News


ACCESSION NUMBER:00000
FILE ID:96041704.EEA
DATE:04/17/96
TITLE:17-04-96  TEXT:  U.S.-JAPAN JOINT DECLARATION ON SECURITY

TEXT:
(U.S., Japan reaffirm "Alliance for the 21st Century") (2280)

Tokyo -- In signing the U.S.-Japan Joint Declaration on Security April
17, President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto
reaffirmed their strong determination, on the eve of the 21st century,
to build on the successful history of security cooperation and to work
hand-in-hand to secure peace and prosperity for future generations.

According to the Declaration, the president and the prime minister
agreed that the three legs of the U.S.-Japan relationship -- security,
political, and economic -- are based on shared values and interests
and rest on the mutual confidence embodied in the Treaty of Mutual
Cooperation and Security.

In the Declaration, the two leaders agreed that both governments will
make every effort to deal with various issues related to the presence
and status of U.S. forces in Japan. They also agreed to make further
efforts to enhance mutual understanding between U.S. forces and local
Japanese communities.

"In particular," the Declaration says, "with respect to Okinawa, where
U.S. facilities and areas are highly concentrated, the President and
the Prime Minister reconfirmed their determination to carry out steps
to consolidate, realign, and reduce U.S. facilities and areas
consistent with the objectives of the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and
Security."

"The President and the Prime Minister agreed that continued U.S.
military presence is also essential for preserving peace and stability
in the Asia-Pacific region," the Declaration says. "The leaders shared
the common recognition that the U.S. Japan security relationship forms
an essential pillar which supports the positive regional engagement of
the U.S."

Following is the official text of the Declaration:

(begin official text)

U.S.-JAPAN JOINT DECLARATION ON SECURITY

ALLIANCE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY


1. Today, the President and the Prime Minister celebrated one of the
most successful bilateral relationships in history. The leaders took
pride in the profound and positive contribution this relationship has
made to world peace and regional stability and prosperity. The strong
Alliance between the United States and Japan helped ensure peace and
security in the Asia-Pacific region during the Cold War. Our Alliance
continues to underlie the dynamic economic growth in this region. The
two leaders agreed that the future security and prosperity of both
United States and Japan are tied inextricably to the future of the
Asia-Pacific region.

The benefits of peace and prosperity that spring from the Alliance are
due not only to the commitments of the two governments, but also to
the contributions of the Japanese and American people who have shared
the burden of securing freedom and democracy. The President and the
Prime Minister expressed their profound gratitude to those who sustain
the Alliance, especially those Japanese communities that host U.S.
Forces, and those Americans who, far from home, devote themselves to
the defense of peace and freedom.

2. For more than a year, the two governments have conducted an
intensive review of the evolving political and security environment of
the Asia-Pacific region and of various aspects of the U.S.-Japan
security relationship. On the basis of this review, the President and
the Prime Minister reaffirmed their commitment to the profound common
values that guide our national policies: the maintenance of freedom,
the pursuit of democracy, and respect for human rights. They agreed
that the foundations for our cooperation remain firm, and that this
partnership will remain vital in the twenty-first century.

THE REGIONAL OUTLOOK

3. Since the end of the Cold War, the possibility of global armed
conflict has receded. The last few years have seen expanded political
and security dialogue among countries of the region. Respect for
democratic principles is growing. Prosperity is more widespread than
at any other time in history, and we are witnessing the emergence of
an Asia-Pacific community. The Asia-Pacific region has become the most
dynamic area of the globe. At the same time, instability and
uncertainty persist in the region. Tensions continue on the Korean
Peninsula. There are still heavy concentrations of military force,
including nuclear arsenals. Unresolved territorial disputes, potential
regional conflicts, and the proliferation of weapons of mass
destruction and their means of delivery all constitute sources of
instability.

