BY ORDER OF THE AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 38-101
SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE 29 JUNE 1994

Manpower and Organization

AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION

This instruction implements AFPD 38-1, Organization. It describes the objectives and principles of Air Force organization. It prescribes various levels and standard structures for organizations, and it outlines procedures for establishing and modifying organizations. Attachment 1 is a glossary of references, abbreviations, acronyms, and terms.

SUMMARY OF CHANGES

This revision aligns the instruction with AFPD 38-1.

Paragraph

Chapter 1--Air Force Organization Objectives, Principles, and Responsibilities
Organization Objectives 1.1
Organization Principles 1.2
Responsibilities Assigned 1.3

Chapter 2--Standard Levels of Air Force Organization and Associated Terms
Organizational Entities 2.1
Standard Levels of Air Force Organization 2.2
Standard Elements of Air Force Organization 2.3

Chapter 3--Standard Organizations
Organization Structure 3.1
Standard Numbered Air Force (NAF) 3.2
Standard Wing 3.3

Chapter 4--Terminology and Procedures for Organization Actions
Organization Actions 4.1
Organization Terminology . 4.2
Organization Procedures . 4.3

Chapter 5--Organization Changes
Staff Element 5.1
Organization Change Request 5.2
Testing New Organizations 5.3

Chapter 6--Organization Documentation
Implementation Authority 6.1
Distribution Requirements 6.2

Chapter 7--Air Force Organizational Planning Document
Introduction 7.1
Publication Authority 7.2
Contents 7.3
Unit Patches 7.4
Distribution 7.5

Figures
2.1. Organizational Schemes 5
3.1. Numbered Air Force Structure 9
3.2. Wing Structure 9
3.3. Wing Staff Structure 10
3.4. Operations Group Structure 10
3.5. Logistics Group Structure 11
3.6. Support Group Structure 11
3.7. Medical Group Structure 11
3.8. Operations Squadron Structure 12
3.9. Operations Support Squadron Structure 13
3.10. Logistics Support Squadron Structure 14
3.11. Maintenance Squadron Structure 15
3.12. Equipment Maintenance Squadron Structure 16
3.13. Component Repair Squadron Structure 16
3.14. Supply Squadron Structure 16
3.15. Transportation Squadron Structure 16
3.16. Contracting Squadron Structure 17
3.17. Mission Support Squadron Structure 17
3.18. Security Police Squadron Structure 18
3.19. Civil Engineer Squadron Structure 18
3.20. Services Squadron Structure 19
3.21. Communications Squadron Structure 20
6.1. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Constitute and Assign for Activation 24
6.2. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Reconstitute and Assign for Activation 25
6.3. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Redesignation 26
6.4. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Inactivation 27
6.5. Sample Special Order--Activate 27
6.6. Sample Special Order--Redesignate 28
6.7. Sample Special Order--Inactivate 28
6.8. Sample Special Order--Reassign 29
6.9. Sample Special Order--Attach 29
7.1. Sample AFOPD Organization Chart 31

Table
7.1. Sample AFOPD Manpower Data Table 32

Attachment
1. Glossary of References, Abbreviations, and Acronyms 34

Chapter 1

AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION OBJECTIVES, PRINCIPLES, AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1.1. Organization Objectives. Air Force organizations are designed to achieve the characteristics outlined in AFPD 38-1.

1.2. Organization Principles. Air Force organizational structure follows these management principles:

1.2.1. Emphasis on Wartime Tasks. Organizations must be structured to accomplish wartime tasks without reorganizing.

1.2.2. Functional Grouping. Organizations have these characteristics: a clear-cut purpose, goal and scope, with one individual in charge; parts that form a logical, separable activity; a close relationship among the parts, constituting a complete entity; and natural divisions of work that clearly define where responsibility begins and ends.

1.2.3. Lean Organizational Structures. Organizations must encourage rapid decisionmaking, so they should be flat structures without intermediate levels, unless mission requirements cannot otherwise be met. When used, intermediate organizations will consist of tactical functions only, without a full range of staff functions. Organizational levels that exist only to review and transmit information or tasking should be eliminated.

1.2.4. Skip-Echelon Structure. Major commands (MAJCOM) sit on top of a skip-echelon staffing structure. MAJCOMs, wings, and squadrons possess the full range of staff functions needed to perform required tasks; numbered Air Forces (NAF), groups, and flights have no or minimal staff. These tactical echelons are designed to increase operational effectiveness rather than to review and transmit paperwork. The chain of command and responsibility for mission accomplishment runs through commanders at all levels. Problems, however, often are solved by staff communication through the functional chain, bypassing echelons where the function is not found.

1.2.5. Standard Levels. The Air Force uses the standard levels described in chapter 2 to design organizations.

1.3. Responsibilities Assigned:

1.3.1. Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF) and the commands work toward meeting Air Force organizational goals. The Director of Programs and Evaluation, HQ USAF/PE, is responsible for leading and monitoring progress. HQ USAF functional chiefs give assistance in their functional areas.

1.3.2. HQ USAF/PE is responsible for the administrative control of all units in the Air Force. It publishes Department of the Air Force (DAF/PE) letters, which are the legal authority for a unit and authorize such actions as unit activations, redesignations, and inactivations.

1.3.3. MAJCOM, field operating agencies (FOA), and direct reporting units (DRU), must follow the organizational procedures, and standard structures described herein. A MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU must have HQ USAF/PE approval to deviate from a standard structure and to activate, redesignate, or inactivate units.

1.3.4. Individual unit commanders must use the standard organizational structures found in this instruction. If a unit's unique mission or location requires a different structure, a waiver to the standard structure can be obtained using the organizational change procedures found in chapter 5.

Chapter 2

STANDARD LEVELS OF AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND ASSOCIATED TERMS

2.1. Organizational Entities. The Air Force is comprised of establishments, units, and nonunits.

2.1.1. Establishment. An organizational entity consisting of a headquarters unit and its subordinate units. Subordinate units are assigned to the establishment and not to the headquarters unit.

2.1.1.1. A group with subordinate squadrons is generally the lowest-level establishment. Lower-level establish-ments are assigned to higher-level ones; for example: groups to wings, wings to NAFs, NAFs to MAJCOMs, MAJCOMs to HQ USAF. This arrangement (units reporting to establishments, subordinate establishments to superior ones) sets up the chain of command, through which all control and accountability flows.

2.1.1.2. Establishments facilitate organizational actions. For example, the reassignment of a wing (establishment) from one NAF to another automatically reassigns the wing's subordinate units.

2.1.2. Unit. A military organization constituted by directives issued by HQ USAF. A unit is either named or numbered.

2.1.2.1. A unit helps provide for an unbroken chain of command since military personnel must be assigned to a unit at all times. Each unit having military members must have an officer designated as its commander. While civilians in a unit may hold supervisory positions and provide work direction, they cannot assume military command.

