DEFENSE TECHNOLOGY AREA PLAN DTOs
SPACE PLATFORMS

SP.01.06 Cryogenic Technologies. This DTO will demonstrate advanced cryogenic cooling technologies for SWIR, MWIR, LWIR, and VLWIR space surveillance sensors requiring operating temperatures between 10 K and 150 K; and will develop Stirling, Brayton, and pulse tube cryocoolers that reduce launch weight, improve power efficiency, lessen vibrations, and lengthen on-orbit lifetimes while providing sufficient cooling to maintain focal planes at required temperatures.

Demonstrated technology goals for cryogenics include reducing specific mass from the current level of 15 kg/Wcooling to 8 kg/Wcooling by FY00 and 5 kg/Wcooling by FY05; reducing specific power (watts of input power per watt of cooling) from the current level of 70 W/Wcooling to 50 W/Wcooling by FY00 and 40 W/Wcooling by FY05; increasing life expectancy from the current 2-year level to 5 years in FY00 and to 7.5 years by FY05; and reducing induced vibrations from the current level of 1.0 Nrms to 0.1 Nrms by FY00 and 0.01 Nrms by FY05. Technology payoffs are increased payload mass fraction, extended on-orbit life, and improved sensor resolution due to a reduced vibration environment.

These technologies will be demonstrated through the development of protoflight engineering models and laboratory testing. Milestones include delivery of an Advanced 35 K/60 K Cryocooler in FY99 and demonstration of the No Moving Parts Advanced Cryocooler in FY01.

Technology barriers/challenges include: availability of lightweight components for use in cryogenic temperatures; excessive friction and material stresses in miniature-sized, high-frequency cycles; contamination of seals and orifices; lack of effective design and materials for cryogenic regenerators; poorly understood thermodynamic loss mechanisms; and ineffective vibration isolation control electronics and techniques.

Customers for cryogenic technologies include those who use sensors for space surveillance and missile warning and tracking missions, specifically the SBIRS program, NASA, and NPOESS environmental sensors. This technology also supports development of low-temperature superconducting electronics pervasive to all DoD space vehicles, as well as USSPACECOM, NASA, and other space programs.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LtCol David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
Lt Charlie Light
SMC/MTAS
(310) 363-0020
lightca@mt2.laafb.af.mil
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Mr. Larry Crawford
PL/VTP
(505) 846-5754
Fax (505) 846-0320
crawford@plk.af.mil

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0603401F682J0.60.61.11.61.97.67.8
Total0.60.61.11.61.97.67.8

SP.02.07 Thermal Management Technology. This DTO develops and demonstrates thermal management technologies to improve the performance and reliability while reducing the mass of space vehicle thermal management subsystems; and develops variable-conductance and loop heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, and composite material radiators to improve the capability of the thermal subsystem to eliminate excess heat from the space vehicle and provide the required thermal environment for optimal mission completion.

Demonstrated technology goals for space thermal management include increasing heat flux from the current level of 2.9 W/cm2 to 3.8 W/cm2 by FY00, and to 5.2 W/cm2 in FY05; increasing heat transport from the current level of 2.5 kW-m to 4.5 kW-m by FY00, and to 9.0 kW-m by FY05; decreasing thermal subsystem mass from the current 0.04 kg/W to 0.038 kg/W by FY00, and to 0.034 kg/W by FY05; decreasing electronic component temperatures from the current level of 125°C to 120°C by FY00, and to 115°C by FY05; and decreasing space vehicle heater power from the current level of 0.11 W/W to 0.088 W/W by FY00, and further to 0.072 W/W by FY05. Technology payoffs are increased payload fraction and extended on-orbit lifetimes.

The program includes extensive ground testing. For two-phase fluid systems, final demonstration is accomplished on dedicated space missions, due to the inability to simulate the zero-g environment on Earth and possible significant effects on performance due to the gravity field. Milestones include delivery of one micron CPL wicks for characterization in FY99, delivery of a carbon-carbon radiator for flight test on New Millennium in FY97, and delivery of the Advanced Lightweight Thermal Bus protoflight model in FY02.

