Union Calendar No. 486

104th Congress, 2d Session - - - - - - - - - - - - House Report 104-884

REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY FOR THE 104TH CONGRESS

GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>.

January 2, 1997.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

HOUSE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY One Hundred Fourth Congress

FLOYD D. SPENCE, South Carolina, Chairman


RONALD V. DELLUMS, California        BOB STUMP, Arizona
G.V. (SONNY) MONTGOMERY, Mississippi DUNCAN HUNTER, California
PATRICIA SCHROEDER, Colorado         JOHN R. KASICH, Ohio
IKE SKELTON, Missouri                HERBERT H. BATEMAN, Virginia
NORMAN SISISKY, Virginia             JAMES V. HANSEN, Utah
JOHN M. SPRATT, Jr., South Carolina  CURT WELDON, Pennsylvania
SOLOMON P. ORTIZ, Texas              ROBERT K. DORNAN, California
OWEN PICKETT, Virginia               JOEL HEFLEY, Colorado
LANE EVANS, Illinois                 JIM SAXTON, New Jersey
JOHN TANNER, Tennessee               RANDY ``DUKE'' CUNNINGHAM, 
GLEN BROWDER, Alabama                 California                                                                                                            
GENE TAYLOR, Mississippi             STEVE BUYER, Indiana
NEIL ABERCROMBIE, Hawaii             PETER G. TORKILDSEN, Massachusetts
CHET EDWARDS, Texas                  TILLIE K. FOWLER, Florida
FRANK TEJEDA, Texas                  JOHN M. McHUGH, New York
MARTIN T. MEEHAN, Massachusetts      JAMES TALENT, Missouri
ROBERT A. UNDERWOOD, Guam            TERRY EVERETT, Alabama
JANE HARMAN, California              ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland
PAUL McHALE, Pennsylvania            HOWARD ``BUCK'' McKEON, California
PETE GEREN, Texas                    RON LEWIS, Kentucky
PETE PETERSON, Florida               J.C. WATTS, Jr., Oklahoma
WILLIAM J. JEFFERSON, Louisiana      MAC THORNBERRY, Texas
ROSA L. DeLAURO, Connecticut         JOHN N. HOSTETTLER, Indiana
MIKE WARD, Kentucky                  SAXBY CHAMBLISS, Georgia
PATRICK J. KENNEDY, Rhode Island     VAN HILLEARY, Tennessee
                                     JOE SCARBOROUGH, Florida
                                     WALTER B. JONES, Jr., North 
                                     Carolina
                                     JAMES B. LONGLEY, Jr., Maine
                                     TODD TIAHRT, Kansas
                                     RICHARD ``DOC'' HASTINGS, 
                                     Washington
  Andrew K. Ellis, Staff Director
  Andrea K. Aquino, Professional 
           Staff Member

                                  (ii)


                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                          Committee on National Security,
                          Washington, DC, January 2, 1997.


Hon. Robin H. Carle,
Clerk of the House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Carle: Pursuant to House Rule XI 1.(d), there is 
transmitted herewith the report of activities of the Committee 
on National Security for the 104th Congress.
            Sincerely,
                                         Floyd D. Spence, Chairman.

                                 (iii)

                                     


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Powers and Duties, Committee on National Security--104th Congress     1
    Background...................................................     1
    Constitutional Powers and Duties.............................     2
    House Rules on Jurisdiction..................................     3
    Investigative Authority and Legislative Oversight............     3
Committee Rules..................................................     4
    Rules Governing Procedure....................................     4
Composition of the Committee on National Security--104th Congress    13
Subcommittees of the Committee on National Security--104th 
  Congress.......................................................    14
    Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee...........    14
    Military Personnel Subcommittee..............................    14
    Military Procurement Subcommittee............................    15
    Military Readiness Subcommittee..............................    15
    Military Research and Development Subcommittee...............    16
Full Committee Panels............................................    17
    Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation....    17
    Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine...............    17
Committee Staff..................................................    19
Committee Meetings...............................................    21
Legislative Actions..............................................    21
    Legislation Enacted Into Law.................................    21
        Public Law 104-93 (H.R. 1655)............................    21
        Public Law 104-106 (S. 1124).............................    22
        Public Law 104-201 (H.R. 3230)...........................    24
        Public Law 104-208 (H.R. 2202)...........................    27
        Public Law 104-239 (H.R. 1350)...........................    27
        Public Law 104-293 (H.R. 3259)...........................    28
    Legislation Vetoed by the President..........................    28
        H.R. 1530................................................    28
    Legislation Reported but Not Enacted.........................    29
        H. Con. Res. 180.........................................    29
        H. Con. Res. 200.........................................    29
        H.J. Res. 102............................................    29
        H.R. 7...................................................    30
        H.R. 256.................................................    30
        H.R. 1141................................................    30
        H.R. 2754................................................    31
        H.R. 3142................................................    31
        H.R. 3144................................................    31
        H.R. 3237................................................    32
        H.R. 3308................................................    32
        H.R. 4000................................................    33
    Legislation Considered but Not Reported......................    33
        H.R. 1646................................................    33
        H.R. 1670................................................    33
        H.R. 3322................................................    34
        H.R. 4282................................................    34
Oversight Activities.............................................    35
    Summary of Oversight Plan....................................    35
    Actions and Recommendations..................................    35
    Additional Oversight Activities..............................    39
Other Activities of the Full Committee...........................    45
    Budget Activity..............................................    45
    Full Committee Hearings......................................    45
    Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation....    50
    Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine...............    51
Other Activities of Subcommittees................................    53
    Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee...........    53
    Military Personnel Subcommittee..............................    55
    Military Procurement Subcommittee............................    55
    Military Readiness Subcommittee..............................    56
    Military Research and Development Subcommittee...............    56
Publications.....................................................    59
    Committee Prints of Laws Relating to National Defense........    59
    Committee Prints.............................................    59
    Published Proceedings........................................    59
    House Reports................................................    63
    Public Laws..................................................    65
    Vetoes.......................................................    65
Press Releases...................................................    67


                                                 Union Calendar No. 486
104th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 2d Session                                                     104-884
_______________________________________________________________________


REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY FOR THE 
                             104TH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

January 2, 1997.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


  Mr. Spence, from the Committee on National Security, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                                   ON

   POWERS AND DUTIES, COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY--104TH CONGRESS

                               Background

    The House Committee on National Security (formerly the 
House Committee on Armed Services), a standing committee of 
Congress, was established on January 2, 1947, as a part of the 
Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 812), by 
merging the Committees on Military Affairs and Naval Affairs. 
The Committees on Military Affairs and Naval Affairs were 
established in 1882. In 1885, jurisdiction over military and 
naval appropriations was taken from the Committee on 
Appropriations and given to the Committees on Military Affairs 
and Naval Affairs, respectively. This policy continued until 
July 1, 1920, when jurisdiction over all appropriations was 
again placed in the Committee on Appropriations.
    In the 93rd Congress, following a study by the House Select 
Committee on Committees, the House of Representatives passed H. 
Res. 988, the Committee Reform Amendment, of 1974, to be 
effective January 3, 1975. As a result of those amendments, the 
jurisdictional areas of the Committee on Armed Services 
remained essentially unchanged. However, oversight functions 
were amended to require each standing committee to review and 
study on a continuing basis all laws, programs, and government 
activities dealing with or involving international arms control 
and disarmament and the education of military dependents in 
school.
    The rules changes adopted by the House of Representatives 
on January 4, 1977 as set forth in H. Res. 5, placed new 
responsibilities in the atomic energy field in the Armed 
Services Committee. Those responsibilities involved the 
national security aspects of atomic energy theretofore under 
the jurisdiction of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. 
Public Law 95-110, effective September 20, 1977, abolished the 
Joint Committee on Atomic Energy.
    With the adoption of H. Res. 658 on July 14, 1977, which 
established the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence, the jurisdiction of the Armed Service Committee 
over intelligence matters was diminished. That resolution gave 
the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence oversight 
responsibilities for intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities and programs of the U.S. Government. Specifically, 
the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence had exclusive 
legislative jurisdiction regarding the Central Intelligence 
Agency and the director of Central Intelligence, including the 
authorization of funding and programs. Also, legislative 
jurisdiction over all intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities and programs was vested in the select committee 
except that other committees with a jurisdictional interest 
could request consideration of any such matters. Accordingly, 
as a matter of practice, the Armed Services Committee shared 
jurisdiction over the authorization process involving 
intelligence-related activities.
    The committee continues to have shared jurisdiction over 
military intelligence activities as set forth in Rule X (10) of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives.
    H. Res. 5, adopted by the House on January 4, 1995, 
established the Committee on National Security as the successor 
committee to the Committee on Armed Services, and granted the 
committee additional legislative and oversight authority over 
merchant marine academies, national security aspects of the 
merchant marine policy and programs, and interoceanic canals. 
H. Res. 5 also codified the existing jurisdiction of the 
committee over tactical intelligence matters and the 
intelligence related activities of the Department of Defense.

                    Constitutional Powers and Duties

    The powers and duties of Congress in relation to national 
defense matters stem from Article I, section 8, of the 
Constitution, which provides, among other things, that the 
Congress shall have power to:
          Raise and support armies;
          Provide and maintain a navy;
          Make rules for the government and regulation of the 
        land and naval forces;
          Provide for calling forth the militia;
          Provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the 
        militia, and for governing such part of them as may be 
        employed in the service of the United States;
          Exercise exclusive legislation * * * over all places 
        purchased * * * for the erection of forts, magazines, 
        arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings; and
          Make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
        carrying into execution the foregoing powers.

                      House Rules on Jurisdiction

    Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives 
established the jurisdiction and related functions for each 
standing committee. Under that rule, all bills, resolutions, 
and other matters relating to subjects within the jurisdiction 
of any standing shall be referred to such committee. The 
jurisdiction of the House Committee on National Security, 
pursuant to clause 2(k) of rule X is as follows:
          (1) Ammunition depots; forts; arsenals; Army, Navy, 
        and Air Force reservations and establishments.
          (2) Common defense generally.
          (3) Conservation, development, and use of naval 
        petroleum and oil shale reserves.
          (4) The Department of Defense generally, including 
        the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force 
        generally.
          (5) Interoceanic canals generally, including measures 
        relating to the maintenance, operation, and 
        administration of interoceanic canals.
          (6) Merchant Marine Academy, and State Maritime 
        Academies.
          (7) Military applications of nuclear energy.
          (8) Tactical intelligence and intelligence related 
        activities of the Department of the Defense.
          (9) National security aspects of merchant marine, 
        including financial assistance for the construction and 
        operation of vessels, the maintenance of the U.S. 
        shipbuilding and ship repair industrial base, cabotage, 
        cargo preference and merchant marine officers and 
        seamen as these matters relate to the national 
        security.
          (10) Pay, promotion, retirement, and other benefits 
        and privileges of members of the armed forces.
          (11) Scientific research and development in support 
        of the armed services.
          (12) Selective service.
          (13) Size and composition of the Army, Navy, Marine 
        Corps, and Air Force.
          (14) Soldiers' and sailors' homes.
          (15) Strategic and critical materials necessary for 
        the common defense.
    In addition to its legislative jurisdiction and general 
oversight function, the committee has special oversight 
functions with respect to international arms control and 
disarmament and military dependents' education.

           Investigative Authority and Legislative Oversight

    During the 93rd Congress, H. Res. 988, the Committee Reform 
Amendments of 1974, amended rule XI, clause 1(b), of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, to provide general authority 
for each committee to investigate matters within its 
jurisdiction. That amendment established a permanent 
investigative authority and relieves the committee of the 
former requirement of obtaining a renewal of the investigative 
authority by a House resolution at the beginning of each 
Congress. H. Res. 988 also amended rule X of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives by requiring, as previously indicated, 
that the standing committees are to conduct legislative 
oversight in the area of their respective jurisdiction, and by 
establishing specific oversight functions for the Committee on 
National Security.
    H. Res. 107, approved by the House on March 15, 1995, 
provided funds for oversight responsibilities to be conducted 
in the 104th Congress, pursuant to rule X, clause 2(b)(1), of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives (relating to general 
oversight responsibilities), clause 3(a) (relating to special 
oversight functions), and rule XI, clause 1(b) (relating to 
investigations and studies).

