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63402F Space Test Program(2)

The Space Test Program advances DOD space technology by providing spaceflight for DOD prioritized experiments: free flyer, shuttle hitch-hiker and shuttle mid-deck experiments. STP experiments are flown by priority, based on relevance to existing military requirements and the availability of cost effective means of space-flight on expendable launch vehicles or the shuttle. These flights are used for demonstration of new system technologies, concepts and designs, and for determining space environmental effects on military space systems. Historically, 45% of the free-flyer experiments can be satisfied by small satellite (100 to 500 pound class) missions, 35% require medium satellite (500 to 4,000 pounds) missions and 20% fly as piggyback missions. STP is also the pathfinder for exploiting the Shuttle as a manned DoD Space laboratory to exploit the infusion of new technology into space systems through the use of simpler, incrementally designed, man-aided experiments. Experience gained from this approach is key in fully defining military man's role in space. Currently, this project supports spacecraft development of 6 expendable launch vehicle (ELV) missions, on-orbit operations of 7 satellites, and integration of 8 piggyback experiments on non-STP developed spacecraft.

This program initiates, integrates, tests, conducts System Design Reviews and Critical Design Reviews, launches, supports and recovers the following spacecraft and payloads.

P86-1 CRRES Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

P87-1 Polar Bear

P87-2 STACKSAT satellites (three)

P89-1A REX Radiation Experiment

P89-1B ALEXIS Array of Low Energy X-ray Imaging Sensors

P90-6 APEX Advanced Photovoltaic & Electronics Experiments

P91-1 ARGOS Medium Launch Vehicle (MLV - Class) Advanced Research & Global Observation Satellite

P91-2 SIDEX Signal Identification Experiment - STEP (Space Test Experimental Platform) mission-2

P92-1 RADCAL Radar Calibration experiment

P92-A FORTE

BINRAD Naval Research Laboratory Beryllium Induced Radiation Experiment - on Russian RESURS satellite

CHARGECON-GEO Automated Charge Control at Geosynchronous Altitude

EHlC / MAXIE Energetic Heavy Ion Composition / Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment - on Thermal Infrared Observation Satellite (TlROS) - Atlas E

GLO Cryogenic Heat Pipe (GCP) hitchhiker experiment on STS-53

MAHRS Middle Atmosphere High Resolution Spectrograph - on CRISTA SPAS

POGS-II Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Survey - on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)

RAIDS Remote Atmospheric & Ionospheric Detection System on TIROS-J

SPREE Shuttle Potential and Return Electron Experiment

STEP (Space Test Experimental Platform) mission 0

STEP (Space Test Experimental Platform) mission 1

STEP (Space Test Experimental Platform) mission 3

STEP (Space Test Experimental Platform) mission 4

SWIM Solar Wind Imaging Experiment

Other Shuttle based experiments include Hercules, AMOS,APE-B, CONCOP1, CREAM, HRSGS-A, RME-II and -III, SLS, STAR, STL AMOS, UPVI, VFT-2,

The responsible Air Force agency is Air Force Materiel Command, Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles AFB, CA. Systems engineering is provided by the Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA. Government developing organizations include NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Contractors include TRW, Redondo Beach, CA; Defense Systems, Inc., McLean, VA; Rockwell International Seal Beach CA; and Orbital Sciences Corporation, Chantilly, VA. A Memorandum of Agreement exists between STP and ONR to secure secondary capacity on the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) SPOT-3 spacecraft for ONR's Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM II) experiment.

63401F Advanced Spacecraft Technology(3)

Defines, develops and demonstrates new or improved space vehicle subsystem concepts or prototypes. Primary goals are to increase satellite survivability, autonomy, reliability, performance and lifetime. Secondary goals are to accomplish primary goals with lighter, lower power, less complex, more economical subsystems than currently exist. Provides military space programs with fully developed and proven subsystems to advance space program capabilities while minimizing costs, schedule performance risks. Provides advanced space technology planning through the Military Space Systems Technology Model. Excludes military and civilian personnel and their related costs and military construction costs which are included in appropriate management and support elements in this program.