2.1.2.2. The following terms apply to a unit:

2.1.2.2.1. Active Unit. A major command (MAJCOM), field operating agency (FOA), or direct reporting unit (DRU) constituted and activated by Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF); or a subordinate unit constituted by HQ USAF, assigned to a MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU and activated by special order.

2.1.2.2.2. Inactive Unit. A unit constituted by Headquarters US Air Force but not yet activated or a unit constituted, activated, and subsequently, inactivated.

2.1.2.2.3. Disbanded Unit. A unit whose legal authority for existence is withdrawn by Headquarters US Air Force. Its designation is retired and preserved in historical records.

2.1.2.2.4. Parent Unit. An organization that directly administers units, detachments, or operating locations assigned to it.

2.1.2.2.5. Provisional Unit. A temporary unit organized to perform a specific task.

2.1.2.2.6. Attached Unit. A unit, or part of a unit, placed under the control of another organization for a specific purpose such as operational control, administrative control, or logistic support. It is still assigned to the parent unit.

2.1.2.2.7. Detached Unit. A unit serving away from its unit of assignment. It may function independently, or may be attached to another organization.

2.1.3. Nonunit. An organizational entity that is not constituted by Headquarters US Air Force as a unit.

2.1.3.1. The following terms apply to a nonunit:

2.1.3.1.1. Named Activity. A part of a unit whose mission can be identified better by assigning it a definitive name (for example, the School of Engineering is part of a unit, the Air Force Institute of Technology). Headquarters US Air Force is responsible for administrative control of named activities and authorizes them by issuing DAF/PE letters.

2.1.3.1.2. Detachment. Part of a unit that is separated geographically from its parent unit. Although not a unit for organizational purposes, it has legal standing under the Uniform Code of Military Justice if a commissioned officer is on duty and appointed on orders as commander.

2.1.3.1.3. Operating Location. Part of a unit that is separated geographically from its parent unit. It is used to account for personnel by location. Personnel remain assigned to the parent unit. An operating location has none of the administrative attributes of a unit.

2.1.3.1.4. Squadron Section. A function responsible for the administrative control of all members assigned to a unit. A squadron section is created by appointing a squadron section commander on special orders. NOTE: If the unit commander terminates the administrative command authority of the squadron section commander, the squadron section reverts to unit administration and the individual in charge becomes its chief.

2.1.3.1.5. Air Force Element. The nomenclature used to account for manpower authorizations and to identify Air Force personnel on duty with agencies outside the Air Force. Although not a unit for organizational purposes, an element may function as a unit if so designated and a commissioned officer eligible to command either assumes command or is appointed on orders as commander.

2.2. Standard Levels of Air Force Organization. The following standard levels of organization are used in structuring and designating Air Force units:

2.2.1. Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). The senior headquarters of the Air Force, consisting of two major entities: the Secretariat (including the Secretary of the Air Force and the Secretary's principal staff), and the Air Staff, headed by the Chief of Staff.

2.2.2. Major Command (MAJCOM). A major subdivision of the Air Force, directly subordinate to Headquarters US Air Force. MAJCOMs are management headquarters and thus have the full range of functional staff. MAJCOMs, in turn, may be subdivided according to either of the organizational schemes shown in figure 2.1. The levels are in descending order and represent levels of assignment. For example, a group may be assigned to any organization listed above it, but a group may not be assigned to another group or to a squadron. The terms below Center represent internal staff structure and are not units as defined in paragraph 2.1.2.

Major Command Major Command
Numbered Air Force Center
Wing
Group Directorate*
Squadron Division
Flight Branch
Section

Figure 2.1. Organizational Schemes.

2.2.3. Direct Reporting Unit (DRU). A subdivision of the Air Force, directly subordinate to the Chief of Staff, US Air Force. A DRU performs a mission that does not fit into any of the MAJCOMs. A DRU has many of the same administrative and organizational responsibilities as a MAJCOM.

2.2.3.1. Major Command Direct Reporting Unit (MAJCOM DRU). DRU also applies to a subdivision of a MAJCOM. A MAJCOM DRU reports directly to the MAJCOM commander and performs a mission that does not fit into any of the MAJCOM's primary subordinate units.

2.2.4. Field Operating Agency (FOA). A subdivision of the Air Force, directly subordinate to a Headquarters US Air Force functional manager. An FOA performs field activities beyond the scope of any of the major commands.

2.2.4.1. Major Command (MAJCOM) Field Operating Agency (FOA). FOA also applies to a subdivision of a MAJCOM. A MAJCOM FOA reports directly to a MAJCOM functional manager and performs specialized field activities beyond the scope of any of the MAJCOM's primary subordinate units.

2.2.5. Numbered Air Force (NAF). A level of command directly under a MAJCOM. NAFs are tactical echelons that provide operational leadership and supervision. They are not management headquarters and do not have complete functional staffs. Many NAFs are

responsible for MAJCOM operations in a specific geographic region or theater of operations. The number of persons assigned to an NAF headquarters is flexible and varies from case to case. An NAF is assigned subordinate units, such as wings, groups, and squadrons.

2.2.6. Wing. A level of command below the numbered Air Force. A wing has approximately 1,000 to 5,000 persons. A wing may be either an operational wing, an air base wing, or a specialized mission wing:

2.2.6.1. Operational Wing. A wing that has an operations group and related operational mission activity assigned to it. When an operational wing performs the primary mission of the base, it usually maintains and operates the base. In addition, an operational wing is capable of self-support in functional areas like maintenance, supply, and munitions, as needed. When an operational wing is a tenant organization, the host command provides it with varying degrees of base and logistics support.

2.2.6.2. Air Base Wing. A wing that performs a support rather than an operational mission. It maintains and operates a base. An air base wing often provides functional support to a major command (MAJCOM) headquarters.

2.2.6.3. Specialized Mission Wing. A wing that performs a specialized mission and usually does not have aircraft or missiles assigned to it. For example, intelligence wing, training wing, and so on. This wing may be either a host wing or a tenant wing, depending on whether it maintains and operates the base.

2.2.7. Group. A level of command below the wing. Like the numbered Air Force, it is a tactical echelon without significant staff support. A dependent group is a mission, logistics, support, medical, or large functional unit, for example, civil engineers, security police, and so on. Such groups may possess small supporting staff elements, such as standardization and evaluation or quality control, that are organized as sections. They may also contain specialized flights such as a rescue flight or operations support aircraft flight. An independent group has the same functions and responsibilities as a like-type wing but its scope and size do not warrant wing-level designation. A group has approximately 500 to 2,000 persons.

2.2.8. Squadron. The basic unit in the Air Force. A squadron may be either a mission unit, such as an operational flying squadron, or a functional unit, such as a civil engineer, security police, or transportation squadron. Squadrons vary in size according to responsibility. A squadron has approximately 50 to 750 persons.

