inspectors, Bush said he and other members of the

Persian Gulf coalition "are firm in demanding compliance with United

Nations resolutions."



Bush would not say what action the coalition might take if Iraq refuses to

comply (by 2100 GMT), but he added, "sufficient warnings have been given."



The president made his brief statement as he was departing to spend a long

weekend -- his last in office -- at the presidential retreat, Camp David,

in Maryland's nearby Catoctin Mountains.



"We continue to monitor Iraq's behavior for compliance with United Nations

resolutions," Bush told reporters.  "We continue to demand access by United

Nations aircraft for inspections in Iraq.  The United Nations has made it

clear to the Iraqis that the United Nations inspection teams are prepared

to resume their work and have the right to fly U.N. aircraft into that

country at any time."



The president said a U.N. flight scheduled January 15 "did not receive

clearance to enter Iraqi air space."  He said the United Nations "has

informed Saddam Hussein that if flight clearance is not granted by 4 p.m.

Eastern Standard Time today (2100 GMT), Iraq will be in non-compliance"

with the terms of the cease-fire ending the Persian Gulf war.



Bush said coalition members "are firm in demanding compliance with United

Nations resolutions."  Asked if he meant to say that coalition members

would again bomb Iraqi targets, as they had January 13, Bush told a

questioner "I never say what we do do or don't do in terms of compelling

compliance."  He added that "sufficient warnings have been granted" to the

Iraqis.  "They know what they must do," he said.  "This is not just the

United States....It's a strong coalition whose determination has not

diminished in any single way."



Resolutions passed by the U.N. Security Council declare that Iraq must

submit to U.N. inspections and to destruction of its weapons of mass

destruction under United Nations auspices.  One of the provocations leading

up to the January 13 air strike on surface-to-air missile sites below the

32nd parallel was Iraq's refusal to allow access to a previous U.N.

inspection team.  Iraq's ambassador to the U.N. had announced late January

13 that Baghdad henceforth would comply with U.N. access demands.



Bush termed the January 13 raid "a success" which "seriously depleted Iraq's

air defense system" south of the 32nd parallel, in the "no-fly" zone

imposed to protect Shia Muslims from oppression by the Baghdad regime.  The

president added that "the residual aspects of that mission" are being

examined; he did not elaborate.



The president apparently went over damage assessment reports earlier in the

day, during a meeting with Secretary of State Eagleburger.  Although

Eagleburger was the only announced visitor, Defense Secretary Cheney and

Brent Scowcroft, Bush's national security affairs adviser, were seen

joining the meeting, Cheney carrying a portfolio-sized case such as those

used to hold photographic blow-ups.



NNNN



.