Technology barriers for space thermal management include rapid, reliable startup and long-term operation of capillary-pumped loop systems and loop heat pipes; and development of (1) low-cost, advanced composite materials and devices capable of dissipating high heat fluxes from microelectronics devices, (2) sub-micron wicks (1-micron pore size) for capillary-pumped loop applications, and (3) flexible or rotatable joints that allow for the efficient transportation of heat from the space vehicle bus outboard to a deployable radiator.

Thermal management is considered a pervasive technology area, applicable to all space vehicle program offices. The technologies are essential for those missions with either high-power dissipation (SMC or SAF/SP space-based radar) or concentrated power dissipation on reduced area payloads (next-generation military and commercial communication space vehicles such as MILSTAR III, as well as the NPOESS program with a multitude of weather sensors).

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
Lt Charlie Light
SMC/MTAS
(310) 363-0020
Fax (310)363-6882
lightca@mt2.laafb.af.mil
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Mr. Marko Stoyanof
PL/VTP
(505) 846-0775
stoyanof@plk.af.mil
Ms. Janice Smith
SMC/MCX
(310) 336-4844

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F88092.62.62.62.82.900
0603401F682J0.80.70.60.60.700
Total3.53.23.23.43.600

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.03.06 Space Structures and Control. This project will develop advanced space structural component technology to reduce the weight and cost of spacecraft and launch vehicle structures while improving their producibility and reliability; and will develop enabling structural sensing, control and vibration damping technologies for space platforms, precision surveillance sensors, space-based radars, space-based interceptors, missiles, and launch systems. This includes the development of a new class of adaptive or smart structures, which contain sensors and actuators to sense and suppress vibrations to meet mission requirements; the development of new mechanism concepts, such as nonpyrotechnic release devices; and new structural response sensors, such as advanced, multiplexable fiber optics sensors based on Bragg technology. In addition, there is exploratory research into the development of new structural control algorithms and into new approaches for determining the structural response characteristics of a space system on orbit. Structural control and vibration damping technologies are pervasive and support a wide range of commercial and military customers including all DoD spacecraft program offices as well as USSPACECOM, NAVSPAWARS, NASA, and other agencies.

Specific demonstrated capabilities and milestones for advanced structural control technology concepts, techniques, and production approaches are to reduce satellite structural mass by 35% and reduce cost by more than 10% by FY01 (70% and 25%, respectively, by FY11); to reduce ELV launch vehicle structural subsystem mass by 40% and cost by 40% by FY01 (75% and 75%, respectively, by FY11); decrease satellite dynamic launch loads by a factor of 5 by FY01 (a factor of 10 by FY11); demonstrate flight-qualified, fiber-optic sensors by FY00; and decrease on-orbit disturbances experienced by payloads by a factor of 10 by FY01 (a factor of 50 by FY11).

Technical challenges include developing rapid and less costly manufacturing techniques for large launch vehicle structures; accounting for the synergistic effects of the combined aspects of the space environment; developing high-fidelity simulations; reducing EMI effects and increasing the reliability/durability of multifunctional structures; ensuring satellite structural isolation without constraints on rattle space (clearance), weight, power, and volume, as well as interaction between the isolator control system and the launch vehicle control system; developing rapid nonpyrotechnic release mechanisms; and integrating neural network technology into structural control systems during operation. The technical approaches are focused on researching new structural concepts and construction methods to decrease the weight and cost. This technology improves the conductivity and radiation shielding capability of satellite bus and secondary structures. The project encompasses investigating new techniques to better understand and predict the effects of the space environment on spacecraft structures; and integrating power, communication, and electrical paths into the structure thus eliminating the need for wiring harnesses, connectors, and electronic boxes.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
LtCol William W. Selah
SMC/XR
(310) 363-0840
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Mr. Kevin Slimak
PL/VTS
(505) 846-8251
Maj Jon Wicklund
AFSPC
(719) 554-5824
Ms. Janice Smith
SMC/MCX
336-4844

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F88093.23.13.13.43.53.63.8
0603302F00030.6 0.60.60.60.70.70.7
0602234N