2.2.9. Flight. If internal subdivision is required, a flight may consist of sections, then elements. A flight may be either a numbered flight, an alpha flight, or a functional flight.

2.2.9.1. Numbered Flight. The lowest level unit in the Air Force. A flight primarily incorporates smaller elements into an organized unit. Its administrative characteristics, such as strength reporting, are like those of a squadron.

2.2.9.2. Alpha Flight. Part of a squadron (usually a mission squadron) and composed of several elements performing identical missions. Because an alpha flight is not a unit, it is not subject to unit reporting.

2.2.9.3. Functional Flight. Usually part of a squadron and composed of elements performing specific missions. Because a functional flight is not a unit, it is not subject to unit reporting.

2.2.10. Center. A named unit that performs a specialized mission. A primary characteristic is that it performs most of its mission within a large complex at one location; for example, air logistics centers and test centers. Usually, it has only a few subordinate units.

2.2.11. Laboratory. Similar to a center except that it performs a research or advanced development mission.

2.2.12. Region. A term sometimes used when organization is geographic.

2.2.13. Combat Operations Staff (COS). A unit, directly subordinate to Headquarters US Air Force or to a major command, that performs a specialized mission of ensuring the readiness of combat forces. A COS is composed of nonmanagement headquarters, combat-related activities such as Operations, Operations Plans (OPlan), Intelligence, and Logistics. The major command (MAJCOM) commander usually serves in a dual role, functioning as the COS Director as well as MAJCOM commander.

2.3. Standard Elements of Air Force Organization. The following terms describe the organizational elements within command and staff functions.

2.3.1. Command:

2.3.1.1. Commander. An officer who occupies a position of command pursuant to orders of appointment or by assumption of command according to AFI 51-604, Appointment to and Assumption of Command. This designation is used in all Air Force units except:

2.3.1.1.1. US Air Force Academy, which is commanded by a superintendent.

2.3.1.1.2. School organizations, which are commanded by commandants.

2.3.1.2. Vice Commander. An officer who shares a commander's duties and acts for the commander during the commander's absence. If command is properly assumed or appointed under the provisions of AFI 51-604 a vice commander may exercise all command authority. This designation is used at major command through wing level only.

2.3.1.3. Installation Commander. The host unit commander. This individual discharges the duties directed by US statutes or Air Force directives to be performed by the installation commander.

2.3.1.4. Deputy Commander. An officer who shares the commander's duties and acts for the commander during the commander's absence. If command is properly assumed or appointed under AFI 51-604, a deputy commander may exercise all command authority. This designation is used at group level.

2.3.2. Staff:

2.3.2.1. Chief of Staff (CSAF). Title held only by the Chief of Staff, US Air Force.

2.3.2.2. Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS). An officer who oversees a major portion of the Air Staff and who reports directly to the Chief of Staff. A DCS supervises the activities of directorates and field operating agencies.

2.3.2.3. Directorate. A staff element at Headquarters US Air Force or major command level. Directors are often general officers. This is a decisionmaking level which performs a range of related staff functions. Normally, a directorate supervises the activities of divisions and field operating agencies.

2.3.2.4. Division. A staff element in Headquarters US Air Force, major command, numbered Air Force, or equivalent. Normally, a division performs a specific portion of a directorate's mission. Division chiefs are often colonels. Normally, divisions supervise the activities of branches.

2.3.2.5. Branch. A staff element that performs a specific portion of a division's mission. Branches may be further subdivided into sections and elements.

Chapter 3

STANDARD ORGANIZATIONS

3.1. Organization Structure. This chapter prescribes standard organizational structures for use to the lowest level shown. Illustrative figures include approved organizational titles (figures 3.1 through 3.21).

3.1.1. Organizational Variations. Each figure depicts a standard organizational structure for a particular unit or function. HQ USAF/PE must approve any variations from standard structure. Commands submit variation requests as described in chapter 5 of this instruction when a standard function does not exist at a location, when functions are combined due to small size, or when units are responsible for activities not accounted for in standard structures.

3.1.2. Functions and Responsibilities. Each figure depicts the standard organizational structure and lists typical functions and responsibilities performed by an organization. These functions and responsibilities are not comprehensive, but are intended to give an understanding of activity that fits in each organizational block.

3.2. Standard Numbered Air Force (NAF). The NAF is a tactical echelon directly under an operational MAJCOM (figure 3.1). NAFs are structured to perform an operational or warfighting mission, often oriented to a specific geographic region. An NAF is assigned operational units, such as wings, groups, and squadrons.

3.2.1. The operational focus of the NAF ensures the readiness of assigned forces; prepares forces for deployment and employment; plans for beddown of forces; and exercises operational control of assigned forces. Often, the NAF commander can anticipate assignment as Air Force component commander; i.e., Air Force Forces (AFFOR) commander, or Joint Task Force commander for contingency operations. Assigned forces include Air Operations, Air Intelligence, Air Communications, Combat Communications, and specialized heavy engineering (RED HORSE) groups/squadrons.

3.2.2. A specialized staff, charged with integrating and optimizing assigned forces, works directly for the NAF commander. Assigned functions include Safety, Standardization/Evaluation, Staff Judge Advocate, and Inspector General.

3.3. Standard Wing. The standard wing (figure 3.2) generates and employs combat capability. One commander has the authority and responsibility to command the wing. Generally, only the wing staff and four group commanders report directly to the wing commander. Thus, the wing commander concentrates on the wing's primary mission and delegates authority to subordinates so they can accomplish their responsibilities. Major wing functions are divided among a few principal subordinates, each accountable for carrying out a specific part of the wing mission. Responsibilities are clearly defined and duplication is avoided. While the standard wing is organized for combat operations, its basic structure is applied to all types of wings (for instance, air base and special mission wings).

3.3.1. Staffing of a Standard Wing. A wing is organized as an operational unit with manpower requirements set at those levels required for mission success. A standard or core manpower level exists for each organization defined in this instruction (see AFI 38-201, Determining Manpower Requirements (formerly AFR 26-1, volume 3).

3.3.2. Wing Staff Organization. Wing staff functions report to the wing commander (figure 3.3). A wing staff function may be referred to as an office, for example: a public affairs office, or a manpower office. The senior staff member is referred to as the chief. Wing staff personnel are attached to the mission support squadron for administrative and Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) purposes.

3.3.2.1. Public Affairs. Advises and counsels the commander and staff on public affairs factors affecting mission accomplishment. Responsible for communicating with news media and community leaders, as well as the internal audience, about issues affecting the Air Force.

3.3.2.2. Safety. Conducts flight, weapons, and ground safety programs, as well as nuclear surety, when required.

3.3.2.3. History. Provides commander and staff with historical reference assistance and other historical services. Researches and writes special studies, papers, and periodic unit histories. Assembles and maintains historical repository. Prepares for deployment to support wartime and contingency requirements.

