US Space Command

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UR10-5
Headquarters United States Space Command 31 January 1995
Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado 80914-3040

Operations

SPACE SURVEILLANCE NETWORK USER SUPPORT DATA

This regulation identifies the Space Surveillance Network (SSN) resources, organizational responsibilities, and SSN data products. In addition, it tells how to request SSN data and establishes a method of data distribution. It applies to HQ United States Space Command (USSPACECOM); Air Force Space Command (AFSPC); Naval Space Command (NAVSPACECOM); Army Space Command (ARSPACE); the Space Control Center (SCC), the Alternate SCC (ASCC), and the Space Surveillance Network (SSN).

SUMMARY OF REVISIONS
This revision combined SPADOC and SSC references into the new Space Control Center (SCC), changed references of the SPADOC computer system to the 4C computer system, updated office symbols, reorganized the document to clearly defined SSN products, deleted attachments 1 and 4, and replaced attachment 3.
Paragraph Page
Chapter 1 - Introduction
General 1.1 2
SSN Resources 1.2 2
Responsibilities 1.3 3
Explanation of Terms 1.4 4

Chapter 2 - SSN Data Products
General 2.1 6
Boxscore 2.2 6
Decay Prediction 2.3 7
Double Precision Position and Velocity Vectors 2.4 8
Ephemeris Generation 2.5 8
Historic Data System (HDS) 2.6 10
Predictive Avoidance 2.7 11
Satellite Catalog 2.8 13
SATRAK Program 2.9 14
State Vectors 2.10 14
Two-Card Element Set 2.11 15
Other SSN Data Products 2.12 15

Chapter 3 - Data Request Procedures
General 3.1 16
Technical Coordination 3.2 16
Points of Contact 3.3 16
Requestor Documentation 3.4 16
Request Priorities 3.5 16
Data Review 3.6 16
_______________
Supersedes: UR55-6, 15 April 1991.
No. of Printed Pages: 25
OPR: SPJ33OC (Capt Scott Konnath)
Approved by: Colonel Gary W. Dahlen
Distribution: FX (See page 20)

Data Termination 3.7 16
System Effectiveness Evaluation 3.8 16
Specific Information for Analyst Satellite Data Requests 3.9 16
Outside Agency Requests 3.10 16
National Agency Requests 3.11 16
Contractor Requests 3.12 16
Foreign and Commercial Requests 3.13 17

Chapter 4 - Data Distribution Methods
General 4.1 18
Electronic Message Transfer 4.2 18
Postal Transfer 4.3 19
Telephonic Transfer 4.4 19

Attachments
1. How to Fill Out an Orbital Data Request (USSPACECOM Form 1) 21
2. How to Prepare an R-15 Message 22
3. Orbital Mechanics References 25

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

1.1.General. The Space Surveillance Network (SSN) is under the operational control of Commander in Chief United States Space Command (USCINCSPACE). The SSN gives United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) the capability to detect, track, identify, and catalog all man-made earth orbiting objects or satellites.

1.2. SSN Resources. The SSN consists of the Space Control Center (SCC), the Alternate Space Control Center (ASCC), the 1st Command and Control Squadron, and various radar and optical satellite tracking sensors.

1.2.1. Space Control Center (SCC). The SCC is the central command, control, and communications interface for space defense operations. The SCC provides operational command and control of the SSN. In addition, it provides space support operations where required (such as maintaining the satellite catalog).

1.2.2. Alternate Space Control Center (ASCC). The ASCC is a part of Naval Space Command (NAVSPACECOM) in Dahlgren, Virginia. The ASCC performs the same functions as the SCC, but in a less robust mode. The ASCC is activated to maintain the satellite catalog when computational and/or command and control capabilities of the SCC are limited. The Commanding Officer, NAVSPACECOM, approves unilateral Navy Departmental requests in support of the Joint Chiefs of Staff directed-United States Space Command missions and others as directed by the Chief of Naval Operations, or higher authority.

1.2.3. 1st Command and Control Squadron (1CACS). 1CACS is a part of Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and is collocated with the SCC. 1CACS performs all routine processing for the SCC.

1.2.4. Sensors:

1.2.4.1. Dedicated Sensors. A USSPACECOM operationally assigned sensor with a primary mission of SSN support:

MOTIF, Hawaii (electro-optical)

NAVSPASUR, Virginia (radiometric interferometer)
GEODSS Site 1, New Mexico (electro-optical)
GEODSS Site 3, Hawaii (electro-optical)
GEODSS Site 4, Diego Garcia (electro-optical)
Eglin Air Force Base, Florida (phased array radar)
Kaena Point, Hawaii (mechanical tracker)
DSTS Site 1, New York (RF Passive)
DSTS Site 2, England (RF Passive)
DSTS Site 3, Japan (RF Passive)

1.2.4.2. Collateral Sensors. A USSPACECOM operationally assigned sensor with a primary mission other than SSN support:

Thule Air Base, Greenland (phased array radar)
Clear Air Station, Alaska (detection and tracking radars)
Fylingdales, England (phased array radar)
Pirinclik Air Station, Turkey (detection and tracking radars)
Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts (phased array radar)
Beale Air Force Base, California (phased array radar)
Eldorado Air Station, Texas (phased array radar)
Robins Air Force Base, Georgia (phased array radar)
Ascension Island (mechanical tracker)
Antigua (mechanical tracker)

1.2.4.3. Contributing Sensors.A non-USSPACECOM operationally assigned sensor with a primary mission other than SSN support under contact or agreement to support the SSN:

ALTAIR, Kwajalein (mechanical tracker)
ALCOR, Kwajalein (wideband imaging)
Millstone Hill, Massachusetts (mechanical tracker)
Haystack, Massachusetts (wideband imaging)
AMOS, Hawaii (electro-optical)

1.3. Responsibilities:

1.3.1. HQ USSPACECOM Center for Aerospace Analysis (AN). AN provides analytical and scientific support to USSPACECOM.

1.3.2. HQ USSPACECOM Director of Intelligence (J2). J2 approves the public release of any SSN Mission Payload Assessment (MPA) data (formerly Space Object Identification (SOI) data).

1.3.3. HQ USSPACECOM Director of Operations (J3). J3 approves the public release of any SSN data.

1.3.4. HQ USSPACECOM Deputy Director forCurrent Operations (J33). J33 reviews and updates letters and memorandums of agreement between the SSN and other agencies.

