BY ORDER OF THE 4 FEBRUARY 1994
SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE AIR FORCE POLICY DIRECTIVE 10-13

Operations

AEROSPACE DOCTRINE

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1.1. Air Force doctrine is a statement of officially sanctioned beliefs and warfighting principles which describe and guide the proper use of aerospace forces in military action. It is authoritative but requires judgment in application. This directive provides guidance for the development and coordination of Air Force and joint or combined doctrine.

1.2. The Air Force will develop, promulgate, and teach this doctrine as a common frame of reference for the best way to employ aerospace forces. Most importantly, doctrine provides the foundation for Air Force policies which guide our personnel as they plan, employ, organize, train, equip, and sustain Air Force forces.

1.2.1. US Air Force doctrine will describe aerospace missions, tasks, and operating environments, guide commanders on employment of aerospace power, guide weapon development programs and force planning, guide organizational and personnel policies, provide the foundation for training and professional development of Air Force personnel, and provide the foundation for Air Force contributions to joint and combined doctrine development. Development will follow the processes described in AFI 10-1301, Aerospace Doctrine.

1.3. The following responsibilities and authorities are established:

1.3.1. The Air Force Director of Plans (HQ USAF/XOX) is the Lead Agent for basic and operational Air Force doctrine. HQ USAF/XOX performs these duties for joint and combined doctrine when Air Force is designated Lead Agent. HQ USAF/XOX designates the Primary Review Authority (PRA) (normally the Air Force Doctrine Center) for Air Force basic and operational level doctrine and joint and combined doctrine programs for which Air Force has been designated Lead Agent. When required, HQ USAF/XOX may designate a major command (MAJCOM), field operating agency (FOA), or Air Staff directorate as PRA for Air Force operational level, joint, or combined doctrine projects.

1.3.2. The Air Force Doctrine Center (AFDC) will act as the Air Force single point of contact for the development of all Air Force, joint, and combined doctrine, at both the basic and operational levels. It will conduct the Air Force doctrine development program. AFDC will gather, share, and distribute information by direct communication with those Air Force organizations that have pertinent capabilities and expertise, as needed, to perform its duties. AFDC is an FOA reporting directly to the Air Force Director of Plans, Deputy Chief of Staff/Plans and Operations. AFDC will serve as the Coordinating Review Authority (CRA) for joint doctrine and tactics, techniques, and procedures for which the Air Force is not designated Lead Agent. AFDC will coordinate directly with the Joint Doctrine Center, TRADOC, Naval Doctrine Command, and Marine Corps Combat Development Command on matters related to joint doctrine development. The Air Force Director of Plans will communicate with these agencies at the General Officer level.

1.3.3. The Air Staff Doctrine Division (HQ USAF/XOXD) works policy and advocacy issues for doctrine matters. This division will act as the Air Staff point of contact for doctrine matters and conduct formal joint doctrine coordination in accordance with CJCS Memorandum of Policy 9. It also conducts Air Staff doctrine coordination and completes Air Staff coordination and final approval of Air Force doctrine publications. In addition, it manages the publication and distribution of Air Force doctrine by establishing and maintaining distribution lists and coordinating with SAF/AAIP for publishing, Publications Bulletin notification, and distribution.

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Supersedes AFPD 10-13, 27 December 1993. Editor: SAF/AAIP (Ms Catherine H. Leason)
OPR: HQ USAF/XOXD (Lt Col James A. McClure) Pages: 6/Distribution: F
Certified by: HQ USAF/XOX (Maj Gen Richard C. Bethurem)

1.3.4. MAJCOMs may be assigned responsibility as PRA for Air Force or joint doctrine development projects when the appropriate expertise is not resident at the AFDC. They will normally be designated Technical Review Authority (TRA) for doctrine development in their areas of responsibility. They are responsible for developing, coordinating, and publishing MAJCOM and Multi-Command (MCM) 3-series tactical doctrine manuals. They also ensure that 3-series tactical doctrine manuals are consistent with Air Force and joint doctrine and provide copies of tactical doctrine manuals to the Director of Plans. They will provide an annual report by the end of each fiscal year to the Director of Plans describing the doctrine activity of agencies subordinate to the MAJCOM but comprised of more than one Service. These agencies include but are not limited to Air Land Sea Agency and Airlift Concepts and Requirements Agency. Additionally, MAJCOMs will comment on various Air Force, joint, or combined doctrine development projects, as requested; AFI 10-1301 sets forth specific procedures for commenting.

