BY ORDER OF THE COMMANDER
AIR FORCE SPACE COMMAND

AFSPCI

"Short Title of Publication Supplemented, i.e., AFI37-160 and AFSPC Supplement Number, i.e., AFSPC1 - Place No Spaces In Title" \* MERGEFORMAT

21-10801

"Date of Supplement - Spell Month Out Completely" \* MERGEFORMAT

17 May 1996

"Series Title"

Maintenance

"Long Title - Type In All Capital Letters"

MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT OF SPACELIFT SYSTEMS

This instruction implements AFPD21-1, Managing Aerospace Equipment Maintenance, and AFI21-108, Maintenance Management of Spacelift Systems. It establishes the maintenance management policy applicable to spacelift systems, facilities, and related components. This instruction specifies the maintenance responsibilities and management procedures for work centers aligned under the Space Launch Squadron (SLS) and applicable Operations Support Squadrons (OSS). This supplement does not apply to Air Force Reserve or Air National Guard units. The reporting requirements in this directive are exempt from licensing in accordance with paragraph 2.11.12. of AFI37-124, The Information Collections and Reports Management Program; Controlling Internal, Public, and Interagency Air Force Information Collections. This instruction implements command guidance on both spacelift and logistics normalization efforts. Units will evolve to the use of the standard and normal logistics and maintenance processes, systems, functions, and philosophies outlined in this instruction. Maintenance personnel must know the requirements of this instruction and allied publications that pertain to their responsibilities. This instruction is consistent with current contracts in support of HQ AFSPC's spacelift mission. Wherever this instruction is inconsistent with current contracts that support AFSPC's mission, the contract shall govern. This instruction is consistent with Air Force Occupational Safety and Health (AFOSH) standards and Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) standards/numbers. The procedures in this instruction may be supplemented at the local level. Changes to the procedures contained in this publication are not authorized without approval of HQ AFSPC Logistics (LG). All maintenance personnel, including those assigned to agencies other than maintenance units, will follow approved AFSPC maintenance policy and guidance in support of spacelift operations.

1. References:

1.1. AF Supplement to DoD I5000.2, Defense Acquisition Management Policies and Procedures.

1.2. AFI21-108, Maintenance Management of Space Systems.

1.3. AFI36-2201, Developing, Managing, and Conducting Training.

1.4. AFI38-101, Instruction for Air Force Organization.

1.5. AFM66-279, Vols. I, II, VI, IX, XI, XIII, XVI, XXVI, and XXVII, Core Automated Maintenance System (CAMS), Introduction to Core Automated Maintenance System, Users Manual.

1.6. AFM23-110, USAF Supply Manual.

1.7. AFPD21-1, Managing Aerospace Equipment Maintenance.

1.8. AFCAT36-2223, USAF Formal Schools.

1.9. AFSPCI21-104, Configuration Management.
1.10. AFSPCI21-105, AFSPC Corrosion Control Program.

1.11. CFETPs (Career Field Education Training Plan): 2M0XX, 21MX, 62XX.

1.12. Eastern and Western Range 127-1, Range Safety Requirements.

1.13. HQ AFSPC Logistics/Civil Engineering CONCEPT OF MAINTENANCE for AFSPC Spacelift Systems, 13 June 94

1.14. Federal Acquisition Regulation, Part 42 (Contract Administration) and Part 46 (Quality Assurance)

1.15. AFPD63-501, Air Force Acquisition Quality Program

1.16. AFSPCI63-501, Quality Assurance Evaluation of Acquisition and Service Contracts

2. Provision for Units Submitting Draft Supplements. Units may develop supplements to this instruction and will submit drafts for approval (before printing) to HQ AFSPC Hardware Maintenance (LGML), 150 Vandenberg St Ste 1105, Peterson AFB CO 80914-4470.

3. Terms Explained:

3.1. Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE). All equipment, excluding Real Property Installed Equipment (RPIE) and flight hardware, that supports the spacelift systems within their intended environment.

3.2. Annual. When used as a requirement, the term "annual" refers to a 12-month interval.

3.3. Anomaly. An unexpected or unplanned condition that does not meet system performance parameters and which cannot be corrected by organizational maintenance resources in accordance with validated procedures. After analysis, an "out-of-family" condition could be declared an anomaly.

3.4. Approval. Approval signifies AFSPC approval/acceptance/coordination IAW AFSPC instructions and Memoranda of Agreements.

3.5. Available/Launch Dependable. Spacelift systems require sustainment of system availability and launch dependability that maximizes operational effectiveness. This occurs without significantly escalating life cycle costs. All launch maintenance activities must directly support system availability and launch dependability.

3.6. Control. Actions conducted by unit personnel at the particular task location to ensure/determine if spacelift system assets are reliable and ready for operation by assuring adherence to technical procedures, general maintenance practices, safety requirements, security guidelines, environmental compliance, and efficient utilization of resources.

3.7. Critical. An item is designated critical if its failure could cause the failure or premature loss of a space asset on the ground, during the ascent, or in orbit, or delay its launch.

3.8. Depot. Provides depot-level support for off-line test equipment (special test equipment not available at the organizational level) to determine acceptability of the component after repair. Provides special skills, such as welding certification, or techniques, such as micro-soldering, required for an item under repair. Provides support-level maintenance normally performed at a location other than the launch complex by USAF depot or contractor personnel.

3.9. Directing. The process of assigning people and guiding them toward the accomplishment of an objective.
3.10. Discrepancy. An unexpected or unplanned condition that does not meet system performance parameters but which can be corrected by organizational maintenance resources in accordance with validated procedures at the unit level.

3.11. Flight Hardware. All physical elements of the spacelift systems that lift off, in contrast to those space system elements that remain on the ground.

3.12. Flight Software. The computer programs that control and operate the spacelift systems after liftoff.

3.13. Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). All equipment items furnished by the government to a contractor.

3.14. Launch Support. Activities performed which support launch processing and launch of spacelift systems.

3.15. Launch Maintenance Management. Optimizes operational capabilities through effective use of assigned personnel, equipment, facilities, hardware, and other Air Force resources required to support mission requirements and ensure system integrity.