1.3.5. HQ USSPACECOM Directorate of Public Affairs (PA). PA coordinates with the HQ USSPACECOM, Director of Operations (J3) or Director of Intelligence (J2), prior to public release of any SSN data. PA may release SSN data using a "Response to Query" form approved by HQ USSPACECOM Director of Operations (J3). PA develops internal procedures for control of approved requests.

1.3.6. Cheyenne Mountain Operations Centers (CMOC) Combat Centers Division (JCCD). JCCD is the office of primary responsibility for SSN user support and is the executive agent for all SSN data requests. JCCD monitors, validates, controls, and processes all SSN data requests from outside agencies. JCCD will also revalidate user need for SSN data every 12 months from the date of request, approve and disapprove all user SSN data requests, and send approved requests to proper agency for action. In addition, JCCD will verify that requests are completed and maintain a file of the approved requests. Finally, JCCD will compile and maintain an annual record of all cataloged data requests to include; one-time agent, continuing, and special requests.

1.3.7. Space Control Center (SCC). SCC may accept responsibility for processing real-time data requests with resources available to the duty crew. SCC may request assistance from CMOC/JCCD. However, the request for assistance does not relieve the SCC of follow-up action. It only provides additional resources for servicing the data request.

Note: CMOC/JCCDO processes a crew support request as a data request.

1.3.8. Alternate Space Control Center (ASCC). ASCC may accept responsibility for processing real-time data requests with resources available to NAVSPACECOM. ASSC approves or disapproves all Navy Department requests and provides CMOC/JCCD with an information copy of the request. ASCC will process SSN support requests sent by CMOC/JCCDO and will forward non-Navy Department requests for SSN data to CMOC/JCCDO. In addition, ASCC will maintain control over NAVSPACECOM tasks. Upon termination of an activation period, ASCC may transfer a real-time data request to SCC. However, this does not relieve the ASCC of responsibility for follow-up action to ensure that the request is complete.

1.3.9. 1st Command and Control Squadron (1CACS). 1CACS monitors, validates, controls, and processes SSN data requests from outside agencies. 1CACS will also revalidate user need for SSN data every 12 months from the date of request.

1.4. Explanation of Terms:

1.4.1. Cataloged Satellite. All satellites are given a unique SCC number when they are cataloged. Cataloged satellites include all SCC numbers between 1 and 69999.

1.4.2. Analyst Satellite. 8xxxx series SCC numbers. Analyst satellites are objects that are not part of the SCC satellite catalog but are used for analysis purposes. A large portion of the 8xxxx series is used wholly for technical analysis. However, a subset of the 8xxxx series are actual satellites that are maintained either by the ASCC or by CMOC Space Operations Orbital Analysis Section Special Operations Branch (JCCDXA).

1.4.3. Operations Activity Request. Outputs that the SCC or ASCC duty crew can produce. This is a real-time response necessary to support a user's mission. These requests are not processed as data requests. Real-time requests for analyst satellite data is restricted to specific sensors and specific DOD/government agencies.

1.4.4. Orbital Theory Background. The orbital analysts in the SCC have three primary mathematical ephemeris models that can be used to generate various orbital products. The sections that follow provide a top level description of these models.

1.4.4.1. General Perturbations (GP). (Analytical integration) This model is commonly referred to as SGP4/DP4. SGP4/DP4 stands for Simplified General Perturbations Program No. 4 which includes the Deep Space portion (DP4). DP4 is automatically invoked for satellites having an orbital period greater than or equal to 225 minutes. This model and the Simplified General Perturbation (SGP) model are used mostly by the SCC and the scientific community. The mathematics for this theory are described in the reference listed in attachment 3. The GP model used by the ASCC is commonly referred to as PPT3. PPT3 stands for Position and Partials as functions of Time version 3.

1.4.4.2. Special Perturbations (SP). (Numerical integration) This model is commonly referred to as SPEPH. SPEPH stands for Special Perturbation Ephemeris. This model is far more complex than the GP models. The model offers a wider choice of options such as the gravity model (6th, 8th, 12th order, etc.), dynamic atmosphere, and it has a more detailed model of the lunar and solar forces. This model does not lend itself well to external use as there is no way to let the user know just which options were used in the DC process and it is essential that the same model be used for subsequent position predictions. This model is used mostly for internal high priority mission support. The mathematics for this theory are described in the reference listed in attachment 3.

1.4.4.3. Semi-Analytic (SA). (Hybrid analytic/numeric integration) This model is commonly referred to as SALT. SALT stands for the Semi-Analytic Liu Theory. This model has been implemented into the operational system; however, use has been limited to date. It is anticipated that this model will gain more use as it produces a state vector that approaches the accuracy of the SP models with the computational efficiency of the GP models. The mathematics for this theory will be included in a future revision of the reference listed in attachment 3. Technical documentation and assistance is available by contacting the references identified in attachment 3.

1.4.5. Orbital Product Interchange Background. For optimum performance it is essential to use the two card element set or the state vector together with the same theory that was used to generate the data. There is a transformation/conversion method used to convert one type data into the other but it is not advisable to use the results for accurate orbit prediction purposes. The resultant transformation/conversion product is typically used only to get a differential correction process started.

1.4.6. Relative Orbital Accuracy. There are many things that affect the accuracy of the two card mean orbital elements and the osculating state vectors. The accuracy of the orbit parameters as determined by a mathematical data fitting process is dependent upon; the orbital characteristics, the satellite physical characteristics, atmospheric variations, solar activity, the amount and quality of observational data used, and to some degree the ephemeris model selected. Therefore, the accuracy of any predicted position of a satellite will also be affected by these factors as well as the length of time from the epoch of the orbital data used. For a full investigation of the mathematics behind the SCC products and processes, readers are referred to the references listed in attachment 3.

1.4.7. Errors. It is important to understand that there are many factors that effect the quality of the orbital element sets and/or state vectors produced by the SCC. The various types of errors have been addressed, studied, analyzed, and algorithms or processing techniques have been developed to compensate for the error to the extent possible. The sections that follow provide a brief synopsis of these errors and what they generally mean to the user.

1.4.7.1. Systematic Errors. Each sensor in the space surveillance network produces observations of different accuracy. Even among like systems of sensors such as Pave Paws radars where the data gathered on the same satellite with similar viewing geometry, there tends to be slightly different accuracies in the observational data. The SCC command and control system has been designed to minimize the effect of all types of errors. Various means of identifying and compensating for errors are available to the crew orbital analysts. These errors are transparent to the user.