Project 682J, Advanced Space Power Technology. This project demonstrates compact, survivable, satellite power generation, storage, and processing systems. Power generation work is focused on lightweight, low-cost, and moderately survivable solar arrays. Energy storage work is focused on demonstrating lightweight Nickel Hydrogen (NiH2) and Sodium Sulfur (NaS) spacecraft batteries for five to ten year satellite missions. NiH2 batteries are half the mass of existing satellite batteries and the ongoing life test will demonstrate a five year low earth orbit (LEO) life capability. Power processing efforts focus on producing lightweight, high efficiency, standardized subsystem designs for use on future high power, more survivable Air Force satellites. This project also develops and demonstrates non-nuclear technologies such as power conversion, conditioning, and thermal management that are associated with space nuclear power systems. It investigates alternatives to increase power subsystem performance, lifetime, survivability, and safety while reducing costs. It will also help define future technology and reactor objectives and guide Department of Energy space nuclear power programs which support Air Force needs such as space-based surveillance satellites, electric orbit transfer capability, advanced meteorological satellites, and future early warning systems.

Managed by the Phillips Laboratory's Space and Missiles Directorate, Kirtland AFB, NM. Contractors are: Honeywell Clearwater, FL; IBM, Manassas, VA; and Mission Research Corp., Santa Barbara, CA. The analytical and numerical astrodynamics development accomplished primarily in-house with some university support as required.

Project 3834, Advanced Spacecraft Technology Integration - This project integrates maturing technologies into space vehicles to demonstrate their practicality and to respond to space system user needs. Demonstrations presently being conducted are the Technology for the Autonomous Operational Survivability (TAOS) and a demonstration of an electric propulsion system on a satellite. The latter is jointly funded by Program Element 0603302F, which provides the propulsion technology. The TAOS program is a satellite autonomy and survivability demonstration. TAOS subsystems are being integrated into a small spacecraft and will be placed into a low earth orbit for 12 months. TAOS will demonstrate and validate advanced spaceborne computers, autonomous navigation hardware and software, laser sensors, radar sensors, advanced data buses, and various spacecraft operational concepts. The electric propulsion demonstration will demonstrate the feasibility of a fully integrated electric orbital maneuvering system (EOMS). An EOMS provides faster and more fuel efficient repositioning of on-orbit assets and the ability to launch payloads with smaller rockets. Cooperative development of this dual-use technology with industry will increase U.S. competitiveness in global markets. The electric propulsion demonstration includes: an arcjet propulsion subsystem; a high-output solar power subsystem; and an autonomous Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) package.

Managed by the Phillips Laboratory's Space Experiments Directorate, Kirtland AFB, NM. Contractors are: TRW, Military Space Systems Division, Redondo Beach, CA; Microcosm, Torrance, CA; Rockwell, Anaheim, CA; Honeywell, Phoenix, AZ; GTE, Mountain View, CA; and I3C, Foster City, CA.

Project 3977, Thermionic Space Power: This project develops and demonstrates the non-nuclear technologies such as power conversion, conditioning, and thermal management that are associated with space nuclear power systems. It investigates alternatives to increase power subsystem performance, lifetime, survivability, and safety while reducing costs. It will also help define future technology and reactor objectives and guide Department of Energy space nuclear power programs which support Air Force needs. This project was terminated in FY 1994 and the technical content moved into Project 682J, Advanced Space Power Technology.

Managed by the Phillips Laboratory's Space and Missiles Directorate, Kirtland AFB, NM. The top five contractors are: GA Technologies, San Diego, CA; Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA; Space Power Inc., San Jose, CA; Orion International, Albuquerque NM; and Auburn University, Auburn, AL.

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http://www.fas.org/spp/military/program/test/overview.htm
Maintained by Robert Sherman
Originally created by John Pike
Updated Tuesday, August 19, 1997 6:24:02 PM