                            COMMITTEE RULES

    The committee held its organizational meeting on January 
10, 1995, and adopted the following rules governing procedure 
and rules for investigative hearings conducted by 
subcommittees.
    (H.N.S.C. No. 1)

                       Rules Governing Procedure

                   RULE 1. APPLICATION OF HOUSE RULES

    The Rules of the House of Representatives are the rules of 
the Committee on National Security (hereafter referred to in 
these rules as the ``Committee'') and its subcommittees so far 
as applicable.

                  RULE 2. FULL COMMITTEE MEETING DATE

    (a) The Committee shall meet every Tuesday at 10:00 a.m., 
and at such other times as may be fixed by the chairman of the 
Committee (hereafter referred to in these rules as the 
``Chairman''), or by written request of members of the 
Committee pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.
    (b) A Tuesday meeting of the committee may be dispensed 
with by the Chairman, but such action may be reversed by a 
written request of a majority of the members of the Committee.

                   RULE 3. SUBCOMMITTEE MEETING DATES

    Each subcommittee is authorized to meet, hold hearings, 
receive evidence, and report to the Committee on all matters 
referred to it. Insofar as possible, meetings of the Committee 
and its subcommittees shall not conflict. A subcommittee 
chairman shall set meeting dates after consultation with the 
Chairman and the other subcommittee chairmen with a view toward 
avoiding simultaneous scheduling of committee and subcommittee 
meetings or hearings wherever possible.

                         RULE 4. SUBCOMMITTEES

    The Committee shall be organized to consist of five 
standing subcommittees with the following jurisdictions:
    Subcommittee on Military Installations and Facilities: 
military construction; real estate acquisitions and disposals; 
housing and support; base closure; and related legislative 
oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Personnel: military forces and 
authorized strengths; integration of active and reserve 
components; military personnel policy; compensation and other 
benefits; and related legislative oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Procurement: the annual 
authorization for procurement of military weapon systems and 
components thereof, including full scale development and 
systems transition; military application of nuclear energy; and 
related legislative oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Readiness: the annual 
authorization for operation and maintenance; the readiness and 
preparedness requirements of the defense establishment; and 
related legislative oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Research and Development: the 
annual authorization for military research and development and 
related legislative oversight.

                        RULE 5. COMMITTEE PANELS

    (a) The Chairman may designate a panel of the Committee 
drawn from members of more than one subcommittee to inquire 
into and take testimony on a matter or matters that fall within 
the jurisdiction of more than one subcommittee and to report to 
the Committee.
    (b) No panel so appointed shall continue in existence for 
more than six months. A panel so appointed may, upon the 
expiration of six months, be reappointed by the Chairman.
    (c) No panel so appointed shall have legislative 
jurisdiction.

       RULE 6. REFERENCE OF LEGISLATION AND SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS

    (a) The Chairman shall refer legislation and other matters 
to the appropriate subcommittee or to the full Committee.
    (b) Legislation shall be taken up for hearing only when 
called by the Chairman of the Committee or subcommittee, as 
appropriate, or by a majority of the Committee or subcommittee.
    (c) The Chairman, with approval of a majority vote of a 
quorum of the Committee, shall have authority to discharge a 
subcommittee from consideration of any measure or matter 
referred thereto and have such measure or matter considered by 
the Committee.
    (d) Reports and recommendations of a subcommittee may not 
be considered by the Committee until after the intervention of 
3 calendar days from the time the report is approved by the 
subcommittee and printed hearings thereon are available to the 
members of the Committee, except that this rule may be waived 
by a majority vote of a quorum of the Committee.

          RULE 7. PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT OF HEARINGS AND MEETINGS

    Pursuant to clause 2(g)(3) of rule XI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Chairman of the Committee or of 
any subcommittee or panel shall make public announcement of the 
date, place, and subject matter of any committee, subcommittee 
or panel hearing at least one week before the commencement of 
the hearing. However, if the Chairman of the Committee or of 
any subcommittee or panel, with the concurrence of the ranking 
minority member of the Committee or of any subcommittee or 
panel, determines that there is good cause to begin the hearing 
sooner, or if the Committee subcommittee or panel so determines 
by majority vote, a quorum being present for the transaction of 
business, such chairman shall make the announcement at the 
earliest possible date. Any announcement made under this rule 
shall be promptly published in the Daily Digest and promptly 
entered into the committee scheduling service of the House 
Information Systems.

        RULE 8. BROADCASTING OF COMMITTEE HEARINGS AND MEETINGS

    Clause 3 of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives shall apply to the Committee.

            RULE 9. MEETINGS AND HEARINGS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

    (a) Each hearing and meeting for the transaction of 
business, including the markup of legislation, conducted by the 
Committee or a subcommittee shall be open to the public except 
when the Committee or subcommittee, in open session and with a 
majority being present, determines by rollcall vote that all or 
part of the remainder of that hearing or meeting on that day 
shall be closed to the public because disclosure of testimony, 
evidence, or other matters to be considered would endanger the 
national security, would compromise sensitive law enforcement 
information, or would violate any law or rule of the House of 
Representatives. Notwithstanding the requirements of the 
preceding sentence, a majority of those present, there being in 
attendance no less than two members of the committee or 
subcommittee, may vote to close a hearing or meeting for the 
sole purpose of discussing whether testimony or evidence to be 
received would endanger the national security, would compromise 
sensitive law enforcement information, or would violate any law 
or rule of the House of Representatives. If the decision is to 
close, the vote must be by rollcall vote and in open session, 
there being a majority of the Committee or subcommittee 
present.
    (b) Whenever it is asserted that the evidence or testimony 
at a hearing or meeting may tend to defame, degrade, or 
incriminate any person, and notwithstanding the requirements of 
(a) and the provisions of clause 2(g)(2) of rule XI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, such evidence or 
testimony shall be presented in closed session, if by a 
majority vote of those present, there being in attendance no 
less than two members of the Committee or subcommittee, the 
Committee or subcommittee determines that such evidence may 
tend to defame, degrade or incriminate any person. A majority 
of those present, there being in attendance no less than two 
members of the Committee or subcommittee, may also vote to 
close the hearing or meeting for the sole purpose discussing 
whether evidence or testimony to be received would tend to 
defame, degrade or incriminate any person. The Committee or 
subcommittee shall proceed to receive such testimony in open 
session only if a majority of the members of the Committee or 
subcommittee, a majority being present, determine that such 
evidence or testimony will not tend to defame, degrade or 
incriminate any person.
    (c) Notwithstanding the foregoing, and with the approval of 
the Chairman, each member of the Committee may designate by 
letter to the Chairman, a member of that member's personal 
staff with Top Secret security clearance to attend hearings of 
the Committee, or that member's subcommittee(s) which have been 
closed under the provisions of rule 9(a) above for national 
security purposes for the taking of testimony: Provided, That 
such staff member's attendance at such hearings is subject to 
the approval of the Committee or subcommittee as dictated by 
national security requirements at the time: Provided further, 
That this paragraph addresses hearings only and not briefings 
or meetings held under the provisions of paragraph (a) of this 
rule; and Provided further, That the attainment of any security 
clearances involved is the responsibility of individual 
members.
    (d) Pursuant to clause 2(g)(2) of rule XI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, no member may be excluded from 
nonparticipatory attendance at any hearing of the Committee or 
a subcommittee, unless the House of Representatives shall by 
majority vote authorize the Committee or subcommittee, for 
purposes of a particular series of hearings on a particular 
article of legislation or on a particular subject of 
investigation, to close its hearings to members by the same 
procedures designated in this rule for closing hearings to the 
public: Provided, however, That the Committee or the 
subcommittee may by the same procedure vote to close up to 5 
additional consecutive days of hearings.

                            RULE 10. QUORUM

    (a) For purposes of taking testimony and receiving 
evidence, two Members shall constitute a quorum.
    (b) One-third of the Members of the Committee or 
subcommittee shall constitute a quorum for taking any action, 
with the following exceptions, in which case a majority of the 
Committee or subcommittee shall constitute a quorum:
          (1) Reporting a measure or recommendation;
          (2) Closing committee or subcommittee meetings and 
        hearings to the public; and
          (3) Authorizing the issuance of subpoenas.
    (c) No measure or recommendation shall be reported to the 
House of Representatives unless a majority of the Committee is 
actually present.

                     RULE 11. THE FIVE-MINUTE RULE

    (a) The time any one member may address the Committee or 
subcommittee on any measure or matter under consideration shall 
not exceed 5 minutes and then only when the member has been 
recognized by the Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as 
appropriate, except that this time limit may be exceeded by 
unanimous consent. Any member, upon request, shall be 
recognized for not to exceed 5 minutes to address the Committee 
or subcommittee on behalf of an amendment which the member has 
offered to any pending bill or resolution.
    (b) Members present at a meeting of the Committee or 
subcommittee when a meeting is originally convened will be 
recognized by the Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as 
appropriate, in order of seniority. Those members arriving 
subsequently will be recognized in order of their arrival. 
Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Chairman and the ranking 
minority member will take precedence upon their arrival. In 
recognizing members to question witnesses in this fashion, the 
Chairman shall take into consideration the ratio of the 
majority to minority members present and shall establish the 
order of recognition for questioning in such a manner as not to 
disadvantage the members of the majority.

                      RULE 12. SUBPOENA AUTHORITY

    (a) For the purpose of carrying out any of its functions 
and duties under rules X and XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee and any subcommittee is 
authorized (subject to subparagraph (b)(1) of this paragraph):
          (1) to sit and act at such times and places within 
        the United States, whether the House is in session, has 
        recessed, or has adjourned, and to hold hearings, and
          (2) to require by subpoena, or otherwise, the 
        attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the 
        production of such books, records, correspondence, 
        memorandums, papers and documents as it deems 
        necessary. The Chairman of the Committee, or any member 
        designated by the Chairman, may administer oaths to any 
        witness.
    (b)(1) A subpoena may be authorized and issued by the 
Committee, or any subcommittee with the concurrence of the full 
Committee Chairman, under subparagraph (a)(2) in the conduct of 
any investigation, or series of investigations or activities, 
only when authorized by a majority of the members voting, a 
majority of the Committee or subcommittee being present. 
Authorized subpoenas shall be signed only by the Chairman, or 
by any member designated by the Chairman.
    (2) Pursuant to clause 2(m) of rule XI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, compliance with any subpoena issued 
by the Committee or any subcommittee under subparagraph (a)(2) 
may be enforced only as authorized or directed by the House.
    (c) No witness served with a subpoena by the Committee 
shall be required against his or her will to be photographed at 
any hearing or to give evidence or testimony while the 
broadcasting of that hearing, by radio or television, is being 
conducted. At the request of any such witness who does not wish 
to be subjected to radio, television, or still photography 
coverage, all lenses shall be covered and all microphones used 
for coverage turned off. This subparagraph is supplementary to 
clause 2(k)(5) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, relating to the protection of the rights of 
witnesses.

                      RULE 13. WITNESS STATEMENTS

    (a) Any prepared statement to be presented by a witness to 
the Committee or a subcommittee shall be submitted to the 
Committee or subcommittee at least 48 hours in advance of 
presentation and shall be distributed to all members of the 
Committee or subcommittee at least 24 hours in advance of 
delivery. If a prepared statement contains security information 
bearing a classification of secret or higher, the statement 
shall be made available in the Committee rooms to all members 
of the Committee or subcommittee at least 24 hours in advance 
of delivery; however, no such statement shall be removed from 
the Committee offices. The requirement of this rule may be 
waived by a majority vote of a quorum of the Committee or 
subcommittee, as appropriate.
    (b) The Committee and each subcommittee shall require each 
witness who is to appear before it to file with the Committee 
in advance of his or her appearance a written statement of the 
proposed testimony and to limit the oral presentation at such 
appearance to a brief summary of his or her argument.