3.16. Launch Processing. All activities associated with preparing assets for launch.

3.17. Maintainable. All spacelift systems under the operational control of AFSPC must use USAF organic maintenance practices as defined in the following paragraphs. Interface with USAF maintenance data collection systems, such as Core Automated Maintenance System (CAMS), Reliability and Maintainability Information System (REMIS), and Real Property Records/Civil Engineer (CE) Work Information Management System (WIMS), is required to support spacelift logistics reliability and maintainability objectives.

3.18. Maintenance:

3.18.1. Launch Maintenance. Maintenance functions conducted by USAF or contractor personnel at the launch base in support of operations to attain and maintain the capability to command, control, and execute a spacelift system.

3.18.2. Maintenance Functions. Maintenance functions include: launch base transport, assembly, checkout, preparation, correct maintenance, and preventative maintenance inspections of spacelift vehicles, payloads, space launch complexes, SE and RP/RPIE. It also includes maintenance on other RP and RPIE that support launch activities. All maintenance personnel, including those assigned to other agencies, will follow approved AFSPC maintenance policy and guidance in support of spacelift operations. troubleshoot, remove, replace, and repair, corrective and preventative maintenance, systems build-up, propellant transfer, etc.

3.18.3. Maintenance Policy. Maintenance policy is all HQ USAF, HQ AFSPC, 14 AF, wing, and local written instructions, directives, and guidance (to include technical orders and civil engineering manuals) that detail minimum maintenance requirements that compel unit adherence.

3.18.4. Preventative Maintenance. Actions taken to avoid premature failure of a system. It includes such actions as periodic inspection and cleaning, replacing filters, etc.

3.18.5. Periodic Maintenance. Maintenance performed on a regularly scheduled basis to maintain the condition, readiness, and safety of a system. Maintenance intervals may vary according to need (i.e., monthly, quarterly, yearly, etc.).

3.18.6. Corrective Maintenance. Actions required to restore spacelift systems to full mission capable status, or as close to original status as possible.

3.18.7. Hardware Levels of Maintenance.

3.18.7.2.1. Need for off-line test equipment to determine the acceptability of the component after repair (i.e., special test equipment not available at the organizational level).

3.18.7.2.2. Depot-level repair requiring special skills or techniques beyond organic capabilities, such as: overhauling, rebuilding, manufacturing, and modification of parts, as well as testing and reclamation of assemblies, sub-assemblies and end items.

3.18.7.2.3. Real Property (RP) or RPIE repair actions requiring special Civil Engineering (CE) skills or equipment (CE support level, organic maintainers or contractors).

3.18.8. Software Levels of Maintenance. Software maintenance complements existing spacelift services and maintenance contracts. Software maintenance occurs under a two-level maintenance concept outlined below.

3.18.8.1. Level One. This includes database parameters and system configuration changes (within design limits) performed IAW approved procedures. The unit may be responsible for performing level one software maintenance.

3.18.8.2. Level Two. Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) performs level two support maintenance that includes design code and test of all changes in mission software, support operational software, and database structure.

3.19. Out-Of-Family. An event, condition or parameter that is outside a statistical norm for like events, conditions or parameters. After analysis, an "out-of-family" condition can be declared an anomaly.

3.20. Out-Of-Specification. A parameter outside the specified requirement.

3.21. Out-Of-Procedure. An event or condition not covered in an approved procedure.

3.22. Prime Contractor. Contractor that has primary operation/maintenance responsibility of the system.

3.23. Real Property (RP). Primarily consisting of facilities and other non-equipment support system infrastructure.

3.24. Real Property Installed Equipment (RPIE). Government-owned or leased equipment, apparatus, and fixtures that are essential to the function of the real property and permanently attached to, integrated into, or on government-owned or leased property.

3.25. Space Systems. Systems used to control or exploit space.

3.26. Space Systems Assets Available (SSAA). A milestone for turnover of mission equipment from AFMC to AFSPC. This is the point at which management responsibilities shift from AFMC program management to AFSPC launch processing management.

3.27. Spacelift. The ability to project power by transporting people and materiel to and or through space. (AFM 1-1) This includes the deployment, sustainment, and augmentation of satellite constellation by delivering space systems to the required orbit.

3.28. Spacelift Operations. Actions conducted by USAF or contractor personnel at the launch base to command and control space launch systems (i.e. launch countdown, telemetry data flows, countdown simulations, integrated systems verifications, dress rehearsals, etc.).

3.29. Spacelift Systems. All system(s) required to project power by transporting people and materiel to and or through space. This includes launch vehicles and launch facilities.

3.30. Support Equipment. All equipment required to make or keep a spacelift system, subsystem, or item of support equipment operational in its intended environment.

3.31. Supportable. Supportability requirements call for efficient and timely delivery of spares for the duration of the system life cycle. For a system to be supportable, it must conform to USAF supportability, software, critical component aging surveillance, pedigree traceability, and viable failure analysis program standards.

3.32. Sustaining Engineering. Under Integrated Weapon System Management (IWSM), sustaining engineering is a function performed by the AFMC product division Systems Program Office or their designate. Sustaining engineering is all actions to sustain a system from cradle to grave (including modifications, life-extension programs, etc.).

3.33. System Support Manager (SSM). Responsible for depot support of the spacelift systems.

3.34. Technical Procedures. All in-line checkout documents(system processing/periodic maintenance procedures), special test instructions, and non-standard work, (troubleshooting/corrective maintenance/launch base modification) implementation documents.

4. Coverage. All maintenance actions and management efforts outlined in this instruction must support the requirements of spacelift systems. Units will maintain a philosophy that eliminates the practices of maintenance shortcuts, bypassing technical data, disregarding safety or circumventing security restrictions. These ground rules apply whether the unit is actually performing the maintenance or controlling contractor-performed maintenance.

5. Objectives/Goals.

5.1. Objectives. To optimize the launch processing and launch of USAF spacelift systems in terms of timely response to need, mission success, safety, security, and cost effectiveness.

5.2. Goals. Optimum use of spacelift systems to satisfy national needs in surveillance, communication, and navigation.

6. Responsibilities.

6.1. General Maintenance Responsibilities. Squadron maintenance personnel act with the authority of the squadron commander in ensuring spacelift system assets are reliable and ready for operation
through control of contractor maintenance in the following areas: booster, upper stage, payload, and facility processing.

6.1.1. All activities to direct the contractor will be consistent with the contract specific delegation of authority as provided by the ACO.

