Index

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 4, No. 208, Part I, 26 October 2000

DIVERS RECOVER FOUR BODIES FROM 'KURSK' WRECK... Following
the cutting of a hole in the hull of the "Kursk" nuclear
submarine (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 25 October 2000), Russian
divers recovered four bodies from the vessel before worsening
weather conditions forced them to suspend the recovery
operation on the morning of 26 October. The remains, found in
the eighth and ninth compartments of the submarine, were due
to be flown on 26 October to the naval base at Severomorsk
for identification. Meanwhile, a team of Norwegian divers
continued with efforts to cut a hole into the submarine's
seventh compartment. At total of seven holes have to be cut
for the Russian divers to reach those parts of the submarine
where remains of the 118-strong crew might be found.
According to ITAR-TASS, the weather in the Barents Sea will
not improve until the weekend. JC

...AS NOTE REPORTED FOUND ON ONE CREW MEMBER. Quoting Russian
navy commander Admiral Vladimir Kuroedov, ITAR-TASS reported
on 26 October that a note has been found on one of the four
bodies indicating that at least 23 crew members did not die
instantly after the sinking of the "Kursk." According to the
news agency, one Lieutenant-Captain Kolesnikov had managed to
scribble down shortly after the sinking that "all the crew
from the sixth, seventh, and eighth compartments went over to
the ninth. There are 23 people here. We made this decision as
a result of the accident. None of us can get to the
surface.... I am writing blind." The agency did not explain
how the note had remained legible. Shortly after the sinking
of the "Kursk," there were reports that tapping on the hull
of the submarine could be heard. Later, Russian officials
maintained that most crew members died immediately after an
explosion destroyed the bow of the vessel but that some crew
members might have survived for a while in the back three
compartments (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 15 and 21 August 2000).
JC

Copyright (c) 2000. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free
Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington DC 20036.
http://www.rferl.org