1.3.5. Air University, through the Center for Aerospace Doctrine Research and Education (CADRE), provides advice, assistance, and research support to the Director of Plans, the AFDC, MAJCOMs, and FOAs for doctrine development projects. Air University is also responsible for doctrine education within the Air Force.

1.3.6. Numbered Air Forces serving as Air Force component commands to unified commands will participate in joint doctrine development by providing comments on joint doctrine projects in the same manner as MAJCOMs.

1.3.7. Army-Air Force Center for Low Intensity Conflict (CLIC) will coordinate doctrine development activities pertaining to "Operations Other Than War" with the AFDC. It will also provide an annual report to the Air Force Director of Plans and the Directors of Plans of Air Combat Command and Air Mobility Command, detailing its doctrine development activities.

1.3.8. The Air Staff International Standardization Office (HQ USAF/XOXX (ISO)) will coordinate for staffing combined doctrine projects such as NATO Standardization Agreements (STANAGs); Air Standards and Advisory Publications of the Air Standardization Coordinating Committee; and those agreements of the American, British, Canadian, and Australian (ABCA) Armies and Navies that can affect air forces.

1.4. Related documents are AFI 10-1301; AFR 1-2, Assignment of Responsibilities for Development of Aerospace Doctrine; and Joint Pub 1-01, Joint Publication System.

1.5. See attachment 1 for measuring and displaying compliance with this policy.

1.6. See attachment 2 for an explanation of terms.

BUSTER C. GLOSSON, Lt General, USAF
DCS/Plans and Operations

2 Attachments
1. Measuring and Displaying Compliance With Policy
2. Terms and Definitions
MEASURING AND DISPLAYING COMPLIANCE WITH POLICY

A1.1. Compliance with Air Force doctrine policies will be assessed by measuring two areas, functions and processes. How many doctrine projects completed during a given time period perform the functions described in paragraph 1.2.1? How many doctrine projects were completed by following the processes described in AFI 10-1301? Measurement data will be tracked by quarters and then compiled and reported annually. By the end of the fiscal year, each MAJCOM will provide AFDC an RCS: HAF-XOX(A)9349, Annual Report of Doctrine Activity, describing the doctrine activity of agencies subordinate to the MAJCOM but comprised of more than one Service. These agencies include but are not limited to the Air Land Sea Agency and the Airlift Concepts and Requirements Agency. Additionally, the Army-Air Force Center for Low Intensity Conflict will also provide AFDC with the same report. The Air Force Doctrine Center will provide a consolidated report within 30 days to the Air Force Director of Plans through the Air Staff Doctrine Division. The measurement charts (figures A1.1, A1.2, and A1.3) will display trends in progress toward goals.

A1.1.1. Desired Functions. The policy is for Air Force doctrine to perform the functions described in paragraph 1.2.1. Each doctrine project in development will be considered in light of those functions. The goal here is for all of the doctrine projects to perform one or more of the functions described. This measurement will be displayed as a raw number of projects complying with the policy compared with the total number of projects in development on a quarterly basis (as shown in figure A1.1). The desired trend is upward.

A1.1.2. Deviations from Processes. The policy to follow the normal, approved doctrine development processes (as discussed in AFI 10-1301) will be assessed by comparing the number of doctrine projects with deviations to the total number of projects. This measurement will be displayed as both a raw number of projects and as a percentage (as shown in figures A1.2 and A1.3). The desired trend is downward.