6.1.2. Ensure compliance with all technical procedures to include USAF technical data, approved contractor system processing procedures, higher headquarters directives, and instructions. Make every effort to attend pre-task briefings for CAT II and CAT III tasks. When manpower permits, CAT 1 pre-task briefings must be attended. See attachment A2.1. for categories.

6.1.3. Ensure adequate documentation of contractor investigation of discrepancies that occur during receipt, processing, launch, and recovery.

6.1.4. Ensure efficient use of Air Force resources and compliance with technical/engineering data, general maintenance practices, procedural, safety, security, and environmental requirements at the work site.

6.1.4.1. Safety. Ensure all personnel follow safety regulations and conduct operations in a safe manner. Direct personnel to cease immediately any unsafe action observed.

6.1.4.2. Environmental:

6.1.4.2.1. Ensure implementation of federal, state, local, USAF, and base environmental compliance policy and procedures.

6.1.4.2.2. Ensure integration of environmental compliance into unit training and quality assurance programs.

6.1.4.2.3. Ensure integration of environmental compliance into processing procedures in AFSPC launch base reviews.

6.1.4.2.4. Environmental issues shall be delegated to the lowest possible level of authority within the units and HQ AFSPC.

6.1.4.2.5. Ensure documentation of any action taken to resolve discrepancies and lessons learned.

6.2. Workload Management. Maintenance Supervision ensures adequate control and scheduling of contractor work to support operations schedules. Maintenance personnel scheduling shall reflect optimum use of personnel resources and provide adequate crew rest between duty shifts as outlined in Eastern and Western Range 127-1.

6.2.1. Maintenance Supervision ensures apportionment of Air Force maintenance resources that best meet scheduling needs and melds such resources and operations schedules into a daily maintenance plan/schedule. The schedule must reflect sound maintenance policies, to include effective use of Air Force resources.

6.2.2. Maintenance task coverage will be based on locally-developed standards, based on a three-tier system Category I, II, III. See attachment A2.1 as a flowchart example. The SLS Maintenance Supervision approves the system and task categories.

6.2.2.1. Category I. Requires AF presence or approval to proceed.

6.2.2.2. Category II. AF will be present, depending on availability.

6.2.2.3. Category III. AF presence is optional.

6.2.3. For maintenance crew rest requirements, reference Eastern and Western Range 127-1, chapter 6 for Work Time Requirements.

6.3. Maintenance Data Collection (MDC). MDC provides units and major command (MAJCOM) with a means to operationally control spacelift assets through insight into mission, hardware, support equipment, and infrastructure maintenance and processing status. It also provides the System Program Director (SPD) and depot with sustainment engineering data for product improvement and configuration management.

6.3.1. Core Automated Maintenance System (CAMS) is the USAF's standard product-oriented maintenance management system. The Air Force adapted CAMS (combined with REMIS--Reliability and Maintainability Information System) for use within spacelift systems.

6.3.2. CAMS/REMIS support the USAF equipment maintenance, reliability and maintainability improvement, and maintenance management programs.

6.3.3. CAMS provides base-level maintenance the capability to input data on a real-time basis, receive remote information on a real-time basis, and produce reports that contain either detailed or summarized data.

6.3.4. The objective of implementing CAMS into spacelift systems is to enhance front-end design and increase the readiness and sustainability of systems by improving the availability, accuracy, and flow of essential hardware, equipment, and infrastructure maintenance information.

6.3.5. Where contractually required, the launch services, satellite processing services, and launch base support contractors have the responsibility to operate CAMS to include input data on flight hardware, support equipment, RPIE, and RP. Units operate CAMS, unless the prime contractor is required by contract, to operate the system. The prime contractor will use contractor-supplied inputs on flight hardware, support equipment, RPIE, and RP, in accordance with the AFSPC CAMS Implementation Plan for Spacelift Systems.

6.3.6. Wing Data Base Manager/Analysis Responsibilities.

6.3.6.1. Perform host CAMS database manager duties.

6.3.6.2. Assist CAMS users in resolving CAMS related software and hardware problems, and difficulty reports (DIREPS).

6.3.6.3. Assist CAMS users in becoming familiar with the system's on-line/background products and data interpretation.

6.3.6.4. Assist CAMS users in ensuring data accuracy and integrity.

6.3.6.5. Review all Communications-Computer Systems Requirements Document (CSRD) concerning CAMS changes or enhancements.

6.3.6.6. Serve as focal point for CAMS access, passwords, and system performance (e. g., scheduled and unscheduled downtime).

6.3.6.7. Perform special studies and trend analysis on spacelift systems.

6.3.6.8. Produce monthly and quarterly analysis summaries that depict key maintenance indicators, as identified by the SLSs (e. g., high failure items, equipment status, and mean time between failures).

6.3.7. Unit Responsibilities.

6.3.7.1. When contractors operate CAMS, the units will perform random verification of the accuracy of contractor-entered data.

6.3.7.2. Establish a distribution list, to include the appropriate contractors, HQ AFSPC/ Intercontinental Ballistic Missile and Spacelift Maintenance Division(LGM), System Support Manager (SSM), HQ SMC Acquisition Logistics (AL), 14 Air Force Logistics (LG). Request Data Base Management to distribute maintenance summaries and analyses reports as required by distribution list.

6.3.7.3. Report any developing maintenance trends to the designated SSM.
6.3.7.4. Ensure accuracy of asset inventory and maintenance data through random verification.

6.3.7.5. Maintenance Discrepancy Reporting.

6.3.7.5.1. Refer to AFM 66-279 and the CAMS implementation guide for discrepancy priorities.

6.3.7.5.2. Scheduled and unscheduled actions will be entered into the CAMS database.

6.3.7.6. Conduct monthly discrepancy reconciliation meetings to maintain accuracy of maintenance and supply data. The reconciliation meetings will consist of representatives from Maintenance Operation Coordination Center, maintenance flights, appropriate contractors and other agencies.

6.3.7.7. Ensure unit personnel designated to operate CAMS are trained.

6.4. Security. Establish effective security programs in coordination with unit security manager, host base security police/contract security.

6.5. SLS Maintenance Supervision (MA) Responsibilities. MA manages the maintenance functions and resources of the SLS. MA responsibilities:

6.5.1. Manage the following flights: Booster, Upper Stage (if applicable), Spacecraft, and Facilities.

6.5.2. Establish maintenance task coverage priorities based on three tier system Category I, II, III referenced in 6.2.2 of this instruction.