0.40.50.50.50.600
0603401F10260.6 0.91.31.62.02.12.2
Total4.85.15.66.26.86.46.6

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.05.06 Large Precise Structures. This DTO develops lightweight optical structures and associated sensor technologies for space deployment. Applications include surveillance from space, directed-energy weapons, and communications. Currently, the main thrust is to develop and demonstrate emerging technologies required for affordable large-aperture, space-based telescopes. The customers are AFSPC/DR, 21st Space Wing USSPC, and other agencies. Specific demonstrated capabilities and milestones are, by FY98, demonstration of key optics, structures, structural control, and signal processing technologies, and their integration in the New World Vistas-initiated Compensated, Large Lightweight Space Optics Program; a laboratory evaluation of integrated system performance will begin in FY98. This program will demonstrate the performance of a revolutionary approach to a large-aperture, high-resolution, space-deployable imaging system which will reduce optics payload weight by at least 50%, and launch cost proportionally. It will demonstrate space sensor technologies required for very large aperture, long-dwell systems used for global awareness.

Key technology challenges and developments include extremely lightweight large apertures such as dilute and inflatable optics, space-erectable structures, nonconventional wavefront compensation for maintaining good image quality, and smart sensor technologies for on-board processing. Specifically, dilute aperture phasing, nonlinear optical techniques, biomemonics for on board processing, and phase diversity will be evaluated. The integrated performance of deployable space structures, ultra lightweight optics, and nonconventional compensation systems will be evaluated using image quality, information delivery, and packaging efficiency as metrics.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
MGen Frank Campbell
HQ ACC/DR
(804) 764-4456
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Dr. Janet Fender
PL/LI
(505) 846-4014
LtCol William W. Selah
SMC/XR
(310) 363-0840
Dr. Richard Carreras
PL/LIMS
853-3258

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F33262.33.13.13.13.200
Total2.33.13.13.13.200

SP.08.06 Space Power System Technologies. This project will develop, demonstrate, and transition space power generation, storage, and management technologies to significantly enhance the capabilities and on-orbit life of space vehicles and missions. It incorporate solar photovoltaic array designs, solar thermal conversion subsystems, high specific energy batteries (NaS, Li ion), flywheels, high-voltage converter and solid-state switch components, and advanced wide-bandgap semiconductors to provide high-efficiency energy conversion and increased usable power to on-orbit space vehicles.

Demonstrated technology goals for an integrated space power system include increased subsystem conversion efficiency from current level of 18.5% to a level of 28% by FY00 and to 35% by FY05; increased solar array specific power from the current level of 50 W/kg to 100 W/kg in FY00, and further to 120 W/kg in FY05 (LEO); and increased LEO satellite energy-storage-specific energy density from the current 40 Wh/kg to 100 Wh/kg by FY00, and 150 Wh/kg in FY05. Technology payoffs are increased payload mass fraction, increased available usable power, and increased space vehicle on-orbit life using weight savings which may be applied to the station-keeping propulsion system.

Milestones for space power system technologies include: in FY00, development of a solar thermal power generation system, demonstration of high efficiency solar cell manufacturing techniques, and protoflight testing of nonelectrochemical energy storage devices; and in FY02, development of concepts for the Advanced Concentrator Follow-on Program. Space flight demonstrations are planned on the STRV-2 Program STP-5 and MightySat I in FY97.

Technical barriers include growth and compatibility of advanced semiconductor materials (GaInP2, GaAs, ZnGeAs2, CuInSe2) for multijunction and low-cost, ultra-thin solar cells; feasibility of high-efficiency solar thermal conversion through a combination of devices, concentrators, and power distribution systems; inability to predict the effects of battery cell design and electrochemical processes on optimum operating conditions, battery performance, and cycling lifetime; availability of high-voltage (70-130 Vdc), space-qualified, silicon-based, solid-state components and circuits; and availability of higher efficiency wide-bandgap (GaAs and SiC), solid-state devices.

Space power generation is a pervasive technology area, applicable to all space vehicle program offices. The technologies are essential for those missions with either high-power level or concentrated power usage payloads (next-generation military and commercial communication space vehicles such as MILSTAR III, as well as the NPOESS program.)