Figure A1.1. Doctrine Projects and Projects with Desired Functions.

Figure A1.2 Doctrine Projects with Deviations and Total Projects.

Figure A1.3. Percentage of Projects with Deviations.

TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

A2.1. The following terms are used throughout this directive:

Basic Doctrine. Broad, enduring guidance for sound employment of aerospace forces in war. Unifying in effect, it describes principles, concepts, and considerations for using aerospace forces to solve military problems of all types.

Combined Doctrine. Fundamental principles that guide the employment of forces of two or more nations in coordinated action toward a common objective. It is ratified by participating nations. (JP 1-02)

Coordinating Review Authority. (DoD) An agency appointed by a Service or combatant command to coordinate with and assist the primary review authority in doctrine development, evaluation, and maintenance efforts. Each Service or combatant command must assign a coordinating review authority. If so authorized by the appointing Service or combatant command, coordinating review authority comments provided to designated primary review authorities should represent the position of the appointing Service or combatant command with regard to the publication under development. (JP 1-02)

Each Service and combatant command designates a Coordinating Review Authority (CRA) for each joint doctrine publication. The CRA is the single point of contact for, and presents the official positions of, the appointing Service or command to the Primary Review Authority. CRAs also develop Service distribution requirements.

Joint Doctrine. Fundamental principles that guide the employment of forces of two or more Services in coordinated action toward a common objective. It will be promulgated by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in consultation with the other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. (JP 1-02)

Joint Tactics, Techniques, And Procedures (JTTP). The actions and methods which implement joint doctrine and describe how forces will be employed in joint operations. They will be promulgated by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in consultation with the other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. (JP 1-02)

Lead Agent. (DoD) Individual Services, combatant commands, or Joint Staff directorates may be assigned as lead agents for developing and maintaining joint doctrine, joint tactics, techniques, and procedures (JTTP) publications, or joint administrative publications. The lead agent is responsible for developing, coordinating, reviewing, and maintaining an assigned doctrine, JTTP, or joint administrative publication. (JP 1-02)

Lead Agents are responsible for developing, coordinating, reviewing, and maintaining doctrine and tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) publications. Services, combatant commands, and Joint Staff directorates may be designated Lead Agent for joint doctrine and TTPs. The Director of Plans performs the duties of the Lead Agent, for the Air Force.

Multi-Service Doctrine. Fundamental principles that guide the employment of forces of two or more Services in coordinated action toward a common objective. It is ratified by two or more Services, and is promulgated in multi-Service publications that identify the participating Services, e.g., Army-Navy doctrine. (JP 1-02)

Operational Level Doctrine. Principles and ideas that guide the employment of aerospace forces in campaigns and major operations. More specifically than basic doctrine, it proposes ways aerospace forces can best be employed to solve specific military problems, attain specific types of objectives, achieve specific types of advantages, and attain national goals. Operational level doctrine anticipates technical and strategic needs. Operational level doctrine covers mission areas, operating environments, enabling functions, combat support operations, and other topics crucial to prepare aerospace forces and conduct sustained operations.

Primary Review Authority (PRA). (DoD) The organization assigned by the lead agent to perform the actions and coordination necessary to develop and maintain the assigned joint publication under cognizance of the lead agent. (JP 1-02)

Lead Agents appoint PRAs to perform the actions and coordination necessary to develop and maintain doctrine publications, under the cognizance of the Lead Agent.

Tactical Level Doctrine. Detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures to guide optimum employment of aerospace forces performing specific military tasks. Tactical doctrine presents alternatives, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and factors that determine or alter the effectiveness of specific options. Major commands publish tactical doctrine for their forces.

Technical Review Authority (TRA). The organization tasked to provide specialized technical or administrative expertise to the primary review authority or coordinating review authority for joint [or Air Force] publications. (JP 1-02, modified)

TRAs provide specialized expertise to the PRA or CRA. The Lead Agent obtains assistance from non-Air Force TRAs through the J-7, Joint Staff.