6.5.3. Establish Maintenance priorities for actual work efforts.

6.5.4. Manage maintenance functions IAW this instruction, local directives, and allied publications.

6.5.5. Develop local procedures for modification management using AF Supplement to DoDI5000.2 and configuration management IAW AFSPCI21-104.

6.5.6. Establish functions to plan, schedule, direct, and control maintenance resources. Acts as the approval authority for maintenance plans and schedules.

6.5.7. Identify spacelift system maintenance requirements to be included in Operational Requirements Documents (ORDs). Submit to Squadron CC for up-channel through Operations Group, Logistics Group, Support Group and Space Wing (as required) to the MAJCOM. Include maintenance mission support requirements in appropriate plans, programs, host/associate, and contract agreements.

6.5.8. Ensure effective quality assurance and training programs.

6.5.9. Act as or appoint a liaison for all spacelift environmental issues.

6.5.10. Serve as advocate for maintenance and logistics normalization initiatives.

6.5.11. Serve as maintenance liaison to operations.

6.5.12. Ensure personnel who have maintenance control responsibilities meet the training requirements established for performance of these duties.

6.5.13. Ensure compliance with applicable resource management directives and instructions.

6.5.14. Serve as focal point for maintenance reports, correspondence, and policy.
6.5.15. Manage, with Air Logistics Center (ALC), Space and Missile Systems Center, or contractor, all depot-level assistance and support, as applicable.

6.5.16. Serve as senior maintenance advisor to the squadron commander for wartime/contingency taskings.

6.5.17. Provide assistance to Base Civil Engineer (BCE) or applicable contractor in forecasting alteration and construction affecting RP and RPIE. Units should coordinate all changes affecting RP and RPIE with BCE and applicable contractor.

6.5.18. Ensure effective use of CAMS.

6.5.19. Appoint a corrosion control manager and ensure development and implementation of a corrosion control prevention, detection, and treatment program IAW AFSPCI21-105, if applicable.

6.5.20. Establish frequencies for maintenance forecasts and schedules and coordinate with appropriate local agencies.

6.5.21. Establish, in conjunction with owning work centers and contractors, critical levels of equipment by designating such items to be monitored, as applicable.

6.5.22. Responsible for control of spacelift systems maintenance performed at the launch base.

6.5.23. Interface with base support agencies (i.e., communications/electronics and BCE) on their responsibilities for pad, facility, equipment, hardware, and infrastructure maintenance.

6.5.24. Ensure compliance with Office of Personnel Management and USAF directives pertaining to assignment, promotion, training, and testing of USAF personnel and civil service employees.

6.5.25. Ensure flight personnel have a working knowledge of contracts, Statements of Work (SOW), Joint Working Agreements (JWA), and Memoranda of Agreement (MOA).

6.5.26. Provide input and ensure active squadron participation in Product Improvement Working Groups (PIWG).

6.5.27. Ensure suspected product quality deficiencies are reported to HQ AFSPC/LGM.

6.5.28. Participate in Operations Review Board (ORB) investigation review meetings.

6.5.29. Provide Maintenance and Operations Coordination Center function and Supply Liaison.

6.5.29.1. Maintenance and Operations Coordination Center (MOCC) Function. In coordination with flights, provide actual day-to-day control of spacelift system maintenance processing, representing the

6.3.7.1. When contractors operate CAMS, the units will perform random verification of the accuracy of contractor-entered data.

6.3.7.2. Establish a distribution list, to include the appropriate contractors, HQ AFSPC/ Intercontinental Ballistic Missile and Spacelift Maintenance Division(LGM), System Support Manager (SSM), HQ SMC Acquisition Logistics (AL), 14 Air Force Logistics (LG). Request Data Base Management to distribute maintenance summaries and analyses reports as required by distribution list.

6.3.7.3. Report any developing maintenance trends to the designated SSM.

6.3.7.4. Ensure accuracy of asset inventory and maintenance data through random verification.

6.3.7.5. Maintenance Discrepancy Reporting.

6.3.7.5.1. Refer to AFM 66-279 and the CAMS implementation guide for discrepancy priorities.

6.3.7.5.2. Scheduled and unscheduled actions will be entered into the CAMS database.

6.3.7.6. Conduct monthly discrepancy reconciliation meetings to maintain accuracy of maintenance and supply data. The reconciliation meetings will consist of representatives from Maintenance Operation Coordination Center, maintenance flights, appropriate contractors and other agencies.

6.3.7.7. Ensure unit personnel designated to operate CAMS are trained.

6.4. Security. Establish effective security programs in coordination with unit security manager, host base security police/contract security.

6.5. SLS Maintenance Supervision (MA) Responsibilities. MA manages the maintenance functions and resources of the SLS. MA responsibilities:

6.5.1. Manage the following flights: Booster, Upper Stage (if applicable), Spacecraft, and Facilities.

6.5.2. Establish maintenance task coverage priorities based on three tier system Category I, II, III referenced in 6.2.2 of this instruction.

6.5.3. Establish Maintenance priorities for actual work efforts.

6.5.4. Manage maintenance functions IAW this instruction, local directives, and allied publications.

6.5.5. Develop local procedures for modification management using AF Supplement to DoDI5000.2 and configuration management IAW AFSPCI21-104.

6.5.6. Establish functions to plan, schedule, direct, and control maintenance resources. Acts as the approval authority for maintenance plans and schedules.

6.5.7. Identify spacelift system maintenance requirements to be included in Operational Requirements Documents (ORDs). Submit to Squadron CC for up-channel through Operations Group, Logistics Group, Support Group and Space Wing (as required) to the MAJCOM. Include maintenance mission support requirements in appropriate plans, programs, host/associate, and contract agreements.

6.5.8. Ensure effective quality assurance and training programs.

6.5.9. Act as or appoint a liaison for all spacelift environmental issues.

6.5.10. Serve as advocate for maintenance and logistics normalization initiatives.

6.5.11. Serve as maintenance liaison to operations.

6.5.12. Ensure personnel who have maintenance control responsibilities meet the training requirements established for performance of these duties.

6.5.13. Ensure compliance with applicable resource management directives and instructions.

6.5.14. Serve as focal point for maintenance reports, correspondence, and policy.
6.5.15. Manage, with Air Logistics Center (ALC), Space and Missile Systems Center, or contractor, all depot-level assistance and support, as applicable.