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
dixdm@acq.osd.mil
MGen Frank Campbell
SAF/SP
(703) 267-4949
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Dr. Kitt Reinhardt
Mr. Ralph James
AFPL/VTV
(505) 846-2637
Fax (505) 846-2885
Mr. Ben Lamb
SAF/SP
(703) 267-4949

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F88093.43.54.94.43.400
0603401F682J3.12.83.24.05.300
0603173C12703.00.100000
0602715HAX8.08.18.10000
Total17.514.416.38.38.600

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.09.01 Satellite Control. This DTO develops and integrates satellite control technologies for the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN) to provide autonomous ground and space operations, portable ground operations and data dissemination, and advanced operator environments for satellite control. This effort emphasizes the development of systems with increased operational capability and low acquisition and maintenance costs. Enhanced capability is achieved by providing immediate information to the warfighter through portable systems and providing a continuous upgrade process with flexibility so changing requirements can be easily satisfied.

These technologies provide for a reduction in instructor manpower requirements of 50% by FY00, a further reduction of 75% by FY05, a reduction in control costs (with an increase in capability) by 30% in FY00, and 40% by FY05 and 60% in FY10. Decision support for anomalies will be added in phases through FY99; on-board autonomous satellite health and status capability will be flight tested in FY02, machine learning systems in FY04, and immersive operator environments in FY05.

Technology challenges include the verification of the correctness and safety of automated anomaly detection and resolution based on artificial intelligence techniques such a neural networks; the development of reliable, verifiable, self-learning computer systems; reducing the processing and storage requirements of autonomous systems so they can be used on-board the satellite; developing generic intelligent systems that can be used on more than one satellite family; verifying correct performance of highly intelligent ground and space systems; and developing technologies that will satisfy acquisition and O&M cost constraints. Users include USAF Space Command, USAF Space and Missile Systems Center SPOs, and select Navy, BMDO, and other agencies.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
Maj Doug Westphal
50th SW/XPSV
(719) 550-2617
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
LtCol Nancy Crowley
PL/VTQ
(505) 846-0461

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F88092.43.03.13.33.43.63.7
0603401F28182.6 2.93.23.43.63.73.9
Total5.05.96.26.67.07.37.6

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.10.06 Boost Propulsion (ET). This program will demonstrate advanced spacelift propulsion capabilities for military and nonmilitary space launch systems to enhance low-cost, high-performance, responsive access to space for expendable or military multiuse vehicles via improved designs, combustion technologies, and material advancements; and develop and demonstrate solid, liquid, and hybrid propulsion systems for military, civil, and commercial applications. Future space launch systems will require full-flow staged combustion, increased chamber pressures, reduced part count, and advanced materials (including functionally graded material technologies and oxidation-resistant materials) in order to maintain the U.S. global presence capability through enhanced strategic agility. Specific demonstrated capabilities for liquid cryogenic propulsion systems include payload increases of 68% with cost reductions (in dollars per pound to orbit) of over 50% by FY00. By FY05, cryogenic propulsion system demonstrations will attain 121% payload increases with cost reductions of 78%, and hydrocarbon demonstrations will attain payload increases of 50% with 28% cost reductions. FY00 liquid spacelift propulsion demonstrations will achieve specific improvements of -25% failure rate, +5 sec Isp, -15% hardware costs, -15% support costs, +30% thrust/wt, and 20-mission life (mean time between removal for reusable systems). Specific demonstrated capabilities for solid and hybrid propulsion systems include payload increases of 7% with cost reductions of 12% by FY00. By FY05, solid demonstrations will achieve payload increases of 13% with 20% cost reductions. FY00 solid/hybrid boost propulsion demonstrations will achieve specific improvements of -25% failure rate, +15% mass fraction, +5 sec Isp, -15% hardware costs, and -15% support costs. Milestones for liquid boost propulsion include: by FY97, completion of the hydrostatic bearing tests for integration of the bearings into the Integrated Powerhead Demonstration in FY98 (increasing engine thrust/weight by 10%), with the engine demonstrations to begin in FY99. By FY97, thrust cell rapid prototyping techniques will be demonstrated (for significant design cost reductions). Milestones for solid boost developments include: by FY97, scale-up demonstration of high-temperature solid components (capable of withstanding higher combustion temperatures from new propellants) in a SuperBATES size motor, and high-performance environmental propellant ingredient scale-up and demonstrations (through FY98).