1.4.7.2. Mathematical Model Errors. There are mathematical model errors but they are typically small. The General Perturbations (GP) ephemeris model was designed to meet the operational requirements of accuracy and computational speed. This is the model used for producing and maintaining the entire space catalog. GP two card element sets are typically "good" to the order of a few to several kilometers at epoch. When used to predict 24 hours into the future, GP produces answers that are typically "good" to the order of tens of kilometers to occasionally 100 kilometers. The Special Perturbations (SP) ephemeris models were developed to use a wider choice of gravity models, atmosphere models, and other perturbative forces in order to provide the best possible predictions of future positions and velocities. These models are computationally intensive and are used mostly for special tasks such as Tracking and Impact Predictions (TIP) and special interest satellites including very close approaches between satellites. The state vectors produced are typically "good" to the order of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers at epoch. When used to predict 24 hours into the future, SP produces answers that are typically "good" to the order of several to tens of kilometers.

1.4.7.3. Process Errors -Differential Correction Process Errors. The SCC command and control system uses both manual and automatic Differential Correction (DC) processes. The automatic DC uses built in data editing and convergence criteria that has been developed, enhanced, and modified over the last 30 years. In effect this is a type of an Expert System. For the vast majority of cases this method minimizes errors. This is the process that is used to maintain almost all of the orbits for the SCC space catalog. The manual system allows the orbital analyst a full range of options to edit the contribution of the observational data used in the update of each orbital parameter and can control the DC process in many ways. This process is normally used only by the most experienced orbital analysts. This method is usually selected to work on very troublesome satellites such as cases where there is very little data or something is happening that makes it difficult to maintain the orbital parameters. The orbital analyst usually is able to get the best possible orbit determined. The errors can vary from very small to modest. In those situations where the error is higher than desired, it is usually the best that can be done with the data and circumstances present. Orbital Analyst induced errors are rare but can occur.

Chapter 2

SSN PRODUCTS

2.1. General. The following is a list of the products available from the SSN.

2.2. Boxscore. A Boxscore contains a list of satellites launched by each country or launching agency to include payloads, rocketbodies, platforms, and debris. A Boxscore also contains total objects in orbit, total space probes, and total objects decayed.

2.2.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Boxscore Date/Time (From-To) N/A
Country

2.2.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
Part A.Current Catalog Summary:
Country N/A
Orbit Type:
Earth Orbiting Space Vehicles (ESV)
Space Probes (SP) N/A
Total ESV Payloads N/A
Total ESV Rocket Bodies (R/B) N/A
Total ESV Platforms (PLT) N/A
Total ESV Debris (DEB) N/A
Total ESV Unknown (UNK) N/A
Overall Total of ESV Objects N/A
Total SP Payloads N/A
Total SP R/B N/A
Total SP PLT N/A
Total SP DEB N/A
Total SP UNK N/A
Overall Total of SP Objects N/A
Overall Total of All Payloads N/A
Field Name: Units of Measure:
Overall Total of All R/B N/A
Overall Total of All PLT N/A
Overall Total of All DEB N/A
Overall Total of All UNK N/A

Part B. Decayed Catalog Summary:
Country N/A
Orbit Type:
Earth Orbiting Space Vehicles (ESV)
Space Probes (SP) N/A
Total ESV Payloads N/A
Total ESV Rocket Bodies (R/B) N/A
Total ESV Platforms (PLT) N/A
Total ESV Debris (DEB) N/A
Total ESV Unknown (UNK) N/A
Overall Total of ESV Objects N/A
Total SP Payloads N/A
Total SP R/B N/A
Total SP PLT N/A
Total SP DEB N/A
Total SP UNK N/A
Overall Total of SP Objects N/A
Overall Total of All Payloads N/A
Overall Total of All R/B N/A
Overall Total of All PLT N/A
Overall Total of All DEB N/A
Overall Total of All UNK N/A

Part C. Satellites Cataloged (Note: This is a report of satellites cataloged since the last boxscore message.):
Satellite Number N/A
International Designator N/A
Country N/A
Object Type N/A
Common Name N/A
Launch Date N/A

Part D. Satellites Decayed (Note: This is a report of all satellites that have decayed since the last boxscore message.):
Satellite Number N/A
International Designator N/A
Country N/A
Object Type N/A
Common Name N/A
Decay Date N/A

2.3. Decay Prediction. A Decay Predication contains a list of satellites (TIP or Normal: TIP = radar cross-section greater than one square meter and Normal = radar cross-section less than one square meter) with their expected Julian date of decay 60 days into the future. The long-term decay predictions are calculated using GP theory.

2.3.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
None N/A

2.3.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
Common Name N/A
International Designator N/A
Satellite Number N/A
Decay Date N/A
Decay Type N/A

2.4. Double Precision Position and Velocity Vectors. A Double Precision Position and Velocity Vector contains position information for a satellite using SP theory.

2.4.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Satellite Number N/A

2.4.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
Satellite Number N/A
Revolution Number N/A
Epoch N/A
X Position Component Kilometers
Y Position Component Kilometers
Z Position Component Kilometers
XDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
YDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
ZDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
Bterm Meters2/Kilogram
AGOM Meters2/Kilogram

2.5. Ephemeris Generation. An Ephemeris contains position information for specified space objects (by either general perturbations or special perturbations computations).