6.5.16. Serve as senior maintenance advisor to the squadron commander for wartime/contingency taskings.

6.5.17. Provide assistance to Base Civil Engineer (BCE) or applicable contractor in forecasting alteration and construction affecting RP and RPIE. Units should coordinate all changes affecting RP and RPIE with BCE and applicable contractor.

6.5.18. Ensure effective use of CAMS.

6.5.19. Appoint a corrosion control manager and ensure development and implementation of a corrosion control prevention, detection, and treatment program IAW AFSPCI21-105, if applicable.

6.5.20. Establish frequencies for maintenance forecasts and schedules and coordinate with appropriate local agencies.

6.5.21. Establish, in conjunction with owning work centers and contractors, critical levels of equipment by designating such items to be monitored, as applicable.

6.5.22. Responsible for control of spacelift systems maintenance performed at the launch base.

6.5.23. Interface with base support agencies (i.e., communications/electronics and BCE) on their responsibilities for pad, facility, equipment, hardware, and infrastructure maintenance.

6.5.24. Ensure compliance with Office of Personnel Management and USAF directives pertaining to assignment, promotion, training, and testing of USAF personnel and civil service employees.

6.5.25. Ensure flight personnel have a working knowledge of contracts, Statements of Work (SOW), Joint Working Agreements (JWA), and Memoranda of Agreement (MOA).

6.5.26. Provide input and ensure active squadron participation in Product Improvement Working Groups (PIWG).

6.5.27. Ensure suspected product quality deficiencies are reported to HQ AFSPC/LGM.

6.5.28. Participate in Operations Review Board (ORB) investigation review meetings.

6.5.29. Provide Maintenance and Operations Coordination Center function and Supply Liaison.

6.5.29.1. Maintenance and Operations Coordination Center (MOCC) Function. In coordination with flights, provide actual day-to-day control of spacelift system maintenance processing, representing the
critical elements of a Job Control function and Scheduling Control function in a traditional maintenance organization. The following are the responsibilities of MOCC function:

6.5.29.1.1. Plan ,schedule and coordinate the Air Force requirements for Maintenance, Operations and contractor schedules.

6.5.29.1.2. Coordinate maintenance discrepancies identified through scheduling and CAMS.

6.5.29.1.3. Assist MA in maintenance planning through review of resources required to meet schedules.

6.5.29.1.4. Implement daily maintenance plan, coordinate the accomplishment of those tasks that are not scheduled and resolve maintenance conflicts.

6.5.29.1.5. Serve as primary briefing/debriefing function for the MA and establish briefing/debriefing requirements.

6.5.29.1.6. Serve as the focal point for discrepancy reporting. Ensure maintenance data is updated in CAMS as required.

6.5.29.1.7. Publish procedures for tracking job control numbers (JCN) and equipment identification (ID) numbers used in CAMS.

6.5.29.1.8. Maintain current status of assigned boosters, upper stages, solid rocket motors, and spacecraft.

6.5.29.1.9. Maintain current status of critical facilities, hardware, and support equipment.

6.5.29.1.10. Respond in support of emergency and disaster situations IAW local procedures and host/associate agreements.

6.5.29.1.11. Assist Supply Liaison in initiating priority parts requests, as applicable.

6.5.29.1.12. Assist Supply Liaison in verification of parts orders, with respect to urgency of need designators (UND) and supply delivery priorities.

6.5.29.2. Supply Liaison responsibilities:

6.5.29.2.1. Request system parts and supplies from base supply, Contractor/Government Operated Civil Engineering Stores (COCESS/GOCESS), and Contractor/Government Operated Stores (COPARS/GOPARS).

6.5.29.2.2. Prepare budget inputs and submit to resource advisor. Monitor expenses for system parts and supplies.

6.5.29.2.3. Notify MA when funds shortages are projected or detected.

6.5.29.2.4. Ensure flights do not independently requisition or expense system parts and supplies.

6.5.29.2.5. Assist in establishing bench stocks and supply points in conjunction with applicable shops as required.

6.5.29.2.6. Process issue requests.

6.5.29.2.6.1. When applicable, ensure SRDs are entered on the issue request.

6.5.29.2.7. Resolve supply document information discrepancies loaded against work orders in CAMS.

6.5.29.2.8. Monitor back order requirements.

6.5.29.2.9. Request long lead-time items in sufficient quantities.

6.5.29.2.10. Ensure proper use of UND.

6.5.29.2.11. Manage stock levels.
6.5.29.2.12. Assist maintenance personnel and contractor(s) in identifying parts and preparing requisitions.

6.5.29.2.13. Ensure accuracy of CAMS database for all parts status.

6.5.29.2.14. Provide supply expertise to maintenance and contractor personnel.

6.5.29.2.15. Research replacement/substitute parts and supplies with assistance from the MOCC function.

6.5.29.2.16. Properly identify work order residue and serviceable expendable (XB3) items for storage or turn-in to Supply Liaison, as applicable.

6.5.29.2.17. Initiate or assist with contractor(s) parts requests.

6.5.29.2.18. Ensure proper disposition of condemned, excess, and repairable USAF property.

6.5.29.2.19. Process repair cycle assets through Base Supply IAW repair cycle procedures in AFM 23-110, as applicable.

6.5.29.2.20. Process other reclaimable property, including USAF XB3 parts and broken tools through the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO). Process items directly to the unit single collection point or directly to DRMO IAW AFM 23-110.

6.6. Flight Responsibilities. The following are the common responsibilities of the Booster, Spacecraft, Facilities, and Upper Stage Flights.

6.6.1. Review reports and analyses to identify deficient areas (especially concerning training and quality assurance) and take corrective action.

6.6.2. Perform /monitor organizational level maintenance (as applicable), to include preventative maintenance or corrective maintenance actions, ensuring system readiness for mission operations.

6.6.3. Review contractor maintenance in areas of spacelift systems processing and documentation.

6.6.4. Ensure efficient use of Air Force resources and compliance with technical/engineering data, general maintenance practices, procedural, safety, security, and environmental requirements at the work site.

6.6.5. Participate in final system inspection prior to launch.

6.6.6. Participate in the configuration control process IAW AFSPCI21-104.

6.7. Flight Supervision Responsibilities. Responsible to the MA for the management of assigned functional area. The Flight Superintendent will:

6.7.1. Ensure personnel have been briefed on all applicable changes to technical data, instructions, and contractor procedures.