Technical challenges for liquid systems include improving material compatibility, reducing component weight and volume through the incorporation of advanced materials, increasing rotodynamic speeds (to decrease turbo pump assembly size), increasing turbine blade/disk capability of withstanding thermal shocks and high stresses at high temperatures, reducing composite processing costs, utilizing advanced bearing concepts, and identifying advanced bearing concept limitations. Solid system technical challenges include adapting polymeric materials for use in manufacturing reduced weight components, eliminating bondlines, and identifying high-strength case materials for decreased component mass/volume.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
LtCol William W. Selah
SMC/XR
(310) 363-0840
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Capt Marsha Wierschke
OLAC PL/RKBP
(805) 275-5345
Maj Marty France
HQ AFSPC/XR
(719) 554-5233
Ms. Janice Smith
SMC/MCX
(310) 336-4844

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F101124.418.124.324.524.024.327.1
0603302F437314.011.811.812.811.410.211.1
Total38.329.936.137.335.334.538.2

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.11.06 Orbit Transfer Propulsion AT. This DTO will demonstrate individual orbit transfer propulsion capabilities that significantly enhance low-cost, high-performance access to space via revolutionary propulsion techniques with improved designs, combustion and mixing technologies, and material advancements; and will develop and demonstrate chemical, high-power solar electric, and solar thermal propulsion systems for military, civil, and commercial orbit transfer applications. Future orbit transfer systems will require advanced materials, low-cost power processing developments, and increased thruster efficiency in order to maintain the U.S. global presence capability through enhanced strategic agility.

Specific demonstrated capabilities for chemical orbit transfer systems include an increased payload capability of 10% in FY00 and 20% in FY05. Solar thermal orbit transfer systems will demonstrate, by FY00, life and repositioning capabilities leading to $60 million in launch and lifespan cost savings. FY00 chemical/solar thermal orbit transfer propulsion demonstrations will achieve specific improvements of +10% Isp, and +15% mass fraction. Specific demonstrated capabilities for solar electric orbit transfer propulsion systems include increased repositioning capabilities doubling that of current systems, or life and payload increases leading to a $60 million launch cost savings. FY00 solar electric orbit transfer propulsion demonstrations will achieve specific improvements of +15% mass fraction and +15% thruster efficiency in FY00.

Milestones for orbit transfer propulsion include chemical thrust chamber assembly proof testing and hardware completion in FY97 for integration into the FY00 chemical upper-stage/orbit-transfer demonstration, Argos spacecraft launch for the ESEX high-power (30 kW) arcjet demonstration in FY97, and solar thermal propulsion system design complete in FY99 for balloon flight test in FY00.

Technical challenges/barriers include chemical combustion and mixing improvements for increased combustion efficiency, lightweight material developments to improve mass fraction in chemical systems, solar thermal concentrator (and absorber) design and deployment improvements to enhance reliability, refined solar thermal tracking capabilities, and increased solar electric power processing and thruster efficiency to reduce weight, increase performance, and increase reliability.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC
LTC David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
LtCol William W. Selah
SMC/XR
(310) 363-0840
Ms. Janice Smith
SMC/MCX
(310) 336-4844
Capt Marsha Wierschke
OLAC PL/RKBP
(805) 275-5345
DUSD (Space) POC Maj Jon Wicklund
AFSPC
(719) 554-5824
Maj Marty France
HQ AFSPC/XR
(719) 554-5233
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F10115.8 2.52.13.45.65.94.2
0603302F43730.82.34.03.65.07.27.0
Total6.64.86.17.110.613.111.2

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.13.06 Tactical Rocket Propulsion AT. This DTO demonstrates advanced tactical rocket propulsion capabilities for military systems to significantly enhance joint service lethality through long-range, highly maneuverable tactical rockets via improved designs, combustion technologies, and material advancements; and develops and demonstrates solid, gel, and hybrid propulsion systems for military (air-to-air, surface-to-air, etc.) applications. Future tactical rockets will exploit advanced materials including functionally graded material technologies to maintain the U.S. global presence capability through enhanced strategic agility and lethality.

Specific demonstrated capabilities for all tactical rocket propulsion systems include a 10% increase in warhead size or range, or a 20% decrease in time-to-target, by FY00. Divert propulsion systems will demonstrate a 26% reduction in the number of interceptors required (per theater) by FY00. FY00 tactical rocket propulsion demonstrations will achieve specific improvements of +3% delivered energy, +10% mass fraction (with TVC), and +2% mass fraction (without TVC), while maintaining current cost/safety/survivability standards.