3.3.2.4. Staff Judge Advocate. Provides commander and subordinate units advice and counsel on military justice, claims, contracts, operational law, international law, environmental law, civil, and other legal matters.

3.3.2.5. Command Post. Basic wing command post includes the Operations Control Center, Maintenance Control Center, and Survival Recovery Center. It also includes, where possible, other 24-hour posts whose normal nonduty hour functions can be done by command post duty personnel using checklists or recall rosters.

3.3.2.6. Chaplain. Provides worship and religious education; performs pastoral care, ministry of presence, rites, and sacraments; and advises the commander, as necessary.

3.3.2.7. Comptroller. Primary financial advisor to the commander and staff. Provides financial analysis and financial services, including budget requirements, execution, and analysis, cost and economic analysis, disbursing, pay services, and liaison with the Defense Finance and Accounting Service.

3.3.2.8. Manpower. Provides manpower management support to wing commander and staff, participates in wartime contingency planning and support, administers quality Air Force, productivity and suggestion programs, and maintains the base manpower data and wartime manpower data systems.

3.3.2.9. Plans. Combines operations and logistics plans. Develops operations plans, administers support agreements, and evaluates exercises.

3.3.2.10. Social Actions. Provides programs to promote equal opportunity and equal treatment, conducts human relations education, and conducts substance abuse education and treatment.

3.3.3. Operations Group:

3.3.3.1. The operations group operates and maintains primary mission equipment (figure 3.4).

3.3.3.2. Standardization and evaluation and quality assurance will be separate staff elements.

3.3.4. Logistics Group:

3.3.4.1. The logistics group supports the primary mission with materiel and resources. This includes supply, transportation, contracting, and intermediate level maintenance (figure 3.5).

3.3.4.2. Normally, the logistics group has one maintenance squadron. If the result is a maintenance squadron with over 700 authorizations, a request for an additional maintenance squadron may be submitted to HQ USAF/PE.

3.3.5. Support Group. The support group provides base support and services (figure 3.6).

3.3.5.1. Noncommissioned Officer (NCO) Academy. At locations with an NCO academy, the academy will be a functional flight assigned to the support group commander. An NCO academy will be named after its host base and established as a named activity; an example is the Lackland NCO Academy.

3.3.6. Medical Support. See figure 3.7 for a standard medical group structure. Squadron structures are under review and will be illustrated in the next revision to this instruction.

Figure 3.1. Numbered Air Force Structure.

Figure 3.2. Wing Structure.

Figure 3.3. Wing Staff Structure.

Figure 3.4. Operations Group Structure.

Figure 3.5. Logistics Group Structure.

Figure 3.6. Support Group Structure.

Figure 3.7. Medical Group Structure.

Organizational Variations. Intelligence functions found in the squadron may be combined with the intelligence function in the Operations Support Squadron. For large aircraft the Phase function may be placed within the maintenance flight of the maintenance squadron.

Figure 3.8. Operations Squadron Structure.

Operations Support Squadron Functions and Responsibilities:

Operations Support Squadron. Includes squadron commander and administrative support. Functions consist of:

Figure 3.9. Operations Support Squadron Structure.

Logistics Support Squadron Functions and Responsibilities:

Maintenance Operations Flight. Tracks aircraft engine status (time changes, special inspections, etc.) for all possessed engines; coordinates logistics group inputs to flying schedules; handles financial, personnel, and facility management for the logistics group; performs maintenance analysis for the logistics group.

Maintenance Training Flight. Provides maintenance training for all wing maintenance personnel; provides Air Force engineering technical services; and manages aircraft battle damage repair training.

Logistics Plans Flight (Optional). ACC, USAFE, and PACAF are authorized a variation to form operations and logistics plans functions in the operations support squadron and logistics support squadron to accommodate their deployment missions.

Figure 3.10. Logistics Support Squadron Structure.

Maintenance Squadron Organizational Variations. If a squadron exceeds 700 authorizations, commands may establish two squadrons. If two maintenance squadrons are needed, they must be designated equipment maintenance squadron (figure 3.12) and component repair squadron (figure 3.13).

Maintenance Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Squadron functions include:

Figure 3.11. Maintenance Squadron Structure.

Figure 3.12. Equipment Maintenance Squadron Structure.

Figure 3.13. Component Repair Squadron Structure.

Figure 3.14. Supply Squadron Structure.

Figure 3.15. Transportation Squadron Structure.

Contracting Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. The contracting squadron processes and manages service and commodities contracts, architectural and engineering negotiated contracts, construction contracts, commodities, small purchase orders, blanket purchase orders, and contract repair services.

Organization Variations. Contracting squadrons with significant workload in acquisition and services contracts may form a specialized contracting flight within the contracting squadron. MAJCOMs will submit requests to establish a specialized contracting flight to HQ USAF/PE under this instruction.

Figure 3.16. Contracting Squadron Structure.

Mission Support Squadron Functions and Responsibilities:

Military Personnel Flight. Manages the military work force. Performs wartime contingency planning and support, operates and maintains MANPER-B systems, trains Personnel Support for Contingency Operation team members, authenticates Contingency Exercise Mobility orders, and processes personnel for mobility, emergency, and wartime contingencies. Oversees and handles records, training, inbound and outbound assignments, quality force, and awards and decorations.

Civilian Personnel Flight. Manages civilian work force. Oversees and handles the affirmative employment, labor and employee management relations, training program management, position classification, data management, resource management, and career program administration. Consolidated offices provide select servicing and oversight for activity and satellite personnel offices. Levels and types of service available depend on the type and size of civilian personnel flight.

Information Management Flight. Provides information management support to the wing to include developing and implementing policy to manage information throughout its life cycle; specifically--management and distribution of administrative communications and mail, management duplicating services, access programs (Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act), information collection programs (Reports Control Symbol reports), and records management.

Education Services Flight. Provides educational services, to include assessing the needs, managing resources, counseling, and testing. Obtains and manages on-base institutions and academic programs.

Airman Professional Military Education (PME) Flight. Provides for the program management, instruction, and support of an Airman Leadership School.

Family Support Flight. Provides information and referral counseling, leadership consultation, base family action plans, and assistance programs including Relocation and Transition Assistance Programs.

Figure 3.17. Mission Support Squadron Structure.

Figure 3.18. Security Police Squadron Structure.

Figure 3.19. Civil Engineer Squadron Structure.

Services Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Squadron functions include:

Figure 3.20. Services Squadron Structure.

Communications Squadron Functions and Responsibilities. Provides Command, Control, and Communication (C3) systems, operations, support, and maintenance. Provides base level computer support, training, equipment maintenance, direct customer assistance and visual information service. Maintains and operates on- and off-base computers, radios, radars, and communication centers. Interfaces with the Federal Communications Commission, develops contingency plans, provides technical analysis of base requirements, and assesses the impact of new communications systems on existing systems.

Figure 3.21. Communications Squadron Structure.