               RULE 14. ADMINISTERING OATHS TO WITNESSES

    (a) The Chairman, or any member designated by the Chairman, 
may administer oaths to any witness.
    (b) Witnesses, when sworn, shall subscribe to the following 
oath:

          Do you solemnly swear (or affirm) that the testimony 
        you will give before this Committee (or subcommittee) 
        in the matters now under consideration will be the 
        truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so 
        help you God?

                   RULE 15. QUESTIONING OF WITNESSES

    (a) When a witness is before the Committee or a 
subcommittee, members of the Committee or subcommittee may put 
questions to the witness only when they have been recognized by 
the Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as appropriate, for that 
purpose.
    (b) Members of the Committee or subcommittee who so desire 
shall have not to exceed 5 minutes to interrogate each witness 
until such time as each member has had an opportunity to 
interrogate such witness; thereafter, additional time for 
questioning witnesses by members is discretionary with the 
Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as appropriate.
    (c) Questions put to witnesses before the Committee or 
subcommittee shall be pertinent to the measure or matter that 
may be before the Committee or subcommittee for consideration.

         RULE 16. PUBLICATION OF COMMITTEE HEARINGS AND MARKUPS

    The transcripts of those hearings and mark-ups conducted by 
the Committee or a subcommittee which are decided to be 
officially published will be published in verbatim form, with 
the material requested for the record inserted at that place 
requested, or at the end of the record, as appropriate. Any 
requests to correct any errors, other than those in 
transcription, or disputed errors in transcription, will be 
appended to the record, and the appropriate place where the 
change is requested will be footnoted.

                     RULE 17. VOTING AND ROLLCALLS

    (a) Voting on a measure or matter may be by rollcall vote, 
division vote, voice vote, or unanimous consent.
    (b) A rollcall of the members may be had upon the request 
of one-fifth of a quorum present.
    (c) No vote by any member of the Committee or a 
subcommittee with respect to any measure or matter may be cast 
by proxy.
    (d) In the event of a vote or votes, when a member is in 
attendance at any other Committee, subcommittee, or conference 
committee meeting during that time, the necessary absence of 
that member shall be so recorded in the rollcall record, upon 
timely notification to the Chairman by that member.

                         RULE 18. PRIVATE BILLS

    No private bill may be reported by the Committee if there 
are two or more dissenting votes. Private bills so rejected by 
the Committee may not be reconsidered during the same Congress 
unless new evidence sufficient to justify a new hearing has 
been presented to the Congress.

                       RULE 19. COMMITTEE REPORTS

     (a) If, at the time of approval of any measure or matter 
by the Committee, any member of the Committee gives timely 
notice of intention to file supplemental, minority, additional 
or dissenting views, that member shall be entitled to not less 
than 3 calendar days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal 
holidays) in which to file such views, in writing and signed by 
that member, with the staff director of the Committee. All such 
views so filed by one or more members of the Committee shall be 
included within, and shall be a part of, the report filed by 
the Committee with respect to that measure or matter.
    (b) With respect to each rollcall vote on a motion to 
report any measure or matter, and on any amendment offered to 
the measure or matter, the total number of votes cast for and 
against, the names of those voting for and against, and a brief 
description of the question, shall be included in the committee 
report on the measure or matter.

                        RULE 20. POINTS OF ORDER

    No point of order shall lie with respect to any measure 
reported by the Committee or any subcommittee on the ground 
that hearings on such measure were not conducted in accordance 
with the provisions of the rules of the Committee; except that 
a point of order on that ground may be made by any member of 
the Committee or subcommittee which reported the measure if, in 
the Committee or subcommittee, such point of order was (a) 
timely made and (b) improperly overruled or not properly 
considered.

           RULE 21. PUBLIC INSPECTION OF COMMITTEE ROLLCALLS

     The result of each rollcall in any meeting of the 
Committee shall be made available by the Committee for 
inspection by the public at reasonable times in the offices of 
the Committee. Information so available for public inspection 
shall include a description of the amendment, motion, order, or 
other proposition and the name of each member voting for and 
each member voting against such amendment, motion, order, or 
proposition and the names of those members present but not 
voting.

          RULE 22. PROTECTION OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION

    (a) All national security information bearing a 
classification of secret or higher which has been received by 
the Committee or a subcommittee shall be deemed to have been 
received in executive session and shall be given appropriate 
safekeeping.
    (b) The Chairman of the Committee shall, with the approval 
of a majority of the Committee, establish such procedures as in 
his judgment may be necessary to prevent the unauthorized 
disclosure of any national security information received 
classified as secret or higher. Such procedures shall, however, 
ensure access to this information by any member of the 
Committee or any other Member of the House of Representatives 
who has requested the opportunity to review such material.

                      RULE 23. COMMITTEE STAFFING

    The staffing of the Committee and the standing 
subcommittees shall be subject to the rules of the House of 
Representatives.

                       RULE 24. COMMITTEE RECORDS

    The records of the Committee at the National Archives and 
Records Administration shall be made available for public use 
in accordance with rule XXXVI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives. The Chairman shall notify the ranking minority 
member of any decision, pursuant to clause 3(b)(3) or clause 
4(b) of rule XXXVI, to withhold a record otherwise available, 
and the matter shall be presented to the Committee for a 
determination on the written request of any member of the 
Committee.

               RULE 25. INVESTIGATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES

    Clause 2(k) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives shall apply to the Committee.
   COMPOSITION OF THE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY--104TH CONGRESS

    Pursuant to H. Res. 11, election of majority members, and 
H. Res. 12, election of minority members (adopted January 4, 
1995), the following members served on the Committee on 
National Security in the 104th Congress:
 FLOYD D. SPENCE, South Carolina, 
             Chairman
RONALD V. DELLUMS, California        BOB STUMP, Arizona, Vice Chairman
G.V. (SONNY) MONTGOMERY, Mississippi DUNCAN HUNTER, California
PATRICIA SCHROEDER, Colorado         JOHN R. KASICH, Ohio
IKE SKELTON, Missouri                HERBERT H. BATEMAN, Virginia
NORMAN SISISKY, Virginia             JAMES V. HANSEN, Utah
JOHN M. SPRATT, Jr., South Carolina  CURT WELDON, Pennsylvania
SOLOMON P. ORTIZ, Texas              ROBERT K. DORNAN, California
OWEN PICKETT, Virginia               JOEL HEFLEY, Colorado
LANE EVANS, Illinois                 JIM SAXTON, New Jersey
JOHN TANNER, Tennessee               RANDY ``DUKE'' CUNNINGHAM, 
GLEN BROWDER, Alabama                California
GENE TAYLOR, Mississippi             STEVE BUYER, Indiana
NEIL ABERCROMBIE, Hawaii             PETER G. TORKILDSEN, Massachusetts
CHET EDWARDS, Texas                  TILLIE K. FOWLER, Florida
FRANK TEJEDA, Texas                  JOHN M. McHUGH, New York
MARTIN T. MEEHAN, Massachusetts      JAMES TALENT, Missouri
ROBERT A. UNDERWOOD, Guam            TERRY EVERETT, Alabama
JANE HARMAN, California              ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland
PAUL McHALE, Pennsylvania            HOWARD ``BUCK'' McKEON, California
PETE GEREN, Texas                    RON LEWIS, Kentucky
PETE PETERSON, Florida               J.C. WATTS, Jr., Oklahoma
WILLIAM J. JEFFERSON, Louisiana      MAC THORNBERRY, Texas
ROSA L. DeLAURO, Connecticut         JOHN N. HOSTETTLER, Indiana
MIKE WARD, Kentucky                  SAXBY CHAMBLISS, Georgia
PATRICK J. KENNEDY, Rhode Island     VAN HILLEARY, Tennessee
                                     JOE SCARBOROUGH, Florida
                                     WALTER B. JONES, Jr., North 
                                     Carolina
                                     JAMES B. LONGLEY, Jr., Maine
                                     TODD TIAHRT, Kansas
                                     RICHARD ``DOC'' HASTINGS, 
                                     Washington

  SUBCOMMITTEES OF THE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY--104TH CONGRESS

    The following subcommittees were established at the 
committee's organizational meeting on January 10, 1995:

           Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Military 
construction; real estate acquisitions and disposals; housing 
and support; base closure; and related legislative oversight.
       Mr. HEFLEY, Chairman
Mr. ORTIZ                            Mr. McHUGH
Mr. MONTGOMERY                       Mr. HOSTETTLER
Mr. BROWDER                          Mr. HILLEARY
Mr. ABERCROMBIE                      Mr. JONES, Vice Chairman
Mr. TEJEDA                           Mr. STUMP
Mr. UNDERWOOD                        Mr. HUNTER
Mr. PETERSON                         Mr. HANSEN
Mr. WARD                             Mr. SAXTON
                                     Mrs. FOWLER

                    Military Personnel Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Military forces 
and authorized strengths; integration of active and reserve 
components; military personnel policy; compensation and other 
benefits; and related legislative oversight.
       Mr. DORNAN, Chairman
Mr. PICKETT                          Mr. BUYER
Mr. MONTGOMERY                       Mr. LEWIS
Mr. SKELTON                          Mr. WATTS, Vice Chairman
Ms. HARMON                           Mr. THORNBERRY
Mr. JEFFERSON \1\                    Mr. CHAMBLISS
Ms. DeLAURO                          Mr. TIAHRT
Mr. WARD                             Mr. HASTINGS
Mr. PETERSON \2\                     Mr. HUNTER
                               __________
\1\ Mr. Jefferson resigned from the Military Personnel Subcommittee on 
May 24, 1995.
\2\ Mr. Peterson was assigned to the Military Personnel Subcommittee on 
February 28, 1996.

                   Military Procurement Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Annual 
authorization for procurement of military weapon systems and 
components thereof, including full-scale development and 
systems transition; military application of nuclear energy; and 
related legislative oversight.
       Mr. HUNTER, Chairman
Mr. SKELTON                          Mr. SPENCE
Mr. DELLUMS                          Mr. STUMP
Mr. SISISKY                          Mr. SAXTON
Mr. EVANS                            Mr. BUYER
Mr. TANNER                           Mr. TORKILDSEN
Mr. TAYLOR                           Mr. TALENT
Mr. ABERCROMBIE                      Mr. EVERETT
Mr. EDWARDS                          Mr. BARTLETT, Vice Chairman
Mr. GEREN                            Mr. McKEON
Mr. PETERSON                         Mr. LEWIS
Mr. JEFFERSON                        Mr. WATTS
Ms. DeLAURO                          Mr. THORNBERRY
                                     Mr. CHAMBLISS
                                     Mr. LONGLEY

                    Military Readiness Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Annual 
authorization for operation and maintenance; the readiness and 
preparedness requirements of the defense establishment; and 
related legislative oversight.
       Mr. BATEMAN, Chairman
Mr. SISISKY                          Mr. KASICH
Mr. SPRATT                           Mr. CUNNINGHAM
Mr. PICKETT                          Mrs. FOWLER, Vice Chairman
Mr. EVANS                            Mr. SCARBOROUGH
Mr. BROWDER                          Mr. WELDON
Mr. EDWARDS                          Mr. TORKILDSEN
Mr. TEJEDA                           Mr. TALENT
Mr. MEEHAN                           Mr. EVERETT
Mr. McHALE                           Mr. BARTLETT
                                     Mr. McKEON

             Military Research and Development Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Annual 
authorization for military research and development and related 
legislative oversight.
       Mr. WELDON, Chairman
Mr. SPRATT                           Mr. HANSEN
Mrs. SCHROEDER                       Mr. TIAHRT
Mr. ORTIZ                            Mr. HASTINGS, Vice Chairman
Mr. TANNER                           Mr. KASICH
Mr. TAYLOR                           Mr. BATEMAN
Mr. MEEHAN                           Mr. DORNAN
Mr. UNDERWOOD                        Mr. HEFLEY
Ms. HARMAN                           Mr. CUNNINGHAM
Mr. McHALE                           Mr. McHUGH
Mr. GEREN                            Mr. HOSTETTLER
Mr. KENNEDY                          Mr. HILLEARY
                                     Mr. SCARBOROUGH
                                     Mr. JONES
                         FULL COMMITTEE PANELS

    The following full committee panels were appointed during 
the 104th Congress (appointed February 13, 1995; reappointed 
August 11, 1995; February 20, 1996; and June 17, 1996):

       Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation

    Purpose--Oversight responsibility for all aspects of 
nonappropriated fund activities, including appropriated funding 
in support of those activities, within the Department of 
Defense, including commissaries, exchanges, clubs and related 
activities.