2.5.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Satellite number Prediction Theory (GP/SP)
Start Time Time Format:
Stop Time YYMMDDHHMMSS.SSS
Time Step YY MMDDHHMM.MMM
Coordinate System: YYDDDHHMMSS.SSS (Default)
Earth Centered Inertial (ECI) YYDDD.DDDDDDDD
Geocentric Polar Spherical (GPS) DDHHMMSS.SSS (From interval
Earth Fixed Greenwich (EFG) start time.)
Output Orbital Elements? (Y/N) DDHHMM.MMM
Output Satellite Ephemeris? (Y/N) Distance/Velocity Format:
Output Ground Trace? (Y/N) Earth Radii/KEMIN
Output Error Ellipsoid? (Y/N) Nautical Miles/Second
Output Format: Statute Miles/Second
Text Kilometers/Second (Default)
Plot Feet/Second
Both Nautical Miles/Hour
Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Statute Miles/Hour
Kilometers/Hour
Astronomical Units/Day
Angular Format:
Degrees (Default)
Radians
Revolutions

2.5.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
General:
Date/Time N/A
Satellite Number N/A
Elset Number N/A
Revolution Number N/A
Ephemeris Type N/A
Geodetic Latitude (LAT) Degrees
East Longitude (LONG (E)) Degrees
Altitude (HEIGHT) Kilometers
Ground Speed (VEL) Kilometers/Second
Heading (AZ) Degrees
Flight Path Angle (GAM) Degrees
Orbital Elements:
Semi-Major Axis (A) Kilometers
Eccentricity (E) Degrees
Inclination (I) Degrees
Right Ascension of Ascending Node Degrees
Argument of Perigee Degrees
True Argument of Latitude Degrees

Satellite Ephemeris:
ECI/EFG:
X Position Component Kilometers
Y Position Component Kilometers
Z Position Component Kilometers
XDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
YDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
ZDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second

GPS:
ALPHA (Right Ascension) Degrees
DELTA (Declination) Degrees
BETA Degrees
AZ (Azimuth) Degrees
RAD (Position Vector Magnitude) Kilometers
VEL (Velocity Vector Magnitude) Kilometers/Second

Error Ellipsoid:
Semi-Axis Magnitudes Kilometers
Spherical Error--95 Percent N/A
(Characteristic Vectors)
U Largest (U Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the largest semi-axis.) N/A

Field Name: Units of Measure:
U Smallest (U Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the smallest semi-axis.) N/A
U Autre (U Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the autre semi-axis.) N/A
V Largest (V Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the largest semi-axis.) N/A
V Smallest (V Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the smallest semi-axis.) N/A
V Autre (V Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the autre semi-axis.) N/A
W Largest (W Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the largest semi-axis.) N/A
W Smallest (W Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the smallest semi-axis.) N/A
W Autre (W Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the autre semi-axis.) N/A

(Position Variances-Covariances)
SIGMA U,U N/A
SIGMA U,V N/A
SIGMA U,W N/A
SIGMA V,U N/A
SIGMA V,V N/A
SIGMA V,W N/A
SIGMA W,U N/A
SIGMA W,V N/A
SIGMA W,W N/A

2.6. Historical Data System (HDS). The HDS contains historical satellite information derived from the SSN. The Office of Primary Responsibility (OPR) for HDS is AFSPC SWSC/RMOF. Requests for HDS satellite elements sets or satellite observations will only include data on cataloged satellites.

2.6.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Two-Card Element Sets: Two-Card Element Sets:
Satellite Number Closest to Date (the element set
Date or Time Span closest to a given date on either
Element Set Number side for 30 days)
Closest Before Date (the element
set closest to but before that date
at 2400 hours)
Closest After Date (the element set
closest to but after the stated date
at 0001 hours)

Observations: Observations:
Satellite Number By Sensor
Date or Time Span By Elevation
By Declination
By Right Ascension
By Azimuth

2.6.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
Two-Card Element Sets:
(See paragraph 2.12.) N/A

Observations:
(Dependent on observation type
and sensor.) N/A

2.7. Predictive Avoidance. Predictive Avoidance contains a list of time periods (windows) during which any number of specified secondary satellites and/or the earth will pass near a line of sight between a sensor and a designated primary satellite over a specified time span. The sensor may be located at a fixed station on the earth's surface, on a vessel (ship or aircraft), on a missile or satellite. The target may be a satellite, missile, vessel, fixed station, or a fixed point in inertial space (star). This information is primarily used for the Laser Clearinghouse Program.

2.7.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Start Time Cone Half-Angle
Stop Time Minimum Dwell Time
Source Data: Maximum Effective Range
Earth-Fixed Site Number In-Track Timing Uncertainty
Satellite Number Beam Half-Angle & LOS Uncertainty
Prediction Theory Type Victim Data:
Target Data: Earth is Victim?
Earth-Fixed Site Number Satellite Category
Satellite Number (Friendly, Enemy, or both)
Prediction Theory Type Object Type
(Payloads, Rocketbodies, Debris, etc.)
Specific Satellite Numbers
Source Earth-Fixed Data:
Geodetic Latitude (N/S)
Geodetic East Longitude
Height
Source Vessel Data:
Time
Geodetic Latitude (N/S)
Geodetic East Longitude
Altitude
Heading
Speed
Source Missile Data:
Epoch Time or Launch Time
Input Theory Type
Prediction Theory Type (Salt,SP)
Coordinate System (ECI,LCEF)
X-Position
Y-Position
Z-Position
X-Velocity
Y-Velocity
Z-Velocity
Drag Parameter/Ballistic Coefficient
NDOT/2
NDOT/6
BSTAR
Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
B
Hot Force Model
LCEF Requires Next 5 Fields:
Launch Pad Latitude
Launch Pad East Longitude
Launch Pad Height
True Azimuth
Time From Launch
Target Celestial Input Data:
Star Number
Target Celestial Body Data:
Right Ascension
Declination
Star Chart Date
Target Celestial Body Name:

(If used, both of the following must be entered.)
Sun, Moon, Planet Input
Sun/Moon (JPL,Analytic)
Beam Constant AZ-EL Data: (If used, both of the following must be entered.)
Azimuth
Elevation
Target Earth-Fixed Data:
Geodetic Latitude (N/S)
Geodetic East Longitude
Height
Target Vessel Data:
Time
Geodetic Latitude (N/S)
Geodetic East Longitude
Altitude
Heading
Speed
Target Missile Data:
Epoch Time or Launch Time
Input Theory Type
Prediction Theory Type (Salt,SP)
Coordinate System (ECI,LCEF)
X-Position
Y-Position
Z-Position
X-Velocity
Y-Velocity
Z-Velocity
Drag Parameter/Ballistic Coefficient
NDOT/2
NDOT/6
BSTAR
B
Hot Force Model
LCEF Requires Next 5 Fields:
Launch Pad Latitude
Launch Pad East Longitude
Launch Pad Height
True Azimuth
Time From Launch
2.7.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
DE Target Type: N/A
Fixed Ground Target Name N/A
Position: N/A
Latitude (N/S) Degrees
East Longitude Degrees
Vessel Target Type: N/A
Position: N/A
Latitude (N/S) Degrees
East Longitude Degrees
Heading Degrees
Speed Knots
Missile Target Type N/A
Satellite Target Number N/A
Star Target Number N/A
Fixed Boresight: N/A
Azimuth Degrees
Elevation Degrees
Period of Interest N/A
Safe Irradiation Times for Emitter: N/A
Start Time N/A
Stop Time N/A
Wait Time N/A
Remarks N/A

2.8. Satellite Catalog. The Satellite Catalog contains a list of information for cataloged and decayed satellites maintained by the SCC which includes initial, current, or final orbital elements (if available).