Chapter 4

TERMINOLOGY AND PROCEDURES FOR ORGANIZATION ACTIONS

4.1. Organization Actions. The terminology and related procedures outlined in this chapter will be used to make an organization change.
4.2. Organization Terminology:

4.2.1. Constitute. Provide the legal authority for a new unit by designating it in a Department of the Air Force (DAF/PE) letter.

4.2.2. Disband. Withdraw the legal authority for a unit. The designation of the unit is retired and preserved in historical records.

4.2.3. Reconstitute. Renew legal authorization of a disbanded unit.

4.2.4. Activate. Bring into existence a constituted unit, a detachment of a unit, or a provisional unit. An active unit can legally function as specified by directives.

4.2.5. Inactivate. End the existence of a unit, detachment of a unit, or provisional unit. An inactive unit retains its lineage, history, and honors, and is available for activation when needed again.

4.2.6. Designate. Give an official name (or a number and name).

4.2.7. Redesignate. Change the name or number.

4.2.8. Consolidate. To combine two or more organizations by merging their lineage into a single line to form a single organization. Consolidation usually applies to organizations that were active at different times but have the same numerical designations or similar functions.

4.2.9. Assign. Place a unit with an existing military organization.

4.2.10. Attach. Place a unit, or part of a unit, with a military organization other than its parent organization, without making it a part of that organization. A unit, or part of a unit, may be attached for operational control, administrative control, and logistic support.

4.2.10.1. Operational Control. The control exercised by a commander or constituted authority over persons or units to compose forces, to assign tasks, to designate objectives, and to give directions through subordinate commanders for the conduct of operations.

4.2.10.2. Administrative Control. Direction or exercise of authority over subordinate or other organizations regarding administrative and other matters not included in the operational mission of the subordinate or other organizations. Examples of administrative control are UCMJ authority, personnel classification, effectiveness reports, granting leaves, and so on.

4.2.10.3. Logistic Support. The support provided by one organization to another, enabling that organization to carry out operations. Examples include supply, maintenance, transportation, and contracting. An order that states a unit is attached for logistic support only clearly means operational control and administrative control are not responsibilities of the commander to which the unit is attached. The order itself does not detail the extent and kind of logistic support, as this support is clarified through separate documents, such as host tenant support agreements.

4.3. Organization Procedures. The following procedures apply to organization entities within the Air Force.

4.3.1. Establishments:

4.3.1.1. An establishment is automatically created when a headquarters unit is activated.

4.3.1.2. An establishment is controlled through its headquarters. However, subordinate units are assigned to the establishment, not to the headquarters unit. This enables each unit within an establishment to have a separate identity. The fact that the headquarters unit controls the establishment, places the other units subordinate to it. Personnel are assigned to a unit, not to an establishment.

4.3.1.3. The assignment of any establishment assigns all its components at the same time, unless otherwise specified. For example, when a wing is assigned to an NAF, the command assignment of the wing's groups and squadrons also is to the NAF. The separation of units by location does not affect their assignment to the establishment.

4.3.1.4. Inactivation of a headquarters unit automatically inactivates the establishment. Units assigned to the establishment automatically revert, unless otherwise directed, to the next higher level.

4.3.2. Units:

4.3.2.1. HQ USAF issues a DAF/PE letter to constitute and activate MAJCOMs, FOAs, and DRUs. For a unit

subordinate to a MAJCOM, HQ USAF constitutes the unit and assigns it to the command for activation. The MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU will activate and assign the unit by issuing a G-Series Order citing the DAF/PE letter as authority. A DAF/PE letter also can authorize a command to redesignate or inactivate a unit. An inactivated unit reverts to the control of HQ USAF. DAF/PE letters and G-Series Orders follow the formats prescribed in chapter 7.

4.3.2.2. A MAJCOM may reassign a unit unless the unit's assignment is specified in a DAF/PE letter or by a standard structure prescribed in this instruction.

4.3.2.3. A unit may be reassigned from one MAJCOM to another. In this case, the losing command (after coordinating with the gaining command) requests HQ USAF/PE approve the reassignment on a date agreed to by both commands. If only unit reassignments are involved, the DAF/PE letter directs the reassignment of such units and copies are sent to both commands. If reassignment and movement occur at the same time, the movement directive issued per AFI 16-403, Program Management of Installations and Units Data and Movement of Units, also serves as the reassignment directive.

4.3.2.4. The effective date of an organization action (for example, activation, inactivation, or redesignation) is either published in the DAF/PE letter or in orders issued by the MAJCOM. An action effective on or about a certain date must occur no more than 15 calendar days before or after that date.

4.3.2.5. Numbered flights are units and require the same organization procedures as other units. Alpha and functional flights, however, are not considered to be units and are not subject to this chapter's procedures.

4.3.3. Nonunits:

4.3.3.1. Detachments:

4.3.3.1.1. A MAJCOM may activate a detachment for a function that is geographically separated from its parent unit. A detachment is activated to fill a need for command or supervision, or for other reasons, such as to facilitate unit movement. If there is a need for command authority, the senior officer on duty with a detachment is appointed on orders as detachment commander. Otherwise, the senior officer, enlisted member, or civilian is designated detachment chief.

4.3.3.1.2. Detachments are numbered in sequence, beginning with 1.

4.3.3.1.3. The inactivation of a parent unit automatically inactivates its detachments.

4.3.3.1.4. Detachments are identified on AF Form 1726, Personnel Accounting Symbol Actions.

4.3.3.2. Operating Location (OL):

4.3.3.2.1. An OL may be activated by a MAJCOM.

4.3.3.2.2. An OL is a geographically separated location where persons are required to perform permanent duty and the command supervision or other features provided by a detachment are not needed.

4.3.3.2.3. An OL is not a location separated from an installation to which persons are transported to work.

4.3.3.2.4. Manpower authorizations for an OL are reported with the location where duty is being performed. OLs (including OLs of detachments) are identified on AF Form 1726, according to AFMAN 26-749.

4.3.3.3. Provisional Unit:

4.3.3.3.1. MAJCOMs may activate provisional units as required. A MAJCOM G-Series Order provides the legal authority for a provisional unit. The effective date of the activation and inactivation of a provisional unit must be documented according to AFI 84-101, Historical Products, Services, and Requirements.

4.3.3.3.2. A provisional unit is attached rather than assigned to a permanent unit, thereby establishing the necessary command relationship. Likewise, personnel are not permanently assigned to a provisional unit, but are attached for duty. A provisional unit may be assigned to a higher provisional unit.

4.3.3.4. Unit Administration:

4.3.3.4.1. A large functional unit is authorized a unit administration function to perform administrative duties.

4.3.3.4.2. A commander of a large unit (squadron or above with over 250 military authorized) may delegate administrative control of all assigned members to a unit administration function by appointing a squadron section commander on special orders. If a section commander is appointed, the unit administration function becomes a squadron section.