       Mr. McHUGH, Chairman
Mr. BROWDER                          Mr. CHAMBLISS, Vice Chairman
Mr. SISISKY                          Mr. STUMP
Mr. ORTIZ                            Mr. BATEMAN
Mr. PICKETT                          Mr. WATTS
Mr. TANNER                           Mr. SCARBOROUGH
Mr. UNDERWOOD                        Mr. JONES
                                       (vacancy)

             Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine

    Purpose--Oversight responsibility for all issues, including 
funding, related to the national security aspects of the 
Merchant Marine.
       Mr. BATEMAN, Chairman
Mr. TAYLOR                           Mr. CUNNINGHAM, Vice Chairman
Mr. PICKETT                          Mr. HUNTER
Mr. ABERCROMBIE                      Mr. WELDON
Ms. HARMAN                           Mr. SAXTON
Mr. KENNEDY                          Mr. SCARBOROUGH
Mr. JEFFERSON \3\                    Mr. LONGLEY
                                     Mrs. FOWLER \4\
                               __________
\3\ Mr. Jefferson was assigned to the Special Oversight Panel on the 
Merchant Marine on May 10, 1995.
\4\ Mrs. Fowler was assigned to the Special Oversight Panel on the 
Merchant Marine on May 10, 1995.
                            COMMITTEE STAFF

    By committee resolution adopted at the organizational 
meeting on January 10, 1995, or by authority of the Chairman, 
the following persons were appointed to the staff of the 
committee during the 104th Congress:
  Andrew K. Ellis, Staff Director
  Robert S. Rangel, Deputy Staff 
             Director
   Henry J. Schweiter, General 
              Counsel
 Nancy Jones, Professional Staff 
  Member (resigned December 31, 
               1996)
  Rita D. Argenta, Professional 
           Staff Member
  Brenda J. Wright, Professional 
           Staff Member
    Kathleen A. Lipovac, Staff 
             Assistant
 Frank A. Barnes, Staff Assistant
  Betty B. Gray, Staff Assistant
 Peggy Cosseboom, Staff Assistant
  Marilyn A. Elrod, Professional 
           Staff Member
  Peter M. Steffes, Professional 
           Staff Member
   Ernest B. Warrington, Staff 
             Assistant
 Diane W. Bowman, Staff Assistant
 Steven A. Thompson, Professional 
           Staff Member
 Michael R. Higgins, Professional 
           Staff Member
 Mary E. Cotten, Staff Assistant 
      (resigned May 31, 1996)
William J. Andahazy, Professional 
Staff Member (resigned August 31, 
               1996)
  Tracy A. Finck, Staff Assistant
 Jean D. Reed, Professional Staff 
              Member
    Stephen O. Rossetti, Jr., 
    Professional Staff Member 
     (resigned March 21, 1996)
     Christopher A. Williams, 
     Professional Staff Member
  Douglas C. Roach, Professional 
           Staff Member
    Martha A. Westwater, Staff 
 Assistant (resigned June 6, 1996)
  Mia C. Zur, Special Assistant 
    (resigned January 18, 1996)
  Robert B. Brauer, Professional 
 Staff Member (resigned December 
             31, 1996)
 George O. Withers, Professional 
           Staff Member
    Sheila A. McDowell, Staff 
             Assistant
 Karen V. Steube, Staff Assistant
Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Professional 
           Staff Member
    Marcella A. Wilding, Staff 
  Assistant (resigned August 4, 
               1996)
  Philip W. Grone, Professional 
           Staff Member
  Andrea K. Aquino, Professional 
    Staff Member (appointed to 
 professional staff March 1, 1996)
      Lee Halterman, Counsel
    Larry G. Shockley, Counsel 
     (resigned April 16, 1995)
 Curtis L. Banks, Staff Assistant 
    (resigned October 18, 1996)
  Dudley L. Tademy, Professional 
           Staff Member
John D. Chapla, Professional Staff 
              Member
  Hugh N. Johnston, Jr., Counsel
 Stephen P. Ansley, Professional 
 Staff Member (appointed February 
             1, 1995)
 Donna L. Hoffmeier, Professional 
 Staff Member (appointed February 
             1, 1995)
Douglas H. Necessary, Professional 
 Staff Member (appointed February 
             1, 1995)
  Philip Peters, Communications 
 Director (appointed February 13, 
 1995; resigned January 31, 1996)
  Dionel M. Aviles, Professional 
 Staff Member (appointed March 1, 
               1995)
 Peter V. Pry, Professional Staff 
 Member (appointed March 1, 1995)
      David J. Trachtenberg, 
    Professional Staff Member 
     (appointed March 1, 1995)
Jason E. Bruzdzinski, Professional 
Staff Member (appointed April 12, 
               1995)
 Thomas M. Donnelly, Professional 
Staff Member (appointed April 24, 
               1995)
    Rebecca J. Anfinson, Staff 
 Assistant (appointed May 8, 1995)
William M. Marsh, Staff Assistant 
     (appointed May 10, 1995)
Maureen P. Cragin, Press Secretary 
     (appointed May 22, 1995)
Laura R. Haas, Executive Assistant 
 to the Staff Director (appointed 
        February 25, 1996)
   Heather L. Hescheles, Staff 
  Assistant (appointed April 9, 
               1996)
    R. Christian Barger, Staff 
  Assistant (appointed April 23, 
               1996)
Roger M. Smith, Professional Staff 
  Member (appointed May 6, 1996)
  B. Ryan Vaart, Press Assistant 
     (appointed June 24, 1996)
Laura M. Billings, Staff Assistant 
     (appointed July 17, 1996)
Bridget M. Keator, Staff Assistant 
   (appointed October 23, 1996)
Peter J. Berry, Professional Staff 
  Member (appointed December 30, 
               1996)
 Robert W. Lauthrop, Professional 
Staff Member (appointed January 1, 
               1996)
                           COMMITTEE MEETINGS

    A total of 146 meetings and briefings were held by the 
Committee on National Security, its subcommittees and panels 
during the 104th Congress. The Committee held 13 joint 
meetings. A breakdown of the meetings and briefings follows:

Full committee....................................................    52
Subcommittees:
    Military Installations and Facilities.........................    14
    Military Personnel............................................    25
    Military Procurement..........................................    24
    Military Readiness............................................    11
    Military Research and Development.............................    22
Full committee panels:
    Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation.....     5
    Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine................     6

                          LEGISLATIVE ACTIONS

                      Legislation Enacted Into Law

                     PUBLIC LAW 104-93 (H.R. 1655)

 To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for intelligence and 
 intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the 
   Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency 
        Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes

    Public Law 104-93 authorizes appropriations and related 
matters for fiscal year 1996 for intelligence and intelligence-
related activities of the United States Government, including 
Department of Defense intelligence-related activities within 
the jurisdiction shared by the Committee on National Security 
and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
    Public Law 104-93 addresses the Community Management 
Account and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and 
Disability System. Among its general provisions is an amendment 
to the National Security Act of 1947, which permits the 
President to impose an economic, cultural, diplomatic or other 
sanction in response to the compromise of an intelligence 
source or method or an ongoing criminal investigation.
    Referred sequentially to the Committee on National Security 
and to the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, the 
Committee on National Security was subsequently discharged from 
further consideration on July 19, 1995. H.R. 1655 passed the 
House on September 13, 1995. The bill was enacted into law 
following conference between the House and Senate in which 
conferees were appointed from the Committee on National 
Security.
    (H. Rept. 104-138; Part I and II; S. 922; H. Rept. 104-427) 
Date of enactment: January 6, 1996.

                      PUBLIC LAW 104-106 (S. 1124)

     To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military 
    activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
    personnel strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other purposes

    Public Law 104-106 authorizes funds totaling 
$265,299,027,000 for national defense functions fiscal year 
1996 and provides a budget authority level of $264,696,642,000.

Division A

    Division A of Public Law 104-106 authorizes funds for 
fiscal year 1996 for the Department of Defense.
    Subtitle A of Title I authorizes $44,878,095,000 for 
procurement of aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked combat 
vehicles, ammunition, and other procurement for the armed 
forces, Defense Agencies and reserve components of the armed 
forces.
    Subtitles B through E of Title I establish additional 
program requirements, restrictions, and limitations, authorize 
transfer of or earmark funds for specified programs for the 
armed forces, including Army helicopter, armored vehicle and 
small arms procurement; Navy ship, weapon and aircraft 
programs; Air Force bomber and tactical programs, as well as 
chemical demilitarization programs.
    Subtitle A of Title II authorizes $35,730,400,000 for 
research, development, test and evaluation for the armed forces 
and the defense agencies, including amounts for basic research 
and development-related matters.
    Subtitle B of Title II establishes certain program 
requirements, restrictions, and limitations on 17 separate 
research and development-related matters.
    Subtitles C through F of Title II address the Ballistic 
Missile Defense Act of 1995, miscellaneous reviews, studies, 
reports and other matters such as cruise missile defense 
initiatives and manufacturing technology.
    Subtitle A of Title III authorizes appropriations for 
operation and maintenance (O&M) and working capital funds for 
the armed forces and defense agencies, the Armed Forces 
Retirement Home, the Civil Air Patrol and for the transfer from 
National Defense Stockpile Transaction Fund.
    Subtitles B through G of Title III address depot-level 
activities, environmental provisions, commissaries and 
nonappropriated fund instrumentalities, miscellaneous reviews, 
studies and reports as well as other matters such as the 
Defense Business Operations Fund and Financial Management 
Training.
    Title IV provides military personnel authorizations for the 
active and reserve forces and for military training student 
loans for fiscal year 1996 and authorizes appropriations of 
$69,191,008,000 for military personnel for fiscal year 1996. 
The end strengths for active duty personnel for fiscal year 
1996 are as follows:
          Army, 495,000
          Navy, 428,340
          Marine Corps, 174,000
          Air Force, 388,200
    The Selected Reserve end strengths for fiscal year 1996 are 
as follows:
          Army National Guard, 373,000
          Army Reserve, 230,000
          Naval Reserve, 98,894
          Marine Corps Reserve, 42,274
          Air National Guard, 112,707
          Air Force Reserve, 73,969
          Coast Guard Reserve, 8,000
    The end strengths for reserves on active duty in support of 
the reserve components for fiscal year 1996 are as follows:
          Army National Guard, 23,390
          Army Reserve, 11,575
          Naval Reserve, 17,587
          Marine Corps Reserve, 2,559
          Air National Guard, 10,066
          Air Force Reserve, 628
    Title V sets military personnel policy, including 
provisions that address officer personnel policy; the reserve 
components; decorations and awards; officer education programs 
and other matters such as Army Ranger training and the HIV-1 
virus.
    Title VI addresses compensation and other personnel 
benefits, including pay and allowances; bonuses and special and 
incentive pays; travel and transportation allowances; retired 
pay, survivor benefits and related matters among other things.
    Title VII contains military health care provisions, 
including health care services; the TRICARE program; uniformed 
services treatment facilities; changes to existing laws 
regarding health care management and other matters such as 
Triservice nursing research.
    Title VIII addresses acquisition policy, acquisition reform 
and other matters such as procurement technical assistance.
    Title IX contains Department of Defense organization and 
management provisions, including organization of the Office of 
the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Requirements Oversight 
Council and financial management concerns such as the Defense 
Modernization Account.
    Title X addresses general provisions relating to financial 
matters; naval vessels and shipyards; counter-drug activities; 
civilian personnel; Department of Defense education programs, 
and other matters.
    Title XI addresses the Uniform Code of Military Justice.
    Title XII contains the Cooperative Threat Reduction Act.
    Title XIII concerns matters relating to other nations 
including humanitarian assistance programs; arms exports and 
military assistance; burdensharing and other cooperative 
activities involving allies and NATO.
    Title XIV addresses arms control matters including 
antipersonnel landmines; ABM treaty violations; as well as the 
Chemical Weapons Convention and START II treaty.
    Title XV contains technical and clerical amendments 
relating to the Reserve Officer Personnel Management Act; 
reflecting name change of Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives; and other miscellaneous amendments.
    Title XVI concerns the corporation for the promotion of 
rifle practice and firearms safety.