THE U.S.-JAPAN ALLIANCE AND THE TREATY OF MUTUAL COOPERATION AND
SECURITY

4. The President and the Prime Minister underscored the importance of
promoting stability in this region and dealing with the security
challenges facing both countries.

In this regard, the President and the Prime Minister reiterated the
significant value of the Alliance between the United States and Japan.
They reaffirmed that the U.S. Japan security relationship, based on
the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security between the United
States of America and Japan, remains the cornerstone for achieving
common security objectives, and for maintaining a stable and
prosperous environment for the Asia-Pacific region as we enter the
twenty-first Century.

(a) The Prime Minister confirmed Japan's fundamental defense policy as
articulated in its new National Defense Program Outline adopted in
November, 1995, which underscored that the Japanese defense
capabilities should play appropriate roles in the security environment
after the Cold War. The President and the Prime Minister agreed that
the most effective framework for the defense of Japan is close defense
cooperation between the two countries. This cooperation is based on a
combination of appropriate defense capabilities for the Self-Defense
Forces of Japan and the U.S.-Japan security arrangements. The leaders
again confirmed that U.S. deterrence under the Treaty of Mutual
Cooperation and Security remains the guarantee for Japan's security.

(b) The President and the Prime Minister agreed that continued U.S.
military presence is also essential for preserving peace and stability
in the Asia-Pacific region. The leaders shared the common recognition
that the U.S. Japan security relationship forms an essential pillar
which supports the positive regional engagement of the U.S.

The President emphasized the U.S. commitment to the defense of Japan
as well as to peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region. He noted
that there has been some adjustment of U.S. forces in the Asia-Pacific
region since the end of the Cold War. On the basis of a thorough
assessment, the United States reaffirmed that meeting its commitments
in the prevailing security environment requires the maintenance of its
current force structure of about 100,000 forward deployed military
personnel in the region, including about the current level in Japan.

(c) The Prime Minister welcomed the U.S. determination to remain a
stable and steadfast presence in the region. He reconfirmed that Japan
would continue appropriate contributions for the maintenance of U.S.
forces in Japan, such as through the provision of facilities and areas
in accordance with the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security and
Host Nation Support. The President expressed U.S. appreciation for
Japan's contributions, and welcomed the conclusion of the new Special
Measures Agreement which provides financial support for U.S. forces
stationed in Japan.

BILATERAL COOPERATION UNDER THE U.S.-JAPAN SECURITY RELATIONSHIP

5. The President and the Prime Minister, with the objective of
enhancing the credibility of this vital security relationship, agreed
to undertake efforts to advance cooperation in the following areas.

(a) Recognizing that close bilateral defense cooperation is a central
element of the U.S.-Japan alliance, both governments agreed that
continued close consultation is essential. Both governments will
further enhance the exchange of information and views on the
international situation, in particular the Asia-Pacific region. At the
same time, in response to the changes which may arise in the
international security environment, both governments will continue to
consult closely on defense policies and military postures, including
the U.S. force structure in Japan, which will best meet their
requirements.

(b) The President and the Prime Minister agreed to initiate a review
of the 1978 Guidelines for U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation to build
upon the close working relationship already established between the
United States and Japan.

The two leaders agreed on the necessity to promote bilateral policy
coordination, including studies on bilateral cooperation in dealing
with situations that may emerge in the areas surrounding Japan and
which will have an important influence on the peace and security of
Japan.

(c) The President and the Prime Minister welcomed the April 15, 1996
signature of the Agreement Between the Government of the United States
of America and the Government of Japan Concerning Reciprocal Provision
of Logistic Support, Supplies and Services Between the Armed Forces of
the United States of America and the Self-Defense Forces of Japan, and
expressed their hope that this Agreement will further promote the
bilateral cooperative relationship.

(d) Noting the importance of interoperability in all facets of
cooperation between the U.S. forces and the Self-Defense Forces of
Japan, the two governments will enhance mutual exchange in the areas
of technology and equipment, including bilateral cooperative research
and development of equipment such as the support fighter (F-2).