4.3.3.4.2.1. If the unit commander terminates the administrative command authority of the squadron section commander, then the squadron section reverts to Unit Administration and the individual in charge becomes its chief.

4.3.3.5. Air Force Elements:

4.3.3.5.1. An element may be designated as a unit (and commander appointed) by the senior Air Force officer of the unified or specified command or the defense agency or defense field agency which exercises operational control over the element. The Commander, 11 Support Wing, will exercise such authority over Air Force elements not within such command or agency. The designating officer may attach Air Force members assigned to the command to such elements.

4.3.3.5.2. A commander of an Air Force element may delegate administrative control of its members to subordinate officer by issuing orders appointing that individual as the Air Force element section commander. A commander of a large, geographically dispersed element may appoint more than one element section commander and will designate which members are attached to each section.

Chapter 5

ORGANIZATION CHANGES

5.1. Staff Element. MAJCOMs and their subordinate units (through their manpower and organization office) must have HQ USAF/PE approval to activate, inactivate, or redesignate a unit or to vary from any policy, procedure, or standard organization depicted in this instruction. Also, HQ USAF/PE will approve all major staff element changes (directorate or equivalent level) to MAJCOM headquarters.
5.1.1. A variation includes any addition, deletion, or merger of functions shown on a standard organization chart.

5.1.2. MAJCOMs are required by AFI 84-101 to submit to the Air Force Historical Research Agency a monthly report of any changes in organizations using RCS: HAF-HO(M)7401, Air Force Organization Status Change Report..

5.2. Organization Change Request. A request for organization action such as unit activation, inactivation, redesignation, or variation to a standard structure must include a proposed or updated mission directive, and answers to the following questions, as they apply. A request for organization action is not required for units inactivating as a result of an approved force structure action. A MAJCOM, after notifying HQ USAF/PE, may return a changed organization to a prescribed configuration.

5.2.1. What is the proposed action? (Be specific: activation, inactivation, nomenclature change, reorganization, or variation request.)

5.2.2. Why is the action needed? (Are there Air Force or command instructions that have changed? Is there a change in mission or concept of operation? Include substantiating Air Force directives.)

5.2.3. What is the structure of the new organization? (Include current and proposed organization and function charts reflecting the resources associated with both. Show authorized and proposed manpower by officer, airman, and civilian. Explain manpower changes.)

5.2.4. How does the structure compare with the standard structure and nomenclature? (Justify differences.)

5.2.5. What are the potential impacts on other organizations (base, command, or Air Force-wide)?

5.2.6. Why is it better? (Identify enhancements, improvements, benefits, examples of increased mission capability, and so on. Generalized statements such as increases mission capability or reduces span of control are not adequate as justifications.)

5.2.7. What is the impact the organization request has on unit history? (Provide unit histories and emblems.)

5.3. Testing New Organizations. MAJCOMs may develop and test new organizations. The purpose of an organization test is to evaluate the new organization's effectiveness under actual working conditions and resolve most common problems before committing affected functions to change. A test involving an organization structure found in this instruction requires HQ USAF/PE approval. A test plan should be submitted for approval at least 120 calendar days before the proposed start of the test. The test plan should include:

5.3.1. Answers to the questions in paragraph 5.2, as they apply.

5.3.2. Dates of the test period (not to exceed 1 year).

5.3.3. After completing the test period, the MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU sends results and recommendations to HQ USAF/PE. A waiver request is included if a permanent organization change is desired.

Chapter 6

ORGANIZATION DOCUMENTATION

6.1. Implementation Authority. HQ USAF, MAJCOM, FOA, and DRU manpower and organization functions are responsible for publishing the legal and authoritative documents needed to implement organization actions.
6.1.1. Department of the Air Force (DAF/PE) Letters. DAF/PE letters constitute, reconstitute, disband, consolidate, activate, inactivate, redesignate, assign and reassign (between commands) Air Force units. DAF/PE letters serve as authority for MAJCOM, FOA, and DRU unit organization actions. DAF/PE letters follow the formats outlined in figures 6.1 through 6.4.

6.1.1.1. Effective Date. The effective date of an organization action is either published in the DAF/PE letter or in the order issued by a MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU. When a DAF/PE letter allows the effective date to be on or about a certain date, the organization action must occur no more than 15 calendar days before or after that date.

6.1.2. G-Series Orders. These orders are published to activate, inactivate, redesignate, assign, and reassign units and detachments subordinate to a MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU; and to attach one unit to another. A MAJCOM, FOA, or DRU manpower and organization function may authenticate and publish G-Series Orders using the formats in figures 6.5 through 6.9.

6.1.2.1. Guidelines for G-Series Orders:

6.1.2.1.1. Numbering G-Series Orders. Orders are numbered in sequence starting with number one (for example, GS-1, GS-2, and so on). Begin a new sequence each fiscal year.

6.1.2.1.2. Effective Date. The effective date of the action described in the order is the date of the order, unless a different effective date is specified.

6.1.2.1.3. Distribution. Send all organizations impacted by the order a copy. Commands are encouraged to develop standard distribution lists. Orders involving medical units must include the Air Force Medical Support Agency on distribution.

6.1.2.2. G-Series Order Organization Actions:

6.1.2.2.1. Activation and Assignment. Include the title of unit; station; unit or establishment of assignment; effective date; and authority (figure 6.5).

6.1.2.2.2. Redesignation. Include the old and new unit or detachment designation; the station, unit, and establishment of assignment, as applicable; the effective date; and the authority (figure 6.6). (Redesignation applies to detachments.)

6.1.2.2.3. Inactivation. Include the designation of unit being inactivated; the station, the effective date, the disposition of personnel and equipment, statement that funds will be disposed of according to Air Force directives, and the authority (figure 6.7). (Inactivation applies to detachments.)

6.1.2.2.4. Reassignment. Include the designation of next higher unit from which the unit is relieved, the next higher unit to which the unit is assigned, the effective date of transfer (figure 6.8).

6.1.2.2.5. Attachment of One Unit to Another. Include the unit and MAJCOM to which attached, the effective date of attachment, the purpose of attachment, and the authority (figure 6.9).

6.2. Distribution Requirements. Each MAJCOM manpower and organization function will ensure HQ USAF/PEO is on distribution to receive special orders, command organization charts, mission directives, and instructions relating to organizations within their command.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
WASHINGTON DC 20330-1070

FROM: DAF/PE 119r 22 January 1994

SUBJECT: Activation of the 12th Supply Squadron

TO: AETC/CC

1. By order of the Secretary of the Air Force, the 12th Supply Squadron is constituted today. It is assigned to the Air Education and Training Command for activation on or about 16 April 1994.

a. Prepare a mission directive per AFI 10-101, within 60 calendar days of the date of unit action.

b. Configure the organization per AFI 38-101.

c. Issue a G-series order per AFI 38-101.

d. HQ US Air Force will accomplish any future redesignation or inactivation.