6.7.2. Implement the Quality Assurance program as outlined in paragraph 7.

6.7.3. Review reports and analyses to identify deficient areas and take appropriate corrective actions.

6.7.4. Provide wartime/contingency planning team members to MA.

6.7.5. Provide current maintenance, mission, and readiness status to the MOCC function.

6.7.6. Participate in maintenance planning and forecasting activities.

6.7.7. Ensure Maintenance Controllers are qualified to perform assigned duties.

6.7.8. Notify the MOCC function of changes to personnel availability.

6.7.9. Assign system responsibility to individual Maintenance Controllers (as applicable).

6.7.10. Ensure contractor-performed tasks have appropriate Maintenance Controller coverage.

6.7.11. Assist contractor in initiating all applicable parts requests through Supply Liaison.

6.7.12. Ensure compliance with Maintenance Controller training requirements as outlined in this instruction.

6.7.13. Ensure Maintenance Controllers are aware that the MOCC function must be advised of job status.

6.7.14. Establish Air Force pre-task briefing procedures to include the following, as a minimum:

6.7.14.1. Ensure the necessary materials, coordination, and procedures are obtained to cover/perform the task.

6.7.14.2. Ensure Maintenance Controllers know simultaneous task actions and communications requirements and coordinate with supporting work centers and the MOCC function.

6.7.14.3. Review/identify task qualifications.

6.7.14.4. Ensure compliance with debriefing procedures.

6.7.14.5. Ensure personnel are knowledgeable of spacelift systems safety requirements, buddy care program, security requirements, emergency procedures and environmental requirements.

6.7.14.6. If replaced on duty, conduct changeover briefing as required.

6.8. Maintenance Controller (MC). Responsible for the control of processing on assigned spacelift systems. This responsibility includes directing an immediate halt to any actions detrimental to personnel or equipment. Responsibilities include:

6.8.1. Report suspected product quality deficiencies.

6.8.2. Comply with briefing/debriefing requirements as outlined by local requirements.

6.8.3. Coordinate actions, update status, delays, and problems with the Maintenance Operation Coordination Center function.

6.8.4. Responsible for safety, security and correction of deviations.

6.8.5. Identify and ensure correction of any procedure deviations that could affect mission assurance.

6.8.6. Identify and ensure resolution of interference with other maintenance.

6.8.7. Assure configuration control is maintained IAW AFSPCI21-104.

6.8.8. Review technical changes and approve/disapprove technical procedures at the launch base to include real-time changes, non-administrative changes and deviations to technical procedures. Also, review and approve/disapprove all troubleshooting and corrective maintenance actions, including adequate documentation of these actions.

6.8.9. Participate in recovery teams and problem/anomaly resolutions as required.

6.8.10. Review current technical procedures prior to controlling a task and have a personal copy available during control duties.

6.8.11. Ensure environmental compliance.

6.8.12. Comply with established emergency procedures.

6.8.13. Responsible for the technical adequacy and safety of assigned spacelift systems during Maintenance activities.

6.8.14. Provide subject matter expertise on assigned systems, processes, and technical advice to spacelift management.

6.8.15. Provide system specific technical expertise and liaison to Wing Safety on all matters that affect safety.

6.8.16. Review and provide signature close-out indicating acceptable results of as-run tasks in a post maintenance environment.

6.8.17. Review all pertinent data obtained during the performance of processing and launch.

6.8.18. Chair, participate and provide support for the following launch base activities, as required:

6.8.18.1. Sub-working Groups (SWGs) and Technical Interchange Meetings (TIMs) to resolve issues on spacelift systems.

6.8.18.2. Hardware/software turnover acceptance reviews.

6.8.18.3. Design reviews for new or modified flight and support equipment to ensure launch base processing needs are met.

6.8.19. Perform walk-downs as required.

6.8.20. Provide on-console support and/or support to on-console positions during major tasks and the launch countdown.

6.8.21. Coordinate with outside agencies as required.

6.8.22. Control of technical procedures performed on spacelift systems.

6.9. Technical Engineer (TE). An individual who has the understanding of their assigned systems - i.e., engineering analysis, functional requirements, integrated test plans, schematics and system interfaces, etc. Technical Engineers are responsible to support engineering analysis, system safety, and certain Maintenance Controller responsibilities of assigned spacelift systems. TE responsibilities include:

6.9.1. Chair, participate, support and coordinate problem and issue resolution efforts.

6.9.2. Provide subject matter expertise and engineering recommendations on assigned systems and processes to all levels of spacelift management.
6.9.3. Support control of selected technical operations performed on spacelift systems as required.

6.9.4. Act as liaison and provide system-specific technical engineering expertise to Wing Safety.

6.9.5. Review technical changes and approve/disapprove technical procedures, procedure changes and other pertinent documentation to ensure launch base requirements are satisfied and sound engineering practices are used. Coordinate with outside agencies as required.

6.9.6. Review and provide signature close-out for technical procedures to ensure results meet launch base requirements.

6.9.7. Review pertinent data obtained during the performance of Spacelift Systems Maintenance activities to ensure readiness of spacelift system.

6.9.8. Ensure proper configuration of spacelift systems through review of pertinent data and walk-downs. Ensure modifications are requested and performed IAW AFSPCI21-104.

6.9.9. Support operational concept definitions, design reviews and hardware/software acceptance reviews for new or modified spacelift systems to ensure launch base processing needs are met. Support sub-working Groups (SWGs) and Technical Interchange Meetings (TIMs) to resolve issues on spacelift systems.

6.9.10. Conduct launch base hardware turnover acceptance reviews.

6.9.11. Provide on-console support and/or support to on-console positions during major tasks and the launch countdown.

6.9.12. Provide technical engineering assistance to the procuring agency in correcting spacelift system deficiencies and improving the cost effectiveness of launch base operations.

6.9.13. Coordinate procedure performance and results with maintenance controllers.

6.9.14. Participate in post flight data review for initial assessment of operations results or mission outcome.

7. Quality Assurance (QA).

7.1. General. The quality assurance program is designed to verify the effectiveness of maintenance training and the proficiency of maintenance personnel performing control responsibilities. The goal of the program is not to create another level of control in the workplace, but rather encourage supervisor participation and interest in the technical and professional growth of maintenance personnel.