Milestones for tactical rocket propulsion include formulating and testing a GAP/AN/CL20 propellant by FY97, evaluating a low-cost carbon-carbon nozzle by FY97, and integrating the nozzle and propellant for testing in FY97. Once successful, these components will be scaled up for integration into the IHPRPT program's FY00 high-performance, increased-range tactical propulsion demonstration.

Technical barriers revolve around two primary areas: propellant developments and component developments. Propellant technical challenges/barriers include reducing detonability while increasing performance in high-energy propellants, enhancing burn-rate control, and investigating high-energy smokeless ingredients. Component technical challenges/barriers involve adapting polymeric materials for use as reduced weight components, eliminating bondlines, and identifying high-strength case materials for decreased component mass/volume. Hybrid concepts are advantageous with respect to throttling and combustion control issues but are currently limited by their bulky, lower performing designs. Advanced materials will allow for new hybrid designs to be investigated. High-energy-fuel/-oxidizer developments are also required for hybrid tactical missiles to be exploited.

MICOMNAWC POC Service/Agency POC
(Space) POC
USD(A&T) POC Customer POC
Mr. J. Michael Lyon
AMSMT-RD-PR
(205) 876-8119
Fax (205) 876-4356
Maj Jon Wicklund
AFSPC
(719) 554-5824
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
MGen Frank Campbell
HQ ACC/DR
(804) 764-4456
Mr. Frank Markarian
NAWCWPNS
(619) 939-3241
Fax (619) 939-3036
LtCol David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
DUSD (Space) POC LtCol William W. Selah
SMC/XR
(310)363-0840
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Capt Marsha Wierschke
OLAC PL/RKBP
(805) 275-5345

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F10113.72.93.13.13.02.72.6
0603302F43730.30.30.30.30.30.30.4
0602303AA2142.92.83.23.2000


3.03.53.42.9000
0603792NR188911.29.05.00000
Total21.218.415.09.53.33.13.0

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.15.06 Protection Technologies. The goal is to develop and demonstrate technologies required to assure operation of U.S. space assets in both the natural space environment and the hostile warfighting environment. Specifically, the program will evaluate through high-fidelity subsystem and system models the effects of the threats on U.S./allied space systems, and then develop and demonstrate the efficacy of multithreat protection techniques against those threats.

The technical approach includes definition of the threat (hostile and natural—including space debris); developing program protection requirements with users; performance of susceptibility and vulnerability experiments at various levels of integration; development of models or analytic techniques for extrapolating data to higher levels of system interaction; performance of survivability enhancement options trades; development of protection techniques based on those performance trades; and demonstration of those techniques on appropriate subsystems.

Specific milestones for protection technologies include a reduced radiation safety factor for current COTS components from a factor of 10 to a factor of 5 by FY00, a factor of 4 by FY05, and a factor of 3 by FY10; laser threat protection increased by a factor of 2 by FY00, a factor of 5 by FY05, and a factor of 10 by FY10; RF high-power microwave susceptibility from a current level of 40 dB to 15 dB in FY00, 10 dB in FY05, and 6 dB by FY10; increased knowledge of space debris from the current shuttle baseline by a factor of 5 by FY00, a factor of 10 by FY05, and a factor of 25 by FY10. Demonstration of the laser microbolometer and RF detector will occur in FY01.

Technical barriers include accuracy of the threat/subsystem interaction modules; accuracy of space debris prediction models; integration of threat-specific modules into multithreat prediction models; minimization of performance impact of threat countermeasures; and integration of balanced multithreat protection capability.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LtCol David Lewis
SAF/AQRT
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
Ms. Janice Smith
SMC/MCX
(310) 336-4844
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Dr. Charles Aeby
PL/WSAS
(505) 846-4049
Maj Lindley Johnson
AFSPC/XPX
(719) 544-3836

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F57971.41.51.41.51.51.51.4
0603401F44002.3000000
0603605F31521.01.51.61.61.61.71.8
0603112F21001.10.50.10000
0603771F30951.50.300000
0602102F4347/80.50.20.20.20.20.20.2
0603410F2822/30 0.31.01.72.42.93.0
0602601F101000.10.60.60.600
Total7.74.44.95.66.46.46.5

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.16.06 Threat Warning and Attack Reporting. This DTO develops on-board sensor technologies to monitor, detect, identify, locate, characterize, and report a threat against critical U.S./allied satellites; and demonstrates innovative, lightweight, low-power, miniaturized, and cost-effective electro-optical, RF sensors, advanced microelectronics, and communication technologies.