2.8.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
None N/A

2.8.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
International Designator N/A
Satellite Number N/A
Common Name N/A
Owner Source N/A
Launch Date N/A
Launch Site N/A
Decay Date N/A
Period Minutes
Inclination Degrees
Apogee Kilometers
Perigee Kilometers
Element Code N/A
RCS Value Meters2
RCS Type Indicator N/A

Note: The format of the catalog is subject to change in the future. For satellites with no available element sets, a comment will indicate whether the satellites are in lunar orbit, Mars orbit or that current element sets are not maintained on the satellites.

2.9. SATRAK Program. SATRAK is a personal computer software package capable of performing a variety of space related analysis. The program is capable of generating ground site look angles and ground traces of earth orbiting satellites. This program is only compatible with MS-DOS microcomputers. Distribution of this program is provided by HQ USSPACECOM Center for Aerospace Analysis (AN).

2.10. State Vectors. A State Vector contains position information for a satellite using SP theory. This product is associated with a requirement for better accuracies associated with special projects and tasks such as Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP), selected Computation Miss Between Orbit (COMBO) tasks, and similar tasks.

2.10.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Satellite Number N/A

2.10.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
Satellite Number N/A
Element Set Number N/A
Epoch N/A
Ballistic Coefficient Meters2/Kilogram
Time of Point N/A
Revolution Number N/A
X Position Component Kilometers
Y Position Component Kilometers
Z Position Component Kilometers
XDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
YDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
ZDOT Velocity Component Kilometers/Second
Geodetic Latitude (PHI) Degrees
Geodetic East Longitude (LAM) Degrees
Geodetic Height (H) Kilometers
Magnitude of Velocity Vector (VEL) Kilometers/Second
Azimuth of Velocity (AZ) Degrees
Angle Velocity Makes
w/Local Horizon (GAM) Degrees
Semi-Axis Magnitudes Kilometers
Spherical Error--95 Percent N/A

(Characteristic Vectors)
U Largest (U Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the largest semi-axis.) N/A
U Smallest (U Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the smallest semi-axis.) N/A
U Autre (U Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the autre semi-axis.) N/A
V Largest (V Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the largest semi-axis.) N/A
V Smallest (V Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the smallest semi-axis.) N/A
V Autre (V Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the autre semi-axis.) N/A
Field Name: Units of Measure:
W Largest (W Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the largest semi-axis.) N/A
W Smallest (W Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the smallest semi-axis.) N/A
W Autre (W Component of Unit Vector-
in the direction of the autre semi-axis.) N/A

(Position Variances-Covariances)
SIGMA U,U N/A
SIGMA U,V N/A
SIGMA U,W N/A
SIGMA V,U N/A
SIGMA V,V N/A
SIGMA V,W N/A
SIGMA W,U N/A
SIGMA W,V N/A
SIGMA W,W N/A

2.11. Two-Card Element Set. A Two-Card Element Set contains position information for a satellite using GP theory. The mean motion parameter has been modified (commonly referred to as Kozai'd) to be astrodynamically compatible with Simplified General Perturbations (SGP) model. For users wanting to use SGP4/DP4, a very slight modification is required to un-Kozai the mean motion back to its original Brouwer form.

2.11.1. Inputs:

Required Inputs: Optional Inputs:
Satellite Number N/A
Theory Type (SPG,SGP4/DP4)

2.11.2. Outputs:

Field Name: Units of Measure:
Satellite Number N/A
International Designator N/A
Epoch N/A
First Derivative of Mean Motion Revolutions/day2
Second Derivative of Mean Motion Revolutions/day3
Bstar Drag Term N/A
Ephemeris Type N/A
Element Set Number N/A
Inclination Degrees
Right Ascension of the Ascending Node Degrees
Eccentricity N/A
Argument of Perigee Degrees
Mean Anomaly Degrees
Mean Motion Revolutions/day
Revolution Number at Epoch N/A

2.12. Other SSN Data Products. SSN data products not listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis (i.e. Position Situation Report and Volume Penetration Report).

Chapter 3

DATA REQUEST PROCEDURES

3.1. General. SSN data is available to United States military agencies, Federal Government agencies, and civilian contractors in support of Department of Defense (DOD) contracts and Federal Government Agency contracts. Other agencies, individuals, or foreign governments request data through National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This chapter explains how to request SSN data.

3.2. Technical Coordination. Coordinate data requests with CMOC/JCCD to ensure the SSN products fit agency needs. Prediction programs give accurate results only if they use mathematical models equivalent to those used in the orbit determination programs. The orbital elements convey a satellite's estimated position based on the type of mathematical model used.

Note: SSN data users should use equivalent models to maintain elements' compatibility and accuracy.

3.3. Points of Contact. The CMOC Combat Operations Branch (JCCDO) is the central point of contact for SSN data requests. Send data requests to CMOC/JCCDO, ATTN: Data Products Officer, Cheyenne Mountain Air Station, Colorado 80914-5601. CMOC/JCCDO either processes the requests or sends them to the appropriate office for processing.

3.4. Requester Documentation. USSPACECOM Form 1, Orbital Data Request. (See attachment 1 for instructions). Local reproduction is authorized.

3.5. Request Priorities. USCINCSPACE space operations missions take precedence over all support requests. CMOC/JCCDO decides the priority of each request.

3.6. Data Review. Notify CMOC/JCCDO, by using USSPACECOM Form 1, when data exceeds requirements. Revalidate requirements annually.

3.7. Data Termination. Notify CMOC/JCCDO when data is no longer required.

3.8. System Effectiveness Evaluation. Notify CMOC/JCCDO immediately of problems encountered or suggestions for improvement. When current system capabilities cannot fulfill user needs for orbital data, this Headquarters may take action to improve capabilities. Document future needs and send them to CMOC/JCCDO as soon as they are known.