7.2. Operation Group Standardization and Evaluation office's Maintenance Quality Assurance Responsibilities. Monitor and provide a focal point for maintenance QA program.

7.2.1. Assist units in obtaining inspector training.

7.2.2. Assist units in managing an inspector training program and Maintenance Inspection Program (MIP) orientation course tailored to individual unit needs. Standardize training requirements for unit QA inspectors.

7.3. MA Quality Assurance Responsibilities. Develop and manage, with assistance from the Operation Group Standardization and Evaluation office's Quality Assurance representative, a QA and MIP using inspectors designated by the MA. Ensure these programs evaluate maintenance capability and effectiveness by inspecting personnel proficiency, maintenance controller procedures, and managerial guidance. Accomplish the following:
7.3.1. Develop a management system that reflects inspection requirements.

7.3.2. Determine inspection report content, format, distribution, trend analysis, and routing procedures.

7.3.3. Ensure certification of all inspectors.

7.3.4. Observe each inspector conducting Proficiency Inspections (PI) annually.

7.3.5. Ensure all personnel involved in the inspector selection process are task knowledgeable.

7.3.6. Ensure fulfillment of inspector guidelines.

7.4. Flight Supervision QA Responsibilities.

7.4.1. Ensure task knowledge of inspectors on the appropriate technical tasks in the Career Field Education and Training Plan (CFETP) they inspect.

7.4.2. Ensure inspectors produce inspection reports that identify positive efforts as well as underlying causes of substandard quality.

7.5. Inspector Guidelines. The goal of the MIP is to ensure quality maintenance/control. Inspectors help ensure quality maintenance by conducting and documenting Personnel Inspections (PIs). PIs include Personnel Proficiency Inspections (PPI) and Trainer Proficiency Inspections (TPI). Produce inspection reports that identify positive efforts as well as underlying causes of substandard quality. Inspectors will:

7.5.1. Document strengths and weaknesses.

7.5.2. Document all deviations seen with applicable references.

7.5.3. Develop an impact assessment for each deviation noted. Deviations are different, so assess that difference, but do not try to categorize it. The inspector knows best the significance of each observed deviation and must translate that significance so management has a clear perspective of actions observed. The intent is to inform management of all observations and identify those deviations that may require significant retraining rather than those that should be noted only for possible analysis.

7.5.4. If practical, use on-the-spot training to correct deviations.

7.5.5. Perform inspections on a non-interference basis (to contractor operations).

7.5.6. Inspectors may conduct PIs on anyone who performs maintenance controller duties on contractor maintenance and/or instructs a task/procedure.

7.5.7. Document and correct failure to intervene in instances where contractor operations create potential imminent equipment and resource damage.

7.5.8. Conduct PPIs on actual tasks/procedures.

7.5.9. Be task knowledgeable on the tasks/procedures inspected.

7.5.10. If possible, before conducting a PPI or a TPI, verify task certification in CFETP.

7.5.11. Manage inspection scheduling requirements.

7.5.11.1. Inspect each individual annually.

7.5.11.2. Ensure individuals receive PPIs starting in the first full quarter after initial task certification.

7.5.11.3. For each deviation, conduct training to the level necessary to ensure the individuals understanding of the circumstances in question. If the inspector is prohibited from conducting training for any reason, note the situation in the report and defer required training to flight supervision. The inspector may recommend that the individual not perform/monitor the task until retrained.

7.5.12. Briefing Guidelines. Brief the individuals before beginning a PI. As a minimum, include the following:

7.5.12.1. Tasks/procedures to be inspected.

7.5.12.2. Inspector may ask questions to determine inspectee's knowledge of the tasks. The individual may use any sources available to answer questions.

7.5.12.3. The individual may ask for technical assistance from personnel/agencies normally available.

7.5.12.4. The inspector's presence does not shift individual responsibility.

7.5.12.5. Critique the individual as soon as possible after the completion of the inspection.

7.5.12.6. Inform trainees they will not be inspected.

7.5.13. Critique Guidelines.

7.5.13.1. Explain each deviation and discuss the correct procedures.

7.5.13.2. Review the inspectee's strengths and weaknesses.

7.5.13.3. Recommend methods of task accomplishment.

7.5.13.4. Exchange ideas and techniques.

8. Maintenance Training:

8.1. General. Unit Training performs maintenance training management and control function. It schedules, monitors, and controls the various unit training programs in accordance with applicable training directives and guidelines.

8.2. OSS Maintenance Training Responsibilities.

8.2.1. Provide oversight for the maintenance training program.

8.2.2. Serve as the focal point for obtaining and scheduling of maintenance training quotas for courses conducted by outside agencies (on or off base).

8.2.3. Use AF Form 403, Request for Special Technical Training, and DD Form 1556, Request Authorization Agreement, Certification of Training, and Reimbursement, to request special training needs. Submit requests to HQ AFSPC/LGMM, 150 Vandenberg St., Ste. 1105, Peterson AFB CO, 80914-4470.

8.2.4. Assist Unit Training with the Training Evaluation Program IAW AFI36-2201.

8.3. Unit Training Responsibilities.

8.3.1. Schedule and monitor unit maintenance training.
8.3.2. Manage training programs.

8.3.3. Observe all instructors conducting training at least once a year. Do not exceed 12 months between observations.

8.3.4. Develop and distribute a schedule of future training classes in sufficient time for all agencies to determine requirements.

8.3.5. Serve as the squadron focal point for obtaining and scheduling of maintenance training quotas for courses conducted by outside agencies (on or off base).

8.3.6. Use AF Form 403 to request special training needs. Submit requests to HQ AFSPC/LGMM.

8.3.7. Provide each maintenance flight a copy of the training forecast and awaiting action listing.

8.3.8. Monitor overdue training and notify the appropriate level of supervision to correct training deficiencies.

8.3.9. Designate an Instructional System Development (ISD) specialist. The ISD specialist will:

8.3.9.1. Based on quota availability, attend a ISD course. Previous 3S2X1 technical training satisfies the attendance requirements for ISD course.

8.3.9.2. Assist in preparing lesson plans, ensure all lesson plans follow ISD guidance and assist in developing locally produced training programs.