Division B

    Division B of Public Law 104-106 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $11,177,009,000 for military construction and 
family housing in support of the active forces, the reserve 
components and the NATO infrastructure program for fiscal year 
1996. In addition Division B contains miscellaneous and general 
provisions that concern military housing privatization 
initiatives; military construction programs and military family 
housing changes; defense base closure and realignment; as well 
as land conveyances--generally and those involving Joliet Army 
Ammunition Plant, Illinois.

Division C

    Division C of Public Law 104-106 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $10,618,200,000 for Department of Energy 
national security programs for fiscal year 1996. Division C 
includes an authorization for the Defense Nuclear Facilities 
Safety Board; the National Defense Stockpile, Naval Petroleum 
Reserves, and the Panama Canal Commission.

Division D

    Division D of Public Law 104-106 addresses Federal 
Acquisition Reform. It contains provisions addressing 
competition; commercial items and additional acquisition reform 
provisions, including elimination of certain certification 
requirements, procurement integrity and acquisition workforce.

Division E

    Division E of Public Law 104-106 addresses information 
technology management reform. Division E defines 
responsibility, process and pilot programs for acquisitions of 
information technology as well as additional information 
resources management matters and procurement protest authority 
of the comptroller general.
    After the President vetoed H.R. 1530, provisions of H.R. 
1530 were incorporated in S. 1124. S. 1124 passed the House, 
amended, by voice vote on January 5, 1996 and was agreed to in 
the Senate by unanimous consent, amended, on January 6, 1996. 
Conferees filed a conference report on January 22, 1996, which 
was agreed to in the House on January 24, 1996, and the Senate 
on January 26, 1996. S. 1124 was signed by the President on 
February 10, 1996.
    (H. Rept. 104-131; S. Rept. 104-112; H. Rept. 104-406; H. 
Doc. 104-155; H. Rept. 104-450; H.N.S.C. 104-3; H.N.S.C. 104-4; 
H.N.S.C. 104-5; H.N.S.C. 104-6; H.N.S.C. 104-7; H.N.S.C. 104-8; 
H.N.S.C. 104-10; H.N.S.C. 104-13) Date of enactment: February 
10, 1996.

                     PUBLIC LAW 104-201 (H.R. 3230)

     To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for military 
    activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
    personnel strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for other purposes

    Public Law 104-201 authorizes funds totaling 
$265,960,520,000 for national defense functions fiscal year 
1997 and provides a budget authority level of $265,576,949,000.

Division A

    Division A of Public Law 104-201 authorizes funds for 
fiscal year 1997 for the Department of Defense.
    Subtitle A of Title I authorizes $45,272,100,000 for 
procurement of aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked combat 
vehicles, ammunition, and other procurement for the armed 
forces, defense agencies and reserve components of the armed 
forces.
    Subtitles B through E of Title I establish additional 
program requirements, restrictions, and limitations, and 
authorize transfer of or earmark funds for specified programs 
for the armed forces including Army Armed Kiowa Warrior 
helicopter and Bradley TOW 2 Test Program sets; Navy attack 
submarine, Penguin missile and T-39N aircraft programs; Air 
Force F-15E and C-17 aircraft programs, and other matters such 
as destruction of existing stockpile of lethal chemical agents 
and munitions.
    Subtitle A of Title II authorizes $37,296,573,000 for 
research, development, test and evaluation for the armed forces 
and the defense agencies, including amounts for basic and 
applied research; dual-use technology programs and Defense 
Special Weapons Agency.
    Subtitle B of Title II establishes certain program 
requirements, restrictions, and limitations on 21 separate 
research and development-related matters.
    Subtitles C through E of Title II address Ballistic Missile 
Defense Programs and other matters such as maintenance and 
repair at Air Force installations and the annual joint 
warfighting science and technology plan.
    Subtitle A of Title III authorizes $89,870,950,000 for 
operation and maintenance (O&M) and $2,065,902,000 for working 
capital funds for the armed forces and defense agencies, 
including the Armed Forces Retirement Home, the Civil Air 
Patrol and the SR-71 contingency reconnaissance force.
    Subtitles B through F of Title III address depot-level 
activities, environmental provisions, commissaries and 
nonappropriated fund instrumentalities, performance of 
functions by private-sector sources.
    Title IV provides military personnel authorizations for the 
active and reserve forces for fiscal year 1997 and authorizes 
appropriations of $70,056,130,000 for military personnel for 
fiscal year 1997. The end strengths for active duty personnel 
for fiscal year 1997 are as follows:
          Army, 495,000
          Navy, 407,318
          Marine Corps, 174,000
          Air Force, 381,100
    The Selected Reserve end strengths for fiscal year 1996 are 
as follows:
          Army National Guard, 366,758
          Army Reserve, 215,179
          Naval Reserve, 96,304
          Marine Corps Reserve, 42,000
          Air National Guard, 109,178
          Air Force Reserve, 73,311
          Coast Guard Reserve, 8,000
    The end strengths for reserves on active duty in support of 
the reserve components for fiscal year 1996 are as follows:
          Army National Guard, 22,798
          Army Reserve, 11,729
          Naval Reserve, 16,603
          Marine Corps Reserve, 2,559
          Air National Guard, 10,403
          Air Force Reserve, 655
    Title V sets military personnel policy, including 
provisions that address officer personnel policy; enlisted 
personnel policy; activation and recall; reserve component 
retirement; officer education programs; decorations and awards, 
commissioned corps of the public health service and other 
matters including hate crimes in the military.
    Title VI addresses compensation and other personnel 
benefits, including pay and allowances; bonuses and special and 
incentive pays; travel and transportation allowances; retired 
pay, survivor benefits and related matters among other things.
    Title VII contains military health care provisions, 
including health care services; the TRICARE program; Uniformed 
Services Treatment Facilities; changes to existing laws 
regarding health care management and other matters such as 
independent research regarding Gulf War Syndrome.
    Title VIII addresses acquisition policy, acquisition 
management and other matters such as procurement technical 
assistance and the Buy American Act.
    Title IX contains Department of Defense organization and 
management provisions, including the White House Communications 
Agency and Force Structure Review.
    Title X addresses general provisions relating to financial 
matters; naval vessels and shipyards; counter-drug activities; 
management of Armed Forces Retirement Home; reports and studies 
such as the annual report on Operation Provide Comfort and 
Operation Enhanced Southern Watch.
    Title XI addresses the establishment and mission of the 
National Imagery and Mapping Agency.
    Title XII addresses reserve forces revitalization.
    Title XIII concerns arms control and related matters 
including counterproliferation activities and the Commission to 
Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States.
    Title XIV addresses defense against weapons of mass 
destruction including domestic preparedness as well as 
interdiction, control and disposition of weapons of mass 
destruction and related materials threatening the United 
States.
    Title XV contains Cooperative Threat Reduction with States 
of Former Soviet Union.
    Title XVI concerns Department of Defense Civilian Personnel 
including matters relating to personnel management, pay and 
allowances.
    Title XVII addresses Federal Employee Travel Reform.
    Title XVIII contains the purpose, powers, restrictions and 
membership of the Federal Charter for the Fleet Reserve 
Association.

Division B

    Division B of Public Law 104-201 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $9,982,311,000 for military construction and 
family housing in support of the active forces, the reserve 
components and the NATO infrastructure program for fiscal year 
1997. In addition, Division B contains miscellaneous and 
general provisions that concern military construction program 
and military family housing changes; defense base closure and 
realignment; land conveyances; and military land withdrawals 
including the El Centro Naval Air Facility Ranges.

Division C

    Division C of Public Law 104-201 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $11,399,543,000 for Department of Energy 
national security programs for fiscal year 1997. Division C 
includes authorization for the Defense Nuclear Environmental 
Cleanup and Management, as well as Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 
Land Withdrawal Act Amendments.
    The Committee on National Security reported H.R. 3230, 
amended, to the House on May 7, 1996 and passed the House, 
amended, on May 15, 1996. On July 10, 1996, the measure passed 
in the Senate, amended, by unanimous consent. After the House 
agreed to a conference report on August 1, 1996, and the Senate 
on September 10, 1996, H.R. 3230 was signed by the President 
and became law on September 23, 1996.
    (H. Rept. 104-563; S. Rept. 104-267; H. Rept. 104-724; 
H.N.S.C. 104-23; H.N.S.C. 104-24; H.N.S.C. 104-25; H.N.S.C. 
104-26; H.N.S.C. 104-27; H.N.S.C. 104-28; H.N.S.C. 104-29; 
H.N.S.C. 104-30; H.N.S.C. 104-31) Date of enactment: September 
23, 1996.

                     public law 104-208 (h.r. 2202)

 To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to improve deterrence of 
 illegal immigration to the United States by increasing border control 
    and investigative personnel, by increasing penalties for alien 
     smuggling and for document fraud, by reforming exclusion and 
 deportation law and procedures, by improving the verification system 
 for eligibility of employment, and through other measures, to reform 
  the legal immigration system and facilitate legal entries into the 
                 United States, and for other purposes

    Referred to several committees, the Committee on National 
Security was discharged from consideration on March 8, 1996. 
H.R. 2202 was passed in the House on March 21, 1996 and after 
passage in the Senate, the House agreed to a Conference Report 
on September 25, 1996. Following this House action, a cloture 
motion on the conference report was presented in the Senate. 
H.R. 2202 was ultimately incorporated in Public Law 104-208, 
Making Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations for Fiscal Year 
1997.
    (H. Rept. 104-469, Parts I, II, III, and IV; S. 1894)

                     public law 104-239 (h.r. 1350)

To amend the merchant Marine Act, 1936 to revitalize the United States-
              flag merchant marine, and for other purposes

    Public Law 104-201 authorizes a new Maritime Security 
Program to assist in the retention of sufficient U.S. flag 
vessel sealift capacity. The new program conditions financial 
assistance on the requirement that U.S. flag operators make not 
only their vessels available during an activation, but also 
their entire intermodal network.
    H.R. 1350, the Maritime Security Act, was introduced on 
March 29, 1995 and an amendment in the nature of a substitute 
was ordered favorably reported by the Committee on National 
Security on May 24, 1995. On December 6, 1995, H.R. 1350 was 
passed, amended, by the House. The bill was subsequently 
enacted into law following its passage in the Senate without 
amendment.
    (H. Rept. 104-229) Date of enactment: October 8, 1996.

                     public law 104-293 (h.r. 3259)

 To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for intelligence and 
 intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the 
   Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency 
        Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes

    Public Law 104-293 authorizes appropriations and related 
matters for fiscal year 1997 for intelligence and intelligence-
related activities of the United States Government, including 
Department of Defense intelligence-related activities within 
the jurisdiction shared by the Committee on National Security 
and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
    Public Law 104-293 addresses the Community Management 
Account and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and 
Disability System. Among its provisions it establishes the 
Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government 
to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction.
    Referred sequentially to the Committee on National 
Security, the committee was subsequently discharged from 
further consideration on May 16, 1996. H.R. 3259 passed the 
House on May 22, 1996. The bill was enacted into law following 
conference between the House and Senate in which conferees were 
appointed from the Committee on National Security.
    (H. Rept. 104-578, Part I; S. 1718; H. Rept. 104-832) Date 
of enactment: October 11, 1996.