3.9. Specific Information for Analyst Satellite Data Requests. CMOC Special Operations (JCCDXA) will review all analyst satellite data requests and notify the point of contact for the data request if additional information is required. CMOC/JCCDXA evaluates each request based on the expressed justification of need. State justification of need in block 9, USSPACECOM Form 1 (attach additional sheets if necessary). Portions of the 8xxxx analyst satellite data base are very strictly controlled and release of the data is based on rigid and exacting specifications of need.

3.10. Outside Agency Requests. Outside Agency Requests are approved under HQ USSPACECOM support agreements with outside agencies, for example, the USSPACECOM/ Goddard Space Flight Center (GFSC) Memorandum of Agreement, 24 Mar 94. These are handled individually as continuous data requests.

3.11. National Agency Requests. Send requests to CMOC/JCCD.

3.12. Contractor Requests. Send requests in support of a DOD or Federal Government contract to CMOC/JCCDO through the contracting officer of the DOD contract for certification.

3.13. Foreign and Commercial Requests. Requests by agencies not directly involved in DOD contracts are approved by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA and DOD Memorandum of Agreement states that the DOD will not give satellite data directly to civilian or scientific organizations or individuals. Send these requests to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 513.1, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000. The SCC has routinely provided support in case of satellite anomalies involving failure to achieve or maintain proper orbit by locating the lost object. This support has been provided on request to both United States space systems and foreign countries. The loss of the RCA SATCOM III and the Japanese ECS-B during synchronous orbit injection highlighted the need for procedures to handle foreign requests. In addition, foreign governments may request the United States temporarily limit operations on selected satellite links to prevent interference with foreign satellites and space probes.

3.13.1. Satellite Support Requestors. The procedures for satellite support operations differs to some extent based on the nature of the request and who is the requester. The R-15 day launch and orbital information formats are used to request SSN support (see attachment 2). R-15/VIMs should be sent to CMOC/JCCDO NLT 2 weeks prior to launch. Requesters include:

3.13.1.1. Foreign governments, multinational consortiums, and foreign launch agencies who do not have existing agreements for support with the SCC or NASA.

3.13.1.2. Foreign governments, multinational consortiums, and foreign launch agencies who have memorandums of understanding with NASA.
3.13.1.3. Allied governments and systems that have or will have memorandums of agreement or interface control drawings (ICD) with the SCC.

3.13.1.4. United States contractors supporting foreign space operations.

3.13.1.5. Requests received by DOD through non-established channels.

3.13.2. Procedures. Use the appropriate procedure to request data:

3.13.2.1. Foreign Governments, Multinational Consortiums and Foreign Launch Agencies Who Do Not Have Existing Agreements For Support with the SCC or NASA. Request is from the foreign government to the United States Embassy in the requestor's country to the US Department of State (DOS) Operation Center watch officer. DOS notifies the National Military Command Center (NMCC) Deputy Director of Operations (DDO), CMOC/JCCD, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and provides approval and releasing instructions. CMOC/JCCDO sends the information requested to NASA GSFC Network Control Center/Network Manager (NCC/NM) for release through DOS or direct from NASA GSFC to the foreign requester. During shuttle missions, NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) will interface directly with the SCC for data to be used by foreign stations (i.e. ESA, CNES, ASC, etc.).

3.13.2.2. Foreign Governments, Foreign Multinational Consortiums and Foreign Agencies That Have Memorandums of Understanding with NASA. Request is from the foreign requester directly to NASA GSFC. NASA GSFC NCC/NM notifies CMOC/JCCD, the DOS watch officer, and NMCC DDO. CMOC/JCCD provides information requested to NASA GSFC NCC/NM for release direct to the foreign requester. NASA GSFC NCC/NM sends a copy to DOS watch officer and NMCC DDO. The DOS watch officer notifies NASA GSFC if data is to be withheld.

3.13.2.3. Allied Governments and Systems That Have or Will Have Memorandums of Agreement or ICDs with the SCC. The SCC will eventually have extensive interfaces with certain allied space systems such as European Space Agency (ESA). The MOAs or ICDs have or will also include the channel for the support requests.

3.13.2.4. United States (US) Contractors Supporting Foreign Space Operations Requests:

3.13.2.4.1. From other United States contractors supporting foreign space operations follow procedures in 3.13.2.1. above.

3.13.2.4.2. From United States contractors supporting foreign space operations whose governments have memorandums of understanding with NASA follow procedures in 3.13.2.2. above.

Note: All requests to limit US satellite operations require the SCC to consolidate owner and operator assessments with the authority of DOS and NMCC. DOS provides authority and instructions for release.

3.13.2.5. Requests Received by DOD Through Non-established Channels. Any foreign requests for support received by DOD organizations are sent to the NMCC DDO surveillance desk except for the SCC and allied systems with MOAs. The NMCC tells the requester to formally request the support through the proper channels and obtains preliminary information to allow DOD to meet the requirement. On approval from the NMCC, CMOC/JCCD fulfills time critical requirements.

3.13.3. Requests for Information Required. Support and limit satellite link operations requests will, under normal conditions, be sent to DOS, NASA, and CMOC/JCCDO as appropriate (see paragraph 3.13.1) 15 days before desired support time. Emergency requests are processed as appropriate to meet time constraints. See attachment 2.

3.13.4. Emergency Support and Pre-event Support:

3.13.4.1. Emergency requests are processed as appropriate to meet time constraints. If time permits, use a message for all support requests, responses, and approvals. If required and the situation warrants, support requests, approvals, and responses are via non-secure conference calls between the appropriate centers; such as DOS (watch officer), NMCC (DDO), CMOC/JCCDO, and NASA GSFC (NCC/NM). Keep centers informed of subsequent actions. Multiple conferences may be required dependent on specific event scenarios such as initial, follow-up, and final conferences. Message traffic follow-up is required.

3.13.4.2. In addition to the R-15 day launch and orbital information in attachment 2, include: country and satellite, where launched, what the problems are, what support is required, who is the contact and how they can be reached, times of support, and possible effect and impact (political, military, economic).

Chapter 4

DATA DISTRIBUTION METHODS

4.1. General. SSN products can be distributed three ways: electronically, via postal routes, and telephonically. Data users should contact CMOC/JCCD prior to requesting data to determine if their desired method of transfer is available for the product they are requesting.