8.3.10. Manage learning center resources and equipment.

8.3.11. Ensure training records are accurate and current.

8.3.12. Ensure proper administration of on-the-job training (OJT) and enlisted specialty training (EST) IAW AFI36-2201.

8.3.13. Assist supervisors with the Training Evaluation Program IAW AFI36-2201.

8.3.14. Ensure supervision conducts initial interview/evaluation of new arrivals within 30 days after their assignment.

8.3.15. Ensure all maintenance flights establish training plans.

8.3.16. Coordinate with all maintenance flights to monitor and schedule all non-technical training requirements.

8.3.17. Use AFI36-2201 to administer the ancillary training program. Ancillary training covers subjects required by USAF personnel that are separate from the individual's primary USAF specialty.

8.3.18. Manage and schedule general, special, and supplemental training. Provide non-technical information (i.e., safety, security, and management) pertinent to duty performance. See Attachment A1.1 for course requirements levied by this instruction.

8.3.19. Conduct the Upgrade Training Program IAW AFI36-2201. Monitor upgrade training in coordination with the trainee's flight supervision.

8.3.20. Use the ISD process to develop maintenance training programs.

8.3.21. Ensure use of lesson plans for all technical training.
8.3.22. Review lesson plans at least once a year, not to exceed 12 months between reviews.

8.3.23. Establish an initial and a Recurring Technical Training (RTT) program. Help work center supervisors develop an RTT program.

8.3.24. Manage initial and recurring technical training for all maintenance flights.

8.4. Flight Training Responsibilities.

8.4.1. Develop an RTT program.

8.4.1.1. Determine RTT requirements.

8.4.1.2. Tailor this program to individual Maintenance Controller and flight needs.

8.4.1.3. Schedule RTT through the Unit Training.

8.4.1.4. Notify Unit Training of RTT accomplishment.

8.4.2. Ensure adequacy of lesson plans.

8.4.3. Promptly identify and correct training deficiencies.

8.5. Officer Training. Unit Training will develop, manage, and document the officer training program for all officers assigned to MA, IAW the applicable CFETP and local training requirements.

8.6. Training Review Boards (TRB). TRBs are suggested, but optional. Determine content and format locally, if used.

8.7. Consolidated Task Coverage File. Establish a consolidated task coverage file to insure 100 percent task coverage within the unit. Ensure a training capability exists for each CFETP technical task performed.

8.8. Flight Trainer Qualifications. Prior to performing unsupervised instructor duties, personnel selected as instructors must:

8.8.1. Be a certified trainer.

8.8.2. Be observed by Unit Training /ISD specialist and the individual's supervisor.

8.9. CFETP Review. A CFETP review board, chaired by the Unit Training , will review CFETPs and local AF Forms 797, Job Qualification Standard Continuation, Command JQS, for proper coverage and currency.

8.9.1. Use local AF Forms 797 to document training on new tasks not in the CFETP.

8.9.2. Ensure the board consists of all affected work-centers.

8.9.3. The review board will:

8.9.3.1. Review CFETP changes and local AF Forms 797.

8.9.3.2. Assign task responsibility.

8.9.3.3. Identify seldom performed tasks.

8.9.3.4. Review and validate new documents within 30 days of receipt and make local additions as necessary.

8.10. Training Requirements. See Attachment A.1.1 for training requirements specified by this instruction. Unit Training ensures appropriate lesson plan development. Determine instruction locally.

9. Procedures:

9.1. Testing Procedural and Process Improvements. Use the following procedures for field testing new ideas:

9.1.1. Forward a copy of the test proposal, to include all necessary supporting information, to HQAFSPC/LGMM. Limit proposals to management, process, or procedural areas governed by this instruction. Include the following information:

9.1.1.1. New procedure or concept.

9.1.1.2. Anticipated management improvement.

9.1.1.3. Impact outside of this instruction.

9.1.1.4. Time required to fully test.

9.1.1.5. Unit point of contact and telephone number.

9.1.1.6. Specific test objectives.

9.1.2. If field testing is approved, HQ AFSPC will provide appropriate notification and implementing authority.

9.1.3. Units will coordinate any decision to stop, suspend, or resume testing with HQ AFSPC/LGMM.

9.1.4. Forward progress reports and field test results to HQ AFSPC/LGMM for final evaluation. Address each specific objective and assess attainment of that objective in quantifiable terms.

9.2. Changes, requests for clarification, and waivers:

9.2.1. Submit recommendations to waiver, change, or clarify this instruction or other management directives to HQ AFSPC/LGMM.

9.2.2. Originators of changes, requests for clarification, or waivers should ensure all units which could be affected are included as informational addressees.

9.3. Supplements to this instruction. Units supplement as needed. However, all supplements must be coordinated through 30/45 Operations Group Standardization and Evaluation office's Quality Assurance representative and HQ AFSPC/LGM. Distribute approved supplements to HQ AFSPC/LGM and 14AF Logistics Plans (LGX), 747 Nebraska Ave Ste 23, Vandenberg AFB CA 93437-6283.

10. Reports. Operations Group will:

10.1. Submit to HQ AFSPC/LGML updated maintenance schedules monthly.

10.2. When requested, submit to HQ AFSPC/LGML appropriate wing level indicator ratings in support of the Sustainment Executive Management Report (SEMR).

JERRY M. DRENNAN, Colonel, USAF
Director of Logistics

Attachments
1. Training Requirements
2. Maintenance Task Coverage Priorities

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

A1.1. Maintenance Management Training.

APPLIES TO: All 2M0XX, 13SX, 21MX, 62XX who perform/control maintenance tasks.
FREQUENCY: One time.
OPR: Unit Training
REMARKS: Ensure personnel understand AFPD21-1, AFI21-108, and HQ AFSPCIs
that apply to the maintenance organization.

A1.2. Unit Maintenance Officer Training.

APPLIES TO: All newly-assigned maintenance officers.
FREQUENCY: One time.
OPR: Unit Training
REMARKS: Train each newly assigned maintenance officer on CFETP Course Training
Standards. Technical task familiarization training must be conducted by
certified instructors and may be conducted in conjunction with other training.

A1.3. Corrosion Control Training.

APPLIES TO: All 2M0XX, 21MX, 62XX who perform/control maintenance tasks.
FREQUENCY: Annual.
OPR: Unit Training
REMARKS: Ensure an understanding of the requirements of the Corrosion Control Program.

MAINTENANCE TASK COVERAGE PRIORITIES

A2.1. Example Procedure Category Flow Chart