                  Legislation Vetoed by the President

                               h.r. 1530

     To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military 
    activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
    personnel strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other purposes

    H.R. 1530 was referred to the Committee on National 
Security and ordered to be reported, amended, on May 24, 1995. 
Following passage in the House on June 15, 1995, the Senate 
passed H.R. 1530 on September 6, 1995. The Conference Report 
passed the House on December 15, 1995 and the Senate on 
December 19, 1995.
    On December 28, 1995, the President vetoed H.R. 1530, 
citing that the legislation would restrict his ability to 
implement national security programs and objectives, as well as 
limit his authority as Commander in Chief with regards to 
foreign affairs. Following this action, the House 
reconsideration of the President's veto failed on January 3, 
1996. (see Public Law 104-106 for further discussion).
    (H. Rept. 104-131; S. Rept. 104-112; H. Rept. 104-406; H. 
Doc. 104-155; H. Rept. 104-450; H.N.S.C. 104-3; H.N.S.C. 104-4; 
H.N.S.C. 104-5; H.N.S.C. 104-6; H.N.S.C. 104-7; H.N.S.C. 104-8; 
H.N.S.C. 104-10; H.N.S.C. 104-13)

                  Legislation Reported But Not Enacted

                            H. CON. RES. 180

 Concurrent Resolution commending the members of the Armed Forces and 
   civilian personnel of the Government who served the United States 
                     faithfully during the Cold War

    H. Con. Res. 180 would have honored the many military 
members and civilian employees of the Department of Defense, 
the intelligence community, the foreign service community, and 
other federal agencies whose personal commitment and sacrifices 
contributed to the victory in the Cold War.
    Referred jointly to the Committee on National Security and 
to the Committees on International Relations and Intelligence 
(Permanent Select), H. Con. Res. 180, was reported, amended, by 
the Committee on National Security on September 12, 1996. H. 
Con. Res. 180 passed the House, amended, under suspension of 
the Rules on September 26, 1996. No further action was taken on 
the resolution.
    (H. Rept. 104-804, Part I)

                            H. CON. RES. 200

    Honoring the victims of the June 25, 1996, Terrorist Bombing in 
                         Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    H. Con. Res. 200, as reported, amended, by the Committee on 
National Security, would have recognized the importance of the 
United States mission in Saudi Arabia, the threat posed by 
global terrorism and would have honored the service and 
sacrifice of those who died or were wounded in the bombing. In 
addition, the resolution would have further extended the 
sympathies of Congress to the families of those who died as a 
result of the terrorist attack.
    The resolution was agreed to in the House, amended, under 
suspension of the Rules, on September 24, 1996. No further 
action was taken on the resolution.
    (H. Rept. 104-805)

                             H.J. RES. 102

   Disapproving the recommendations of the Defense Base Closure and 
                         Realignment Commission

    H.J. Res. 102, after meeting the requirements for a 
resolution of disapproval as provided in section 2908(a) of 
Public Law 101-510, the Defense Base Closure and Realignment 
Act of 1990, would have disapproved the recommendations of the 
Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission (BRAC).
    H.J. Res. 102 was referred to the Committee on National 
Security on July 18, 1995. On July 26, 1995, the committee 
voted to report the resolution adversely to the House. The 
resolution was subsequently rejected in the House on September 
8, 1995.
    (H. Rept. 104-220)

                                 H.R. 7

        To revitalize the national security of the United States

    H.R. 7, as reported by the Committee on National Security, 
would have served as the policy framework to guide the 104th 
Congress through the annual defense authorization and 
appropriation budget process. The bill would have established 
an advisory commission to assess United States military needs 
and would have committed the United States to accelerate the 
development and deployment of theater and national missile 
defense capabilities. Additionally, H.R. 7 sought to restrict 
the deployment of United States forces and to maintain command 
and control by United States personnel of its forces 
participating in United Nations peacekeeping operations. If 
enacted, the bill would have reformed the United Nations 
management practices and reemphasized the commitment of the 
United States to a strong North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
    Having been reported by the Committees on the Budget, 
International Relations, National Security and Intelligence 
(Permanent Select), H.R. 7 passed the House, amended, on 
February 16, 1995. Referred and considered by the Senate 
Committee on Foreign Relations, no further action was taken on 
H.R. 7.
    (H. Rept. 104-18, Parts I, II and III; H.N.S.C. 104-33)

                                H.R. 256

 To withdraw and reserve certain public lands and minerals within the 
      State of Colorado for military uses, and for other purposes

    H.R. 256, introduced as the Fort Carson-Pinon Military 
Lands Withdrawal Act, would have withdrawn from appropriation 
under public land, mining, mineral, geothermal leasing and 
mineral materials disposal laws, and reserves for military use 
by the Army, specified lands at the Fort Carson Military 
Reservation and Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site.
    Following its report from the Committees on National 
Security and Resources, H.R. 256 was passed in the House on 
March 28, 1995. No further action was taken on the measure in 
the Senate. However, provisions of the Fort Carson-Pinon 
Military Lands Withdrawal Act were included in Title 10 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public 
Law 104-201).
    (H. Rept. 104-28, Parts I and II; H. Rept. 104-563; S. 
Rept. 104-267; H. Rept. 104-724)

                               H.R. 1141

 To amend the Act popularly known as the ``Sikes Act'' to enhance fish 
  and wildlife conservation and natural resources management programs

    H.R. 1141 would have enhanced fish and wildlife 
conservation and natural resources management programs on 
military installations. The bill also would have authorized 
appropriations for titles I and II of the Sikes Act through 
fiscal year 1998.
    H.R. 1141 was referred to the Committee on Resources and 
the bill, amended, was reported to the House. The Committee on 
National Security requested and was granted sequential referral 
of H.R. 1141, and subsequently ordered the bill, as amended, 
favorably reported to the House on May 24, 1995. On July 11, 
the House passed H.R. 1141, amended, by voice vote. Referred to 
the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, no 
further action was taken in the Senate on H.R. 1141. Although 
the House-passed National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1997 included the Sikes Act, these provisions were not 
incorporated in Public Law 104-201. (H. Rept. 104-107, Parts I 
and II; H. Rept. 104-563)

                               H.R. 2754

     To approve and implement the OECD Shipbuilding Trade Agreement

    H.R. 2754 would have implemented the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Agreement on 
Shipbuilding, an international agreement designed to eliminate 
shipbuilding subsidies granted by signatory countries either 
directly to shipbuilders or indirectly to ship operators or 
other entities.
    H.R. 2754 was introduced on December 11, 1995, referred to 
the Committee on Ways and Means, and reported by that committee 
on April 18, 1996. The bill was sequentially referred to the 
Committee on National Security, and the committee reported the 
bill favorably to the House, with an amendment in the nature of 
a substitute, on May 30, 1996. The committee amendment 
addressed a number of concerns related to the lack of a 
sufficient time period under the OECD Agreement for United 
States-based shipbuilders to transition from the construction 
of naval vessels to the construction of a combination of 
commercial and naval vessels.
    On June 13, 1996, H.R. 2754 was considered in the House. 
The House adopted the Committee on National Security's 
amendment and passed the bill, as amended, by a vote of 325-
100. The Senate took no action on H.R. 2754 before the 
104<SUP>th Congress adjourned sine die.
    (H. Rept. 104-524, Parts I and II)

                               H.R. 3142

To establish a demonstration project to provide that the Department of 
  Defense may receive Medicare reimbursement for health care services 
 provided for certain Medicare-eligible covered military beneficiaries

    H.R. 3142 would have authorized a demonstration program to 
provide for Medicare reimbursement to the Department of Defense 
(DOD) for health care services to Medicare-eligible 
beneficiaries through the Defense Health Program. The Military 
Personnel Subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 3142 on September 
11, 1996. On September 12, 1996, the Committee on National 
Security ordered the bill reported favorably to the House. No 
further action was taken in the House on H.R. 3142 following 
its report from the House Committee on National Security and 
the Senate Committee on Armed Services.
    (H. Rept. 104-27; S. Rept. 104-267)

                               H.R. 3144

 To establish a United States policy for the development of a national 
             missile defense system, and for other purposes

    H.R. 3144 would have established a United States missile 
defense policy to deploy by the end of 2003 a national missile 
defense system that would be capable of defending the United 
States against ballistic missile attacks; would be augmented 
over time to provide a layered defense against more 
sophisticated threats; and which would not feature an 
offensive-only form of deterrence. If enacted, the legislation 
would have specified the architecture of the national missile 
defense system and established a policy for amending the Anti-
Ballistic Missile Treaty.
    On May 16, 1996, the Committee on National Security ordered 
the bill reported favorably to the House. No further action was 
taken in the House on H.R. 3144 following its report from the 
Committee on National Security on May 16, 1996, and subsequent 
granting of a Rule.
    (H. Rept. 104-583, Part I)

                               H.R. 3237

   To provide for improved management and operation of intelligence 
   activities of the Government by providing for a more corporation 
approach to intelligence, to reorganize the agencies of the Government 
    engaged in intelligence activities so as to provide an improved 
  Intelligence Community for the 21st Century, and for other purposes

    H.R. 3237, the Intelligence Community Act, would have made 
broad structural and organizational reforms to the national 
intelligence community. Specifically, H.R. 3237, as amended by 
the House Committee on National Security, would have: 
established a National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), 
created a second Deputy Director of Central Intelligence 
(DDCI), promoted increased cooperation between the Defense 
Human Intelligence Service (DHS) and the Directorate of 
Operations (DO) of the Central Intelligence Agency, required 
the Director of Central Intelligence and the Secretary of 
Defense to report on the advisability of establishing a 
Director in Military Intelligence, consolidated and streamlined 
intelligence personnel authorities, and appropriately 
recodified the National Security Act of 1947.
    H.R. 3237 was ordered favorably reported by the Committee 
on Intelligence (Permanent Select) on June 13, 1996, and, as 
amended, by the Committee on National Security on July 23, 
1996. The House took no further action on the measure.
    (H. Rept. 104-620, Parts I and II; H.N.S.C. 104-9)

                               H.R. 3308

To amend title 10, United States Code, to limit the placement of United 
States forces under United Nations operational or tactical control, and 
                           for other purposes

    Referred jointly to the Committees on National Security and 
International Relations, H.R. 3308, as reported by the 
Committee on National Security, would have stated congressional 
findings and policy concerning the placement of United States 
Armed Forces under the United Nations (UN) operational or 
tactical control. Specifically, the bill would have prohibited 
Department of Defense funds from being obligated or expended 
for activities of any element of the Armed Forces that is 
placed under UN operational or tactical control pending 
specific Presidential certification. In addition, H.R. 3308 
would have required that members of the Armed Forces be 
informed of their unit's mission and their chain of command.
    On September 5, 1996, the Committee on National Security 
ordered the bill reported favorably to the House, and was 
subsequently referred to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services. No further action was taken on this measure.
    (H. Rept. 104-642, Part I)

                               H.R. 4000

  To amend title 10, United States Code, to restore the provisions of 
  Chapter 76 of that title (relating to missing persons) as in effect 
 before the amendments made by the National Defense Authorization Act 
                          for fiscal year 1997

    H.R. 4000, as reported by the Committee on National 
Security, would have restored provisions of Chapter 76 of title 
10, United States Code (relating to prisoners of war and 
missing in action), that were in effect before the amendment by 
the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1997. 
The legislation would have ensured that missing members of the 
Armed Forces (and those civilian employees accompanying them) 
are fully accounted for by the United States and not declared 
dead over time.
    On September 27, 1996, the Committee on National Security 
ordered the bill, as amended, reported favorably to the House, 
and was subsequently referred to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services. No further action was taken on this measure.
    (H. Rept. 104-806; H.N.S.C. 104-46)

                Legislation Considered but not Reported

                               H.R. 1646

   To revise and reform the statutes governing the organization and 
        management of the reserve components of the Armed Forces

    The Subcommittee on Military Personnel held a hearing on 
March 21, 1996 on H.R. 1646, ``The Reserve Forces 
Revitalization Act of 1995''. Provisions of H.R. 1646 were 
subsequently incorporated in H.R. 3230, as reported by the 
committee on May 17, 1996, and ultimately in Title XII of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public 
Law 104-201).
    (H. Rept. 104-563; S. Rept. 104-267; H. Rept. 104-724)

                               H.R. 1670

     To revise and streamline the acquisition laws of the Federal 
    Government, to reorganize the mechanisms for resolving Federal 
              procurement disputes, and for other purposes

    The Committee on National Security held a joint hearing 
with the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight on H.R. 
1670 on May 25, 1995, as well as a full committee hearing on 
acquisition reform on August 2, 1995. The bill passed the House 
on September 14, 1995, without consideration by the National 
Security Committee, and no action was taken in the Senate on 
H.R. 1670. However, the legislation was incorporated in 
Division D and E of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1996 (Public Law 104-106).
    (H. Rept. 104-222, Part I; H. Rept. 104-131; S. Rept. 104-
112; H. Rept. 104-406; H.Doc. 104-155; H. Rept. 104-450; 
H.N.S.C. 104-35)

                               H.R. 3322

 To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for civilian science 
      activities of the Federal Government, and for other purposes

    The Committee on National Security was officially 
discharged from consideration of H.R. 3322 on May 6, 1996. The 
bill passed the House, as amended, on May 30, 1996. No further 
action was taken on H.R. 3322 prior to adjournment.