4.2. Electronic Message Transfer. The SSN uses the military communications network through the Communications System Segment (CSS) located within Cheyenne Mountain Air Station. The CSS provides complete compatibility with other existing systems using either Joint Army-Navy-Air Force Publication (JANAP) 128 or Automatic Digital Communications Control Protocol (ADCCP). The CSS transmits directly to users with a telecommunications center. Ensure the complete electronic address, routing indicator are clearly stated on the USSPACECOM Form 1. This method of transmission is used for most data requests because of immediate dispatch to the requester, minimum handling and processing, and less damage to data by shipping and handling

Note: Automatic distribution can occur on all changes or updates to the information desired. Future plans are being made to provide data electronically through a bulletin board service.

4.3 Postal Transfer. SSN products that cannot be distributed electronically may be distributed via the Postal Service in either magnetic media format or hardcopy format. Ensure the complete mailing address and attention lines are clearly stated on the USSPACECOM Form 1. Contractors must ensure their government contracting officer endorses the USSPACECOM Form 1.

4.3.1. Magnetic Media Format. Output can be provided on 1/2 inch magnetic tape (9-track), 8mm data cartridge, 1/4 inch tape, or 3.5 inch floppy disc. All output may be sorted in ascending or descending direction.

4.3.2. Hardcopy Format. Output can be provided in hardcopy format if requested.

4.3.3. Microfiche. Some output can be provided on microfiche.

4.4. Telephonic Transfer. Smaller SSN products that cannot be distributed electronically can be transferred telephonically. Ensure the complete DSN and/or commercial telephone number are clearly stated on the USSPACECOM Form 1.

OFFICIAL JOSEPH W. ASHY
General, USAF
Commander in Chief

ROBERT F. KOENIG, JR.
Colonel, USAF
Director of Information Management

Distribution:

6 SOPS/DOX, Offutt AFB NE 68113-4027 1
21 SOPS/DOR, Onizuka AS, Sunnyvale CA 94086-1235 2
45 MXS/MAV, Patrick AFB FL 32925-3238 1
45 SW/SEY, Patrick AFB FL 32925-3238 1
392 TRS/DOC, Vandenberg AFB CA 93437-5314 2
AFSPC/SWSC/SMSRC, Peterson AFB CO 80914-5000 2
Air Command & Staff College/DEA, Maxwell AFB AL 36112-6426 1
Allied Signal Communications Systems, Dept 604, Baltimore MD 21286-5999 1
ANMCC/AN-XO, Ft Ritchie MD 21719-5000 1
Commander, Naval Space Command/VN611, Dahlgren VA 22448-5170 1
Commander, USA WSMR/STEWS-IDD-R, White Sands Missile Range NM 88002-5141 2
CSR 3202, Patrick AFB FL 32925-0127 2
DEFSMAC, Ft George G. Meade MD 20755-6000 2
DMA Aerospace Center/GGP, St Louis MO 63118-3399 2
DMA Systems Center/PEC, Reston VA 22090-3221 1
ESC/XRD, Colorado Springs CO 80906-5000 2
GTE Government Systems Corp, Colorado Springs CO 80910-5000 1
GTE Government Systems Corp, Mountain View CA 94043-5000 1
HQ AFGWC/DOO, Offutt AFB NE 68113-4039 3
HQ DMA/PRA, Fairfax VA 22031-2137 1
HQ USAF (INXY-1, XOFS-1, XORR-1), Washington DC 20330-1480 3
HQ USAFA/DFAS, USAF Academy CO 80840-6224 1
HQ USSPACECOM/HO Peterson AFB CO 80914-3160 1
ITT Federal Services Corp/RS400, Bldg 848, Vandenberg AFB CA 93437-5000 2
JCS/J-36/DSOD, Washington DC 20318-3000 1
Jet Propulsion Lab, Bldg 303-404, Pasadena CA 91109-8099 1
Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, Palo Alto CA 94304-5000 1
Loral Command & Control Systems, Colorado Springs CO 80921-3603 1
Loral Vought Systems, Dallas TX 75265-5000 1
Los Alamos National Laboratory (NIS2-2, T6-1), Los Alamos NM 87545-5000 3
Marshall Repository/CN22D, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center AL 35812-5000 1
MIT Lincoln Lab, Box 73, Lexington MA 02173-5000 1
NAIC/TA (TAS-1,TASC-1,DXD-1,DXSS-1), Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-5626 4
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 501, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 2
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 513.1, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 1
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 530, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 1
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 534, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 2
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 550, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 4
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 553, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 2
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Code 630/NSDC, Greenbelt MD 20771-5000 1
NASA Johnson Space Center (DM-411-1, SN-3-1), Houston TX 77058-5000 2
National Security Agency, ATTN: W-16, Ft George G. Meade MD 20755-6000 1
Naval Research Laboratory/Code 8100, Washington DC 20375-5354 2
Pacific Missile Range Facility (Code 7331 & 7332), Kekaha, Kauai HI 96752-0128 2
Phillips Lab/GPSS, Sunspot NM 88349-5000 1
Phillips Lab/IN, Kirtland AFB NM 87117-5776 1
Rome Lab/OCTS, Griffis AFB NY 13441-1445 2
SMC (CU-4, IMO-1, MT-1, SD-1, XR-1) Los Angeles AFB CA 90245-4683 8
Teledyne Brown Engineering, Colorado Springs CO 80910-5000 1
Textron Defense Systems, Kihei HI 96753-5000 1
Textron Defense Systems, Wilmington MA 01887-5000 1
US Naval Observatory, Washington DC 20392-5420 1

TOTAL 87

HOW TO FILL OUT AN ORBITAL DATA REQUEST
(USSPACECOM FORM 1)

ITEMS ENTRY

1 Show date of preparation.

2 Place "TO" address here.

3 Self-explanatory.

5 Show names of individuals actually using the data. Complete all columns.

6 Cite the military contract title or common name and branch of service.

7 For nonmilitary contractor-generated requests only, process all requests not associated with or approved by a DOD military contract monitor through NASA. Contractors responding to military research contracts mark this block N/A.

8 Give a brief description of the project, what data are requested, how the data is used, and an end result of the use of the data.

9 Identify the exact data needed and the time span required. Results that are general in nature cannot be filled until the exact needs are known.

10 Define any special requirements peculiar to the request or the use of the data, its accuracy, and so forth.

11 Specify mailing address, nearest military installation, teletype address or other information that indicated the best method of delivery of the data requested.