2. Report the completed action using RCS: HAF-HO(M)7401, Air Force Organization Status Change Report, and Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) per the current instructions.

FOR THE CHIEF OF STAFF

Figure 6.1. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Constitute and Assign for Activation.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
WASHINGTON, DC 20330-1070

FROM: DAF/PE 123r 23 December 1993

SUBJECT: Activation of HQ 12th Logistics Group

TO: AETC/CC

1. By order of the Secretary of the Air Force, HQ 12th Maintenance and Supply Group, disbanded 2 October 1945, is today reconstituted and redesignated HQ 12th Logistics Group. It is assigned to the Air Education and Training Command for activation on or about 16 April 1994.

a. Prepare a mission directive per AFI 10-101, within 60 calendar days of unit action.

b. Configure the organization per AFI 38-101.

c. Issue a G-series order per AFI 38-101.

d. HQ US Air Force will accomplish any future redesignation or inactivation.

e. Upon activation, the unit above is entitled to all honors belonging to the unit disbanded as indicated. The Air Force Historical Research Agency will automatically forward the historical data, including information on all honors and approved emblems to Air Education and Training Command. Flags or streamers authorized for this unit may be requisitioned under current directives.

2. Report the completed action using RCS: HAF-HO(M)7401, Air Force Organization Status Change Report, and Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) per the current instructions.

FOR THE CHIEF OF STAFF

Figure 6.2. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Reconstitute and Assign for Activation.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
WASHINGTON DC 20330-1070

FROM: DAF/PE 392r 8 July 1993

SUBJECT: Redesignation of the 539th Air Force Band

TO: AETC/CC

1. By order of the Secretary of the Air Force, the 539th Air Force Band is redesignated the Air Education and Training Command Band on or about 16 October 1993.

a. Revise the mission directive per AFI 10-101, within 60 calendar days of unit action.

b. Configure the organization per AFI 38-101.

c. Issue a G-series order per AFI 38-101.

d. HQ US Air Force will accomplish any future redesignation or inactivation.

2. Report the completed action using RCS: HAF-HO(M)7401, Air Force Organization Status Change Report, and Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) per the current instructions.

FOR THE CHIEF OF STAFF

Figure 6.3. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Redesignation.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
WASHINGTON DC 20330-1070

FROM: DAF/PE 420r 18 December 1993

SUBJECT: Inactivation of the 3200th Student Squadron

TO: AETC/CC

1. By order of the Secretary of the Air Force, the 3200th Student Squadron will be inactivated on or about 16 May 1994. Concurrently, the unit designation will revert to the control of the Department of the Air Force. Upon inactivation, consult AFI 84-101 for disposing of flags and other historic artifacts.

a. Revise the mission directive per AFI 10-101, within 60 calendar days of unit action.

b. Issue a G-series order per AFI 38-101.

c. HQ US Air Force will accomplish any future redesignation or activation.

2. Report the completed action using RCS: HAF-HO(M)7401, Air Force Organization Status Change Report, and Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) per the current instructions.

FOR THE CHIEF OF STAFF

Figure 6.4. Sample DAF/PE Letter--Inactivation.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE OHIO 45433-5001

SPECIAL ORDER 1 December 1993
GS-74

The 650th Services Squadron is activated at Edwards AFB, California, and assigned to 650th Air Base Wing, on 1 January 1994. Authority: DAF/PE letter 419r, 16 November 1993, Activation of the 650th Services Squadron, and AFI 38-101.

FOR THE COMMANDER

Figure 6.5. Sample Special Order--Activate.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS AIR FORCE SPACE COMMAND
PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE COLORADO 80914-5001

SPECIAL ORDER 1 March 1994
GS-24

The 50th Satellite Communications Squadron, Falcon AFB, Colorado, is redesignated as the 50th Space Communications Squadron on 6 July 1994 and remains assigned to the 50th Operations Group. Authority: DAF/PE letter 347r, 30 January 1994, Organization Actions Affecting Certain Air Force Space Command Units, and AFI 38-101.

FOR THE COMMANDER

Figure 6.6. Sample Special Order--Redesignate.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE

HEADQUARTERS AIR EDUCATION AND TRAINING COMMAND
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE TEXAS 78150-5001

SPECIAL ORDER 6 January 1994
GS-7

The 82nd Security Police Squadron at Randolph AFB, Texas, will be inactivated on 1 April 1994. Concurrently, unit designation will revert to the control of the Department of the Air Force. The Director of Personnel, HQ AETC, will reassign personnel. Upon inactivation, consult AFI 84-101 to dispose of flags and other historic artifacts. Dispose of supplies and equipment per current directives. Dispose of organizational records and submit a final report under the current directives. Authority: DAF/PE letter 409r, 8 December 1993, Organization Actions Affecting Certain Air Education and Training Command Units, and AFI 38-101.

FOR THE COMMANDER

Figure 6.7. Sample Special Order--Inactivate.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE

HEADQUARTERS AIR MOBILITY COMMAND
SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE ILLINOIS 62225-5363

SPECIAL ORDER 5 December 1992
GS-8

The 55th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron, McClellan AFB, California, is relieved from its present assignment to Air Rescue Service and is assigned to the 60th Operations Group, on 1 January 1993. Authority: AFI 38-101.

FOR THE COMMANDER

Figure 6.8. Sample Special Order--Reassign.

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
HEADQUARTERS AIR MOBILITY COMMAND
SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE ILLINOIS 62225-5363

SPECIAL ORDER 23 November 1992
GS-12

The following units will be designated and activated as provisional units at Cairo West, Egypt (APO AE 09867) on 23 December 1992. Units are assigned and attached as indicated. The 1610 ALSG will be under the operational control of Air Mobility Command. Authority: AFI 38-101.

Unit Assigned To Attached To

HQ 1610 Airlift Support Group (ALSG) 21 Air Force
1610 Operations Support Squadron (OSS) 1610 ALSG
1610 Logistics Support Squadron (LSS) 1610 ALSG
1610 Mission Support Squadron (MSSQ) 1610 ALSG

FOR THE COMMANDER

Figure 6.9. Sample Special Order--Attach.

Chapter 7

AIR FORCE ORGANIZATIONAL PLANNING DOCUMENT

7.1. Introduction. Air Force organization is based on a comprehensive plan that integrates force structure, manpower, and Air Force installations. The Air Force Organizational Planning Document (AFOPD) lays out the CSAF-approved blueprint for the objective Air Force. It is both a quick reference source and a planning tool that enables decision makers at any level to review and project a unit's organizational structure, weapons systems, associated manpower, and unit emblems. The AFOPD consists of organizational charts with approved unit patches (figure 7.1) and associated data tables that show end strength and major force structure (table 7.1). All levels of Air Force organizations, from HQ USAF to base level units are included. Organizational units not depicted in the AFOPD are not authorized unless a specific exception is approved by CSAF. Any such exceptions will be reflected in subsequent editions of the AFOPD.