(e) The two governments recognized that the proliferation of weapons
of mass destruction and their means of delivery has important
implications for their common security. They will work together to
prevent proliferation and will continue to cooperate in the ongoing
study on ballistic missile defense.

6. The President and the Prime Minister recognized that the broad
support and understanding of the Japanese people are indispensable for
the smooth stationing of U.S. forces in Japan, which is the core
element of the U.S.-Japan security arrangements. The two leaders
agreed that both governments will make every effort to deal with
various issues related to the presence and status of U.S. forces. They
also agreed to make further efforts to enhance mutual understanding
between U.S. forces and local Japanese communities.

In particular, with respect to Okinawa, where U.S. facilities and
areas are highly concentrated, the President and the Prime Minister
reconfirmed their determination to carry out steps to consolidate,
realign, and reduce U.S. facilities and areas consistent with the
objectives of the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security. In this
respect, the two leaders took satisfaction in the significant progress
which has been made so far through the Special Action Committee on
Okinawa (SACO) and welcomed the far reaching measures outlined in the
SACO Interim Report of April 15, 1996. They expressed their firm
commitment to achieve a successful conclusion of the SACO process by
November 1996.

REGIONAL COOPERATION

7. The President and the Prime Minister agreed that the two
governments will jointly and individually strive to achieve a more
peaceful and stable security environment in the Asia-Pacific region.
In this regard, the two leaders recognized that the engagement of the
United States in the region, supported by the U.S.-Japan security
relationship, constitutes the foundation for such efforts.

The two leaders stressed the importance of peaceful resolution of
problems in the region. They emphasized that it is extremely important
for the stability and prosperity of the region that China play a
positive and constructive role, and, in this context, stressed the
interest of both countries in furthering cooperation with China.
Russia's ongoing process of reform contributes to regional and global
stability, and merits continued encouragement and cooperation. The
leaders also stated that full normalization of Japan-Russia relations
based on the Tokyo Declaration is important to peace and stability in
the Asia-Pacific region. They noted also that stability on the Korean
Peninsula is vitally important to the United States and Japan and
reaffirmed that both countries will continue to make every effort in
this regard, in close cooperation with the Republic of Korea.

The President and the Prime Minister reaffirmed that the two
governments will continue working jointly and with other countries in
the region to further develop multilateral regional security dialogues
and cooperation mechanisms such as the ASEAN Regional Forum, and
eventually, security dialogues regarding Northeast Asia.

GLOBAL COOPERATION

8. The President and the Prime Minister recognized that the Treaty of
Mutual Cooperation and Security is the core of the U.S.-Japan
Alliance, and underlies the mutual confidence that constitutes the
foundation for bilateral cooperation on global issues.

The President and the Prime Minister agreed that the two governments
will strengthen their cooperation in support of the United Nations and
other international organizations through activities such as
peacekeeping and humanitarian relief operations.

Both governments will coordinate their policies and cooperate on
issues such as arms control and disarmament, including acceleration of
the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) negotiations and the
prevention of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and
their means of delivery.

The two leaders agreed that cooperation in the United Nations and
APEC, and on issues such as the North Korean nuclear problem, the
Middle East peace process, and the peace implementation process in the
former Yugoslavia, helps to build the kind of world that promotes our
shared interests and values.

CONCLUSION

9. In concluding, the President and the Prime Minister agreed that the
three legs of the U.S.-Japan -- relationship security, political, and
economic -- are based on shared values and interests and rest on the
mutual confidence embodied in the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and
Security. The President and the Prime Minister reaffirmed their strong
determination, on the eve of the twenty-first century, to build on the
successful history of security cooperation and to work hand-in-hand to
secure peace and prosperity for future generations.

April 17, 1996 Tokyo

Prime Minister of Japan 
President of the United States

(end official text)
NNNN

.