The technical approach includes definition of the warfighter requirements by working with USSPACECOM; characterization of the threat environment as a function of time; investigation of candidate sensor and microelectronics technologies; and development and demonstration of candidate technologies which can be transitioned to SPOs.

Given the current technology baseline (135 lb and 110 W), specific demonstrated capabilities for a threat warning and attack reporting on-board system include a brassboard of a microbolometer laser detector in FY99 and a space demonstration in FY01 with weight reduction by a factor of 4 and power reduction by a factor of 3 in the RF sensor with associated electronics. This system will geolocate a threat. Follow-on activities to achieve an integrated laser/RF sensor suite with a weight and power reduction of a factor of 10 and a factor of 5, respectively, will commence in FY04.

Technical barriers include the use of a single laser detector (microbolometer) to achieve required bandwidth and dynamic range for pulsed and counter weapon sources; use of a cross-correlation receiver for RF threat detection; and miniaturization of the antennas and associated electronics to meet stringent weight and power goals.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
LtCol David Lewis
SAF/AQRT
(703) 602-9200
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
Maj Lindley Johnson
AFSPC/XPX
(719) 544-3836
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
Dr. Charles Aeby
PL/WSAS
(505) 846-4049
Maj Martin Gradilone
SMC/XRT
(310) 363-0810
Ms. Janice Smith
SMC/MCX
(310) 336-4844

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0603401F44001.80.500000
0603410F28230.30.30.20.10.100
Total2.00.80.20.10.100

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

SP.19.06 Technology for the Sustainment of Strategic Systems. USSTRATCOM developed a list of critical science and technology issues to sustain the national strategic system capability. The USSTRATCOM critical issue areas addressed in this DTO are boost propulsion, post-boost vehicle (PBV) propulsion, and missile system aging and surveillance.

The objectives of these efforts are to develop a class 1.3 solid propellant that meets all ballistic missile propulsion requirements—as well as the associated propulsion system components that are compatible with that propellant—by FY01; extend the "look ahead" window 10 years by FY00 and 20 years by FY10 with a 90% confidence level; reduce the time and cost for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) data processing by 50% by FY05; and develop and demonstrate PBV control system component technologies using commercially available materials by FY04.

The technologies being developed address critical component/ingredient availability; sustaining critical design, test, and manufacturing capabilities; and increasing system life, availability, and affordability. The technical challenges include developing non-shock-sensitive, high-energy propellant ingredients that will yield the required Trident ballistic performance while meeting the strategic missile service life requirements; identifying commercially available, high-temperature/high-strength materials that meet the Trident PBV operational requirements and can be manufactured using commercially available techniques; identifying effective seal materials for the Minuteman PBV propulsion system; and developing a better understanding of propulsion system chemical kinetics that can be linked with NDE techniques and service life prediction codes to increase missile propulsion service life prediction confidence by 100%.

Service/Agency POC USD(A&T) POC Customer POC DUSD (Space) POC
Dr. Tom Taylor
ONR
(703) 696-4225
Dr. Donald Dix
ODDR&E/AT
(703) 695-0005
Mr. Phil Spector
SSP 2020
(703) 607-3444
Mr. Albert DiMarcantonio
ADUSD (SI)
(703) 325-3281
LtCol David Lewis
SAF/AQR
(703) 602-9200
Col Dayton Silver
S&TS/MW
(703) 695-7328
Mr. Lee Meyer
PL/RK
(805) 275-5620
CAPT David Hearding
USSTRATCOM
(703) 695-3192

Programmed DTO Funding ($ millions)
PEProjectFY97FY98FY99FY00FY01FY02FY03
0602601F101106.07.07.07.07.05.4
0602111N


001.01.01.000
0603302F43733.03.03.03.03.03.03.0
0603302F63401.01.01.01.01.01.01.0
Total4.010.012.012.012.011.09.4