                               H.R. 4282

To amend the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 to 
make a technical correction relating to the provision of Department of 
            Defense Assistance to local education agencies.

    Referred jointly to the Committee on Economic and 
Educational Opportunities and to the Committee on National 
Security, both committees were officially discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 4282. The bill passed the House, 
as amended, on September 30, 1996. No further action was taken 
in the Senate on this measure.
                          OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

    The oversight responsibilities of the Committee on National 
Security were conducted primarily within the context of the 
committee's consideration of the annual defense authorization 
bill, which covers the breadth of the operations of the 
Department of Defense (DOD) as well as a significant portion of 
the annual operating budget of the Department of Energy. The 
DOD's roughly $265 billion annual budget involves millions of 
military and civilian personnel, thousands of facilities, and 
hundreds of agencies, departments, and commands located 
throughout the world.
    Additionally, H. Res. 5, adopted by the House on January 4, 
1995, granted the Committee on National Security additional 
legislative and oversight authority over merchant marine 
academies, national security aspects of merchant marine policy 
and programs, and interoceanic canals. H. Res. 5 also codified 
the existing jurisdiction of the committee over tactical 
intelligence matters and the intelligence related activities of 
the Department of Defense. These additional oversight matters 
were similarly covered during the course of the committee's 
authorization and legislative activities.

                       Summary of Oversight Plan

    The committee continued its oversight and assessment of 
threats to U.S. national security and U.S. interests and the 
preparedness of the U.S. armed forces to address these threats. 
Throughout the 104th Congress, the committee received 
classified and unclassified briefings on the international 
threat environment. In consideration of the fiscal years 1996 
and 1997 defense budget requests, the committee conducted 
appropriate oversight hearings with the Secretary of Defense, 
the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the individual 
service Secretaries and Chiefs of Staff, regional Commanders-
in-Chief, other officials of the Department of Defense and the 
military departments, officials of the Central Intelligence 
Agency and other defense-related intelligence agencies, and 
officials of the Department of Energy.
    While most of the committee's oversight agenda was designed 
to serve primarily in support of the annual authorization bill, 
much of the committee's most demanding oversight activity was 
event-driven and not subject to prior planning.

                      Actions and Recommendations

    The following specific areas and subjects were designated 
for special attention during the 104th Congress:

                     READINESS AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    A primary focus of the committee during the 104th Congress 
was the readiness of the armed services and the adequacy of the 
Administration's defense spending priorities to support 
sustained readiness and modernization of our military forces. 
The committee took a comprehensive approach to begin addressing 
both short and long-term readiness problems by applying 
additional funds to key readiness accounts while protecting 
core readiness accounts from the diversion of funds to pay for 
unbudgeted contingency operations. Particular attention was 
paid to quality of life programs supporting military personnel 
and their families and the effect of those programs on military 
readiness.
    Additional attention was given to the following: an 
examination of the current state of readiness and training of 
the armed services; readiness of military forces from a joint 
perspective and the readiness of commanders-in-chief charged 
with warfighting missions; an assessment of the utility of 
current methods of measuring the readiness of military units; a 
continuing examination of the training required for the 
maintenance of a high state of readiness and whether training 
requirements are properly funded; integration of active and 
reserve components; examination of the impact of the high pace 
of deployments on service personnel and their families; officer 
and enlisted recruiting, accessions, promotions, separations, 
and retirements; assessment of pay, compensation, and other 
benefits of military service; assessment of the current quality 
of military health care; examination of family support 
programs, including child care and dependent education; review 
of the current quality and adequacy of the military family 
housing supply; review of the current quality and adequacy of 
barracks, bachelor enlisted quarters, and dormitories; and 
examination of the backlog in the repair and maintenance of the 
military housing supply.
    Particular attention was also given to the oversight of 
Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs including the 
examination of military exchanges and commissaries and 
oversight of nonappropriated fund construction programs and 
other nonappropriated fund instrumentalities. This active 
oversight resulted in a number of initiatives contained in 
National Defense Authorization Acts for Fiscal Years 1996 and 
1997 (Public Laws 104-106 and 104-210). These included allowing 
commissaries, exchanges and MWR activities to contract with 
each other to achieve efficiencies; allowing commissaries and 
exchanges to negotiate directly with private carriers for more 
efficient transportation services; and conducting pilot 
projects to achieve economies of scale by merging MWR 
appropriated fund functions with the nonappropriated fund 
function.

                         MILITARY MODERNIZATION

    Recognizing that the 1991 Persian Gulf War clearly 
demonstrated that maintaining technological superiority on the 
battlefield depends upon a steady investment in research, 
development, and procurement of weapons and equipment, the 
committee devoted particular attention to modernization 
shortfalls in three areas: modernization needs for which there 
were both unfulfilled service requirements and industrial base 
concerns; modernization programs which enhanced the military 
services' ability to field sufficient forces to carry out the 
national military strategy of fighting and winning two nearly 
simultaneous major regional conflicts; and, finally, ensuring 
that future military forces will have the technologically 
advanced capabilities of new weapons systems. Specifically, 
attention was given to the following: examination of projected 
military equipment modernization on military capability; 
evaluation of modernization shortfalls and the effect of not 
funding these shortfalls on warfighting requirements and the 
industrial base; nuclear attack submarine procurement strategy; 
strategic airlift and sealift programs; heavy bomber forces and 
the contribution of additional B-2 bombers to these forces; 
National Guard and Reserve equipment; precision guided 
munitions, ammunition; the chemical stockpile demilitarization 
program; the landmine threat in Bosnia; and fighter and attack 
aircraft as well as the modernization implications stemming 
from Navy F-14/Marine Corps AV-8B aircraft accidents.

                            FORCE STRUCTURE

    The end of the Cold War brought an assumption that the 
demands on U.S. military forces would decline, which 
accelerated ongoing reductions in both military spending and 
personnel, to the point where active duty personnel have been 
reduced by at least one third. The result has been a force 
stretched to the breaking point. To adequately address these 
issues, the committee focused particular attention on the 
following: continuing oversight and examination of the Bottom 
Up Review (BUR), including the strategic and tactical 
assumptions supporting the BUR and the force structure designed 
to support the ability of the United States to fight and win 
two major regional contingencies nearly simultaneously; review 
of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff-Commander-in Chief 
(CJCS-CINC) military requirements, examination of roles and 
missions of the armed services, and their implications for 
modernization requirements and the development of major weapons 
systems.

                       BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE

    The committee placed the highest priority on ensuring that 
the U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense program is well funded, well 
managed and directed toward deployment of modern, highly 
capable systems to protect the American people and our troops 
abroad. Throughout the 104th Congress the committee conducted 
11 hearings, devoting particular oversight attention to current 
plans for conducting research and development on missile 
defense systems; plans for deployment of national missile 
defenses (NMD) and advanced theater missile defenses (TMD) for 
forward deployed U.S. military forces and friendly forces and 
allies; examining the long-range ballistic missile threat to 
the United States--including the controversial National 
Intelligence Estimate on this topic (NIE 95-19)--and the 
requirement for a national missile defense system; ballistic 
missile threats to the United States, specifically related to 
the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, including its 
continued relevance and utility in the post-Cold War world and 
its present and projected impact on national and theater 
missile defense programs.

                  BASE CLOSURE AND REALIGNMENT (BRAC)

    Particular attention was given to the examination of the 
management of the drawdown in defense infrastructure under the 
base closure and realignment process and an assessment of the 
adequacy of estimates provided to Congress on the costs and 
savings associated with base closures and realignments in 1988, 
1991, 1993, and 1995. Specifically, through hearings, member 
and staff work, the committee undertook a thorough examination 
of the impact of base realignment and closure actions on 
affected local communities, including the effects of 
Administration policy and statutory requirements concerning 
base reuse, disposal, and community adjustment assistance. 
These efforts resulted in a number of modifications to the 
statutes governing BRAC, especially in the area of base reuse 
and redevelopment (asset and property disposal, claimancy by 
organizations representing the homeless, environmental 
remediation and restoration, etc.).

                   INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL BASE

    Particular attention was given to the following: assessment 
of current budget and policy priorities on the maintenance of 
the defense industrial and technology base; termination of the 
Technology Reinvestment Project; examination of the current 
defense laboratory system, including an assessment of 
redundancies with private sector laboratories; assessment of 
the role of defense funding for university research in the 
maintenance of the technology base. While the committee 
recognized that many such dual-use programs are worthy of 
federal funding, the committee believed that most would be more 
appropriately funded in other functions of the federal budget. 
These decisions were consistent with the committee's attempt to 
focus DOD's resources on identified shortfalls in traditional 
defense accounts.

                MILITARY APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Particular attention was given to the following: continuing 
modernization and maintenance of U.S. defense nuclear structure 
in support of national security requirements; assessment of 
possible effects of a nuclear test ban, in whole or in part, on 
the safety and security of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; 
examination of the restructuring of the nuclear facility 
workforce; and oversight of organizational issues affecting the 
Department of Energy. The committee released a detailed paper, 
``The Clinton Administration and Stockpile Stewardship: Erosion 
by Design'', that was highly critical of the Clinton 
Administration for not taking the necessary steps to ensure the 
safety and reliability of the nuclear stockpile and long-term 
viability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent. The paper included an 
update on the status of the U.S. scientific and industrial 
infrastructure for maintaining the safety and reliability of 
U.S. nuclear weapons, and Administration plans for future 
nuclear stockpile stewardship in the absence of nuclear 
testing.

                           ACQUISITION REFORM

    Public Law 103-355, the Federal Acquisition Streamlining 
Act of 1994, provided for comprehensive, government-wide reform 
of the federal acquisition process. The Committee on National 
Security, which shares oversight of the defense procurement 
process with the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, 
gave considerable attention to the implementation of Public Law 
103-355 and conducted an assessment of possible further reforms 
in the defense procurement system. The result of this 
assessment led to a second round of comprehensive reforms of 
the federal acquisition system enacted as part of the fiscal 
years 1996 and 1997 defense authorization bills. These reforms 
included: cutting costs and paperwork burdens and improving 
business relationships between government and industry; 
revising the current ``Procurement Integrity'' statutes to 
focus on behavior rather than categories of individuals, 
thereby protecting confidential procurement information by 
prohibiting both the disclosure and receipt of such 
information; eliminating the federal information technology 
procurement authority under the General Services 
Administration; doubling the existing Simplified Acquisition 
Threshold (SAT) for overseas non-combat operations; granting 
expanded authorities to waive or modify certain acquisition 
laws in executing programs designated under the defense 
acquisition pilot program; extending the streamlined 
acquisition and prototyping authority currently available to 
the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to the 
military services; eliminating and modifying defense ``plant 
closings'' laws; and eliminating of government audit 
duplication.

        ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    The committee undertook an examination of the organization 
and management of the Department of Defense, the military 
departments, and the defense agencies with a view to improving 
efficiency and reducing costs. The committee believed that, 
despite declining budgets and shrinking forces, the Pentagon 
has maintained unnecessarily high overhead, antiquated training 
and organizational techniques, and outdated business practices. 
Highlights of the fiscal years 1996 and 1997 Defense 
authorization bills organizational and managerial reforms 
included: mandated reductions in the acquisition workforce; 
reductions in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD); a 
reporting requirement on consolidation, streamlining, and 
downsizing options for each military department's military 
headquarters organization (both uniformed and civilian staff); 
and the establishment of the National Imagery and Mapping 
Agency (NIMA), which will allow DOD to harness, leverage, and 
focus rapid technological developments to serve imagery, 
imagery intelligence, and geospatial information customers.

