News

NEWS AND VIEWS

Summaries of and links to online news reports and commentaries.

RUSSIA WILL NEVER BE FIRST TO USE NUKES--
UNLESS IT HAS TO 
http://www.russia.net/ria/dr/1997/05/15-1-4.htm#150514
V. Kunin. RIA Novosti, May 14
A statement that Russia may recur to nukes "if it is
driven into a corner", recently made by Boris Berezovsky,
federal Security Council Vice-Secretary, did not come as a
thunderbolt, and so the alarm it caused in certain Western
countries appears groundless.

Boris Yeltsin's Nuclear Monologue
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-srv/WPlate/1997-05/14/011L-051497-idx.html
EDITORIAL The Washington Post 
Wednesday, May 14 1997; Page A20
"WHAT IS BORIS Yeltsin doing running on about the conditions in
which he would or would not fire nuclear weapons? This is a
difficult question to raise at any time, fraught as it is with signals that
different parties are bound to read differently. Certainly it is not a
necessary or helpful question to be agitating at this strategically calm
post-Cold War moment. ... Both sides, for instance,  could take off
alert the warheads they still have available to  program in minutes 
against each other. "

On visit to U.S., Russia's defense minister supports Start II
http://www2.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/97/May/14/international/RUSS14.htm
(Philadelphia Inquirer) 14 May 1997
WASHINGTON -- Russian Defense Minister Igor Rodionov 
said yesterday that he supports the START II nuclear arms 
reduction treaty, even though it has not been ratified
by the Russian parliament. ``I'm deeply convinced we can 
ensure the security of our country with a lesser number of 
missiles and warheads,'' Rodionov said at a Pentagon
briefing also attended by Defense Secretary William S. Cohen.

Russia considers military use of international space station 
http://www.flatoday.com:80/space/today/051497h.htm
(Space Today) 14 May 1997
The Russian government ordered its negotiators last 
month to seek a letter of intent with U.S. officials "on a 
possibility for Russia and the United States to use their 
own modules of the station in the interests of national 
security," Nezavisimaya Gazeta newspaper said in
a front-page report.

Rocky road in space for U.S., Russia 
Mir’s problems  trouble NASA 
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/74773.asp
By Marcia Dunn ASSOCIATED PRESS 
 “One hates to get too far into the marriage analogy,
but one might say the honeymoon is over and now they’re
ready for a rough-and-tumble marriage,” said Marcia Smith,
a specialist in space policy for the Congressional Research
Service. “Now, maybe, both sides will see their partners as
they are rather than as they wish they were.”

Air and Space Museum Announces `Space Race' Exhibition 
http://www.flatoday.com:80/space/today/051497g.htm
(Space Today) 14 May 1997
Among the unique objects on view is a camera from the 
recently declassified Corona spy satellite program.

Nations Agree to Pact  Granting Nuclear Inspectors
More Access, Information
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-srv/WPlate/1997-05/15/147L-051597-idx.html
Thomas W. Lippman Washington Post, May 15 1997; Page A24
" ... the United States and more than 60 other countries 
have agreed on new rules aimed at giving inspectors
more information and access to more suspected nuclear sites.
The 35-member board of directors of the International Atomic
Energy Agency is to vote on approval of the new rules at a meeting
today in Vienna..."