REGARDING PROLIFERATION OF MISSILE TECHNOLOGY FROM RUSSIA TO IRAN (Senate - November 07, 1997)

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Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Senate proceed to the immediate consideration of calendar No. 250, Senate Concurrent Resolution 48.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report.

The legislative clerk read as follows:

A concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 48) expressing the sense of Congress regarding proliferation of missile technology from Russia to Iran.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection to the immediate consideration of the concurrent resolution?

There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the concurrent resolution.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table, and that any statements relating to the resolution appear at this point in the Record.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.

The concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 48) was agreed to.

The preamble was agreed to.

The concurrent resolution, with its preamble, is as follows:

S. Con. Res. 48

Whereas there is substantial evidence missile technology and technical advice have been provided from Russia to Iran, in violation of the Missile Technology Control Regime;

Whereas these violations include providing assistance to Iran in developing ballistic missiles, including the transfer of wind tunnel and rocket engine testing equipment;

Whereas these technologies give Iran the capability to deploy a missile of sufficient range to threaten United States military installations in the Middle East and Persian Gulf, as well as the territory of Israel, and our North Atlantic Treaty Organization ally Turkey; and

Whereas President Clinton has raised with Russian President Boris Yeltsin United States concerns about these activities and the Russian response has to date been inadequate: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that--

(1) the President should demand that the Government of Russia take concrete actions to stop governmental and nongovernmental entities in the Russian Federation from providing missile technology and technical advice to Iran, in violation of the Missile Technology Control Regime;

(2) if the Russian response is inadequate, the United States should impose sanctions on the responsible Russian entities in accordance with Executive Order 12938 on the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, and reassess cooperative activities with Russia;

(3) the threshold under current law allowing for the waiver of the prohibition on the release of foreign assistance to Russia should be raised; and

(4) our European allies should be encouraged to take steps in accordance with their own laws to stop such proliferation.

Mr. KOHL. Mr. President, I rise today to thank my colleagues for their support of Senate Concurrent Resolution 48, which was adopted by unanimous consent.

This resolution is important because over the past few months a series of increasingly troubling reports have been published indicating Russian organizations are continuing to provide missile assistance to Iran. According to these reports, Russia has supplied blueprints and components for the 2,000 kilometer range SS-4 ballistic missile, as well as a wide variety of equipment and material useful in the design and manufacture of ballistic missiles, including special metals, a wind tunnel, and missile design software.

These press accounts are corroborated by an unclassified CIA report to Congress released in June titled, `The Acquisition of Technology Relating to Weapons of Mass Destruction and Advanced Conventional Munitions,' which states that, `Russia supplied a variety of ballistic missile-related goods to foreign countries [in late 1996], especially Iran.'

These reports clearly make the point that the assistance provided by Russian organizations is the critical factor which has accelerated the pace of Iran's ballistic missile program and may enable Tehran to complete development of a missile, called the Shahab-3, that will have sufficient range to strike United States forces in the region and Israel in as little as 12 to 18 months. In addition, Iran is also receiving Russian assistance with the development of a second missile, called the Shahab-4, that would have enough range to reach Central Europe and could be deployed in as little as 3 years.

The resolution adopted today expresses the sense of the Congress that the President should demand that the Russian Government take concrete actions to stop governmental and nongovernmental organizations from assisting Iran's missile program. If Russia fails to respond to United States concerns, the resolution calls on the President to impose sanctions on the responsible Russian entities.

This legislation does not require new sanctions, but rather calls on the administration to enforce the substantial amount of existing sanctions law. The fact that the resolution was adopted by unanimous consent in the Senate and passed by an overwhelming vote of 414 to 8 in the House of Representatives sends a clear signal to Russia and the administration that this dangerous trade must stop now.

I am very pleased that from its inception, this resolution has enjoyed bipartisan support; 39 Senators, from both sides of the aisle, cosponsored the measure and I want to thank them for their support and also thank Representative Jane Harman who was the principal sponsor of the resolution in the House of Representatives and worked tirelessly on its behalf. It has been a pleasure working with Representative Harman over the past few months and I look forward to continuing to work closely with her to address the national security challenges facing our nation.

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Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, I suggest the absence of a quorum.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.

The assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, the quorum call is rescinded.

END