12 Self-explanatory.

13 Specify termination date. If the data is one time only, enter OTO in this block. This block must be completed or the request cannot be processed.

15-20 The DOD or Federal government contracting officer verifies the civilian contractor's need for the data. If the data is classified, the company's need-to-know is stated in writing. The contracting officer is the point of contact for questions on the data request.

Note: All users are required to revalidate their need for orbital data on a yearly basis, sending a new completed USSPACECOM Form 1 to CMOC/JCCDO, ATTN: Data Products Officer, Suite 9-102, 1 NORAD RD, CMAS, CO 80914-6033.

HOW TO PREPARE AN R-15 MESSAGE

A2.1. When constructing the R-15 message, review these requirements:

A2.1.1. Make no reference to program number.

A2.1.2. Subject line must be unclassified.

A2.1.3. For classified messages, show the classification of each item in the message.

A2.1.4. Complete item 6 for all orbits and objects.

A2.1.5. If an item does not apply, enter N/A for the item, unless none is required.

A2.1.6. For shuttle missions, include objects to be deployed in item 6. Be sure to include any special support requirements for objects deployed in item 12.

A2.1.7. Provide definition of acronyms at the end of each item.

A2.1.8. Item 12 includes downgrading instructions and the applicable security classification guide used. Also indicate what, if any, information can be publicly released after launch. For objects to be retrieved, include retrieval times and final disposition of each object after retrieval (will the object be returned to orbit at a later date or will the object be permanently removed from orbit).

Note: DOD 5200.1-R/AFR 205-1, chapter VIII, provides specific directions for "foreign release" to a multinational command such as NORAD. Include the countries to which that information and data can be released. Indicate all classified information that can be downgraded after launch.

SUBJECT: R-15/VIM for (Booster and Payload(s))

ITEM 1: Launch site.

ITEM 1A: Launch date.

ITEM 2: Earliest launch time. (GMT, HH:MM:SS)

ITEM 2A: Latest launch time. (GMT, HH:MM:SS)

ITEM 3: List the total number and name of each object to achieve orbit.

Note: For items 3A, 3B, and 3C include information on: mass, dimensions, physical description, stabilization method, and spin rate for each piece, where applicable.

ITEM 3A: Payload(s) to achieve orbit. In addition to the information requested above, include the nominal (operational) lifetime and operating position for each.

ITEM 3B: Rocket bodies (booster segments) to achieve orbit. If none achieve orbit, enter "none."

ITEM 3C: All other objects to achieving orbit, including debris, debris clusters, bolts, and so forth. If none will achieve orbit, enter "none."

ITEM 4: Launch booster and sustainer description. If booster is augmented by strap-on motors, list the number and type.

ITEM 5: Point of contact (POC) for the launch. Include name, address, and telephone number of the individual(s) to be contacted concerning launch information.

ITEM 6: Orbital parameter information for all objects achieving orbit, and on all intermediate orbits up to and including the final (operational) orbit. If possible, information should be in units and accuracy specified in ( ) in items 6A thru 7E.

ITEM 6A: Inertial Launch azimuth at liftoff. (Degrees, XXX.XXX)

ITEM 6B: Inertial flight azimuth after liftoff. (Degrees, XXX.XXX)

ITEM 6C: Epoch time used to calculate parameters. (GMT, year, day, HH:MM:SS.S)

ITEM 6D: Nominal period. (Minutes, XXX.xx)

ITEM 6E: Inclination. (Degrees, XX.xxx)

ITEM 6F: Eccentricity. (X.xxxx)

ITEM 6G: Semimajor axis. (Kilometers, XXXX.x)

ITEM 6H: Argument of perigee. (Degrees, XXX.xxx)

ITEM 6I: Right ascension of the ascending node, measured from the first point of Aires. (Degrees, XXX.xxx)

ITEM 6J: Mean Anomaly. (Degrees, XXX.xxx)

Note: State vectors are acceptable as a substitute for 6D through 6J, request they be in inertial true-of-date coordinates. State which propagator they were produced by, mean vectors are preferred.

ITEM 6K: Start time of orbit. (HH:MM:SS, after launch)

ITEM 6L: End time of orbit. (HH:MM:SS, after launch)

ITEM 7: Injection data for all pieces and orbits as described below:

ITEM 7A: Injection point latitude, measured positive north and negative south. (Degrees, =/- XX.xxx)

ITEM 7B: Injection point longitude, measured positive east. (Degrees East, XXX.xxx)

ITEM 7C: Inertial azimuth at injection point. (Degrees, XXX.xxx)

ITEM 7D: Height above Earth at injection point. (Kilometers, XXXX.x)

ITEM 7E: Injection time. (HH:MM:SS, after liftoff)

ITEM 8: Sequence of events from liftoff (HH:MM:SS = 00:00:00) to final injection into operational orbit. Require times for each in HH:MM:SS from liftoff. Events include: separation of booster(s)/stage(s), motor ignition(s)/cutoff(s), jettison of pieces (fairings etc.), maneuvers and reorientation, deorbit and ejection(s) of packages/booms and so forth.

ITEM 9: Schedule of events during the active life of all payloads. Events include: maneuvers, cover jettisons, solar array extensions, venting, spinning/despinning of satellite or satellite portions, attitude changes, and anything else that may effect orbital characteristics.

ITEM 10: Mission brief of payload(s).

ITEM 11: Transmitting frequency and power of all devices (including booster segments and continuous radio transmissions) and schedule and power of all lights (if any) throughout the operational life. Statement of whether emission is fixed by program, command, or transponder tracking signal.

ITEM 12: Cataloging instructions and remarks. Please state common name of payloads, owner organization, and country for each.

ORBITAL MECHANICS REFERENCES

"Mathematical Foundation for SCC Astrodynamic Theory", NORAD Technical Publication TP SCC 008, 6 April 1982, including all revisions.

For information contact:
Space & Warning Systems Center/SMS (Attn: Mr. Jan Steel)
160 Patrick St.
Peterson AFB, CO 80914-2530

719-554-9423
DSN 692-9423

For technical information and assistance with the theory contact:
Space Warfare Center/SA (Attn: Dr. Joseph Liu)
730 Irwin Ave.
Falcon AFB, CO 80912-7300

719-380-3044
DSN 749-3044
FAX 719-380-3496