22 Air Refueling Wing

(Host Wing at McConnell AFB)


Figure 7.1. Sample AFOPD Organization Chart.
. Table 7.1. Sample AFOPD Manpower Data Table.

 
 
 
Organization

Weapon Systems

 
 
 
 
Manpower
 
 
 
 
 
 

McConnell AFB KS

 
 
 
 
 
FY
 
FY 94/4
 
 
 
FY 95/4
 
 
 

CMD

 
 
 
AV ID
94/4
95/4
99/4
Officer
Enlisted
Civilian
Total
Officer
Enlisted
Civilian
Total
 

HOST WING

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AMC
 
22 Air Refueling Wg
 
 
 
 

382

2354

351

3087

383

2247

353

2983

 
 
 

344 Air Refueling Sq

KC-135

99

99

99

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

349 Air Refueling Sq

KC-135

99

99

99

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

350 Air Refueling Sq

KC-135

99

99

99

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

384 Air Refueling Sq

C-12

99

99

99

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

KC-135

99

99

99

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Off Base Units

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OL-A, 22 Logistics Gp (Tinker AFB OK)
 
 
 
 

1

8

0

9

 
 
 
 
 

WING TOTAL

 
 
 
 
 

383

2362

351

3096

383

2247

353

2983

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

TENANT UNITS

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ACC
 
384 Bomb Gp
 
 
 
 

137

954

9

1100

 
 
 
 

ACC

 
384 Support Sq
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

7

124

0

131

ACC

 
OL, ACC Maintenance Support Office
 
 
 
 

0

0

3

3

 
 
 
 

ACC

 
OL, 608 Air Operations Gp
 
 
 
 

1

2

0

3

1

2

0

3

AETC

 
OL, Det 5, Civil Air Patrol
 
 
 
 

1

1

0

2

1

1

0

2

AETC

 
Det 401, 372 Training Sq
 
 
 
 

0

10

0

10

0

10

0

10

AETC

 
OL, 619 Training Support Sq
 
 
 
 

7

0

0

7

7

0

0

7

AFAA

 
Det 246, AF Audit Agency
 
 
 
 

0

0

7

7

0

0

7

7

AFELM

 
Defense Commissary Agency
 
 
 
 

0

10

0

10

0

10

0

10

AFELM

 
Defense Finance and Accounting Service
 
 
 
 

0

10

0

10

0

10

0

10

AFELM

 
Health Facilities Office, Central Region
 
 
 
 

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

AFLSA

 
OL, AF Legal Services Agency
 
 
 
 

1

1

0

2

1

1

0

2

AFOSI

 
Det 321, 3 Field Investigations Region
 
 
 
 

1

4

1

6

1

3

1

5

AFOTEC

 
OL, AF Operational Test and Evaluation Ctr
 
 
 
 

5

0

0

5

5

0

0

5

ANG

 
184 Bomber Gp C-12

99

99

99

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

AFRES

 
921 Civil Engineer Sq
 
 
 
 

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

1

AFRES

 
OL, 951 Reserve Recruiting Sq
 
 
 
 

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

 

TENANT TOTAL

 
 
 
 
 

154

993

21

1168

24

162

9

195

7.2. Publication Authority. CSAF approves the AFOPD for publication. HQ USAF/PEO is responsible for compiling and publishing the AFOPD. The document will be updated and published in July and February of each year following the Program Objective Memorandum (POM) and President's Budget (PB) cycles. Each succeeding version will be used as a planning tool for the next Future Year Defense Plan (FYDP) exercise. MAJCOMs will submit proposed baseline data changes to HQ USAF/PEO no later then 30 days before publication. Submissions should reflect program change requests (PCR), changes in mission, and base closures and realignments. Actions in the Schedule of Changes (SOC) will be updated when the SOC is received. Baseline data changes should include fluctuations in unit manpower authorizations, status of detachments or OLs, and any changes to the organizations' structures.

7.3. Contents. The AFOPD depicts the entire Air Force organizational structure from HQ Air Force and FOAs down through MAJCOM, NAF, wing, and base level units, including tenants. The first part lists every Air Force unit by type (e.g., wings) and provides summary data on organizations (e.g., a list of heritage bearing squadrons). The second part includes an appendix for HQ USAF, each MAJCOM, Air Force Reserve (AFRES), and Air National Guard (ANG).

7.3.1. Each appendix includes:

7.3.1.1 Organization charts for every organization down to the squadron level, as projected in the last year of the FYDP. Color reproductions of CSAF approved patches for heritage bearing units.

7.3.1.2. Data tables summarizing the unit manpower and Primary Aerospace-Vehicle Authorized (PAA). Summarized manpower data (e.g., wing manpower rolled into a wing total and depicted for the current and next year of the FYDP). Tenant unit manpower data, categorized by reporting chain, and included in the host unit data table. Unit PAA categorized by number and type of weapon system and displayed for the current, next, and last year of the FYDP.

7.4. Heraldry. The AFOPD depicts the official emblems for the MAJCOMs, NAFs, wings, and operational squadrons according to AFI 84-101. The Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) will provide color copies of approved emblems for Air Force Graphics to use in producing digitized formatted copies for inclusion in the AFOPD.

7.5. Distribution. AFOPDs will be distributed to major HQ USAF organizations (including AFHRA), MAJCOMs, centers, NAFs, wings, and independent groups. Additional distribution to subordinate units is authorized.

MERRILL A. McPEAK, General, USAF
Chief of Staff

GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES, ABBREVIATIONS, AND ACRONYMS

Section A--References

AFPD 38-1, Organization

AFI 16-403, Program Management of Installations and Units Data and Movement of Units

AFI 38-201, Determining Manpower Requirements (formerly AFR 26-1, Volume 3)

AFI 51-604, Appointment to and Assumption of Command

AFI 84-101, Historical Products, Services, and Requirements

Section B--Abbreviations and Acronyms

Abbreviations
and Acronyms Definitions

ACC Air Combat Command
AFOPD Air Force Organizational Planning Document

AFRES Air Force Reserve

AGE Aerospace Ground Equipment

APF Appropriated Funds

ANG Air National Guard

C3 Command, Control, and Communications

DRU Direct Reporting Unit

FOA Field Operating Agency

FYDP Future Year Defense Plan

HQ USAF Headquarters US Air Force

MAJCOM Major Command

MWRS Morale, Welfare, Recreation and Services

NAF Numbered Air Force

NDI Nondestructive Inspection

OL Operating Location

OPlan Operations Plan

PACAF Pacific Air Forces

PCR Program Change Request

PME Professional Military Education

POM Program Objective Memorandum

RRRP Resource, Recovery, and Recycling Program

SOC Schedule of Changes

TMDE Test Measurement Diagnostics Equipment

USAFE United States Air Forces Europe

UCMJ Uniform Code of Military Justice

WRM War Reserve Materiel