                    Additional Oversight Activities

                          SAUDI ARABIA BOMBING

    In the wake of the devastating terrorist bombing of the 
Khobar Towers complex in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia that resulted in 
the deaths of 19 American servicemen deployed in support of 
Operation Southern Watch, the committee undertook a detailed 
investigation of the incident, an effort that included the 
dispatch of a staff delegation to the bombing site, a series of 
briefings by DOD and intelligence personnel, a comprehensive 
review of hundreds of documents related to the bombing, and 
other inquiries. As a result of these findings, the committee 
issued a report on the bombing concluding that intelligence, 
organizational, and operational shortcomings contributed to the 
unpreparedness for the tragedy. These activities culminated in 
a hearing to assess the security situation leading up to and 
subsequent to the bombing and exploring the findings of the 
DOD's investigation of the bombing, many of which paralleled 
the findings of the committee. The hearing also reviewed the 
overall security situation within Saudi Arabia and issues 
related to the redeployment of U.S. forces to a more remote 
part of the country. The committee received testimony from the 
Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, and retired Army General Wayne Downing, the Director of 
the Downing Assessment Task Force. This initial investigation 
has raised additional questions about the chain of command, its 
responsibilities, and the adequacy of the legal authority 
granted to operational commanders and is expected to result in 
further oversight activity.

                       U.S. POLICY TOWARD BOSNIA

    During the Second Session of the 104th Congress, the full 
committee held 10 hearings exploring the evolution of U.S. 
policy toward Bosnia and the former Yugoslavia. In addition, a 
number of classified intelligence and operations briefings were 
held as the crisis developed and as U.S. ground forces were 
deployed to Bosnia. The committee participated in a number of 
Congressional fact-finding delegations to the region, and 
prepared a series of reports outlining and analyzing U.S. 
policy toward Bosnia and the Balkans. These activities covered 
every aspect of that policy; among the topics addressed were: 
the Administration's plans to deploy U.S. forces to Bosnia in 
support of NATO peace enforcement operations in the former 
Yugoslavia; the circumstances surrounding the shootdown of an 
American F-16 fighter over Bosnia; a review of the military and 
political situation on the ground in Bosnia, including 
intelligence assessments of the military capabilities and 
deployments of the belligerent parties; military operational 
issues connected to the U.S. force deployment, operations 
within Bosnia, and overall readiness implications of the U.S. 
deployment; the Clinton Administration's main arguments for 
supporting the deployment; the provisions of the Dayton 
agreement and progress in its implementation; the post-election 
prospects for stability in Bosnia; the prospects of ``mission 
creep''; the Administration's exit strategy; and the likelihood 
of U.S. participation in a follow-on multinational peacekeeping 
force.
    As part of its efforts to gain a thorough understanding of 
U.S. policy toward Bosnia and to provide comprehensive 
oversight of U.S. military deployments to the former 
Yugoslavia, the committee received testimony from the Secretary 
of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the 
Secretary of State, Department of Defense officials, the 
intelligence community; former U.S. Ambassadors to Yugoslavia 
and to the United Nations; active and retired U.S. military 
commanders; the former United Nations commander of peacekeeping 
forces in Sarajevo; and other former government officials and 
non-governmental experts.
    These hearings, briefings, reports and staff activities 
formed the basis of Congressional legislative activities with 
regard to Bosnia and are expected to lead to additional 
oversight of budgeting, readiness, operational and strategic 
issues related to the continuing deployment of U.S. forces in 
Bosnia and the Balkans.

     NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE ESTIMATE ON THE BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT

    In response to widespread concerns regarding the analytical 
rigor which was employed in compiling the Administration's 1995 
National Intelligence Estimate (NIE), the committee tasked the 
General Accounting Office (GAO) to research and report on the 
matter. The report, ``Foreign Missile Threats: Analytic 
Soundness of Certain National Intelligence Estimates'' (August 
1996, GAO/NSIAD-96-225), provided a useful contribution to the 
on-going debate by raising legitimate questions about the 
assumptions, methodology, evidence and treatment of alternative 
views in the 1995 NIE. In addition to the GAO report, the 
committee included two provisions in the fiscal year 1997 
Defense authorization bill to address this issue. The first, 
section 1311, directs the Director of Central Intelligence to 
convene a panel of independent, non-government experts to 
review the 1995 NIE. The second, subtitle B of title 13, 
directs the establishment of a commission to report on the 
existing and emerging ballistic missile threat to the United 
States.

                                 CHINA

    As one of several broad policy issues, the committee 
focused on the emergence of China as a rising power and the 
potential security challenge it poses to the United States and 
its interests. Through hearings, staff and member briefings, 
the committee gained a fuller understanding of China's national 
military strategy, the direction of the force modernization 
efforts of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, and the 
overall implications of China's military modernization which 
began in the mid-1980s. In a hearing on China the committee 
received testimony from a panel of leading outside experts on 
these subjects, who underscored China's ascendancy to great 
power status, its continuing development of military power 
projection capabilities, and the likely impacts upon U.S. 
national security interests. As part of the committee's 
comprehensive examination of China's military modernization 
efforts, the committee introduced legislation in 1996 mandating 
that the Department of Defense submit a report to the Congress 
on Chinese military capabilities and non-traditional, non-
linear modernization efforts. The committee also requested 
three investigative reports from the General Accounting Office 
to respectively review the potential national security 
implications arising from DOD initiatives to enhance U.S.-PRC 
military to military relations and cooperation, the sale of 
U.S.-origin dual-use machine tools, and the transfer of state-
of-the-art telecommunications equipment that has both civil and 
military applications. To augment the reports provided by the 
General Accounting Office, and to illustrate China's efforts to 
integrate its civilian and military economic sectors, the 
committee requested that the Congressional Research Service 
produce a report providing a comprehensive examination of 
COSTIND, one of China's main military research and development 
organs, and commission directly responsible to facilitating the 
diversification the output of China's defense-industrial 
sector's production lines. (These initiatives are discussed in 
greater detail in the following section on technology 
transfer). As a follow-up to China's March 1996 ballistic 
missile firings into the Taiwan Strait, and China's 9601 
military exercise which rehearsed an attack on the island of 
Taiwan, the committee co-sponsored a seminar with the 
Congressional Research Service, hosted by the National 
Committee on U.S.-China Relations to consider ``Alternative 
U.S. National Security Strategies for China.'' Also in response 
to these developments, committee members and staff were briefed 
by an outside expert on the status of China's missile 
development programs, air force modernization efforts, and 
current dependency upon foreign technology for military 
modernization goals. Throughout 1996, the committee continually 
protested China's illicit weapons proliferation and repeated 
violation of international obligations, and also repeatedly 
petitioned the Clinton Administration to properly address 
Chinese policies and actions that violated U.S. and 
international law.

                          TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    The committee is concerned that the Administration's 
technology transfer policy has the potential to jeopardize U.S. 
superiority in military technology. In response to committee 
and increasing Congressional interest, the committee addressed 
three specific technology transfer issues: the Administration's 
technology transfer policy toward China, the Export 
Administration Act (EAA), and the proposed sale of 
supercomputers to Russia.
    The committee requested the General Accounting Office and 
the Congressional Research Service to research whether China's 
military is exploiting the existing international technology 
transfer rules or breaking specific agreements and U.S. laws on 
order to modernize more rapidly. The reports (three prepared by 
the General Accounting Office and one by the Congressional 
Research Service) concluded that China has been importing dual-
use technologies from the United States and using them for 
military purposes. The GAO reports found that the 
Administration has not properly enforced U.S. export control 
law, that China's military has exploited vulnerabilities in the 
U.S. export control process and using transferred technologies 
in violation of U.S. export restrictions.
    In accordance with its special oversight obligations with 
respect to international arms control, the committee once again 
acted to ensure that legislative re-writes of the Export 
Administration Act (EAA) appropriately addressed national 
security issues. During the 104th Congress the committee worked 
with the House International Relations Committee in their 
attempt to write a new EAA. While recognizing that the world 
has changed since the original EAA was written, the resulting 
bill contained protections sought by the committee for dual-use 
technologies useful in the production of weapons of mass 
destruction and advanced conventional weaponry. The bill 
crafted by the committee and House International Relations 
passed on the House floor by voice vote.
    Concerned that the Administration was decontrolling 
supercomputer exports for commercial reasons, while 
disregarding the risk of potential adversaries using 
supercomputers in the development and maintenance of nuclear 
weapons, the committee began a monitoring effort in this area 
during the 104th Congress. The committee tasked the 
Administration to report on the potential increase in 
proliferation resulting from the decontrol effort. The 
committee also tasked GAO to review planned exports of 
supercomputers to Russian nuclear weapons labs. GAO found that 
in at least one case, the Russians sought a top-end 
supercomputer to maintain their stockpile of nuclear weapons. 
The committee will continue such monitoring in the 105th 
Congress.

                        u.s. policy toward iraq

    As developments in the Persian Gulf accelerated following 
Iraq's invasion of the Kurdish stronghold of Irbil in northern 
Iraq and the Administration's military retaliatory strike 
against targets south of Baghdad, the committee conducted a 
series of operational and intelligence briefings on the 
evolving political and military situation in Iraq and U.S. 
military activities in the region, followed by hearing on the 
overall situation in Iraq and the Persian Gulf. The hearing 
reviewed the impact of military developments on U.S. operations 
and security goals, including the continued viability of the 
Gulf War coalition to contain Iraq. The committee also focused 
on Iraqi military activities in Kurdistan and southern Iraq and 
the U.S. response.

                   extremist activity in the military

    In the wake of the tragic killings of a black civilian 
couple by three white soldiers from the Army's 82nd Airborne 
Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, committee staff 
conducted two separate fact finding trips to determine the 
extent to which extremist behavior is present in the military. 
In addition to the staff delegations, the committee conducted a 
full committee hearing that focused on the extent to which 
extremist activity directed at racial, ethnic, and religious 
minorities is occurring in the military services; current 
initiatives designed to combat the problem; and DOD initiatives 
to monitor extremist activity in the military and to perform 
oversight of each of the services' actions to prevent. The 
committee received testimony from each of the military services 
Secretaries, the Under Secretary of Defense (Personnel and 
Readiness), and non-governmental experts.

            shootdown of two blackhawk helicopters over iraq

    The committee conducted an in-depth review of the April 14, 
1994, downing of two Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters by Air 
Force F-15 fighters over Northern Iraq. Following the review, a 
hearing was conducted to: examine the causes of the accident 
and assess the effectiveness of the corrective actions with a 
view toward preventing similar accidents in the future; and to 
examine the accident investigation and the judicial and 
punitive actions that followed with a view toward assessing the 
thoroughness of the investigation, the credibility of the 
military legal system, and the sufficiency of the disciplinary 
actions administered. Witnesses included family members of 
those killed in the incident and Air Force officials. During 
the hearing, the Air Force confirmed that a series of new 
actions would be taken against the personnel responsible for 
the incident to ensure that full accountability was achieved. 
Following the hearing, the committee requested that the General 
Accounting Office conduct a review of the incident and the 
judicial and disciplinary actions that followed.

                          persian gulf illness

    In the 104th Congress, committee members became 
increasingly concerned about the possible harmful effects that 
exposure to chemical warfare agents may have caused Persian 
Gulf War veterans, particularly in light of the Department of 
Defense's disclosure in May 1996 that some Persian Gulf War 
veterans may have been exposed to chemical agents during the 
war. As a result, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1997 directs the Secretary of Defense to arrange 
for independent research to determine whether exposure to low 
levels of chemical warfare agents could have caused the wide 
range of symptoms collectively referred to as ``gulf war 
syndrome.'' Furthermore, the act directs the department to 
study the possible health implications of administering a 
``cocktail mix'' of inoculations and using investigational new 
drugs, as was done during the Persian Gulf deployment. In 
including these requirements into the bill, committee members 
expressed their beliefs that the Department of Defense has a 
responsibility to both current military members and former 
members to fully investigate any possible links between 
exposure to chemical agents or the use of combined inoculations 
and illnesses suffered by these members or their offspring.

                                pow-mia

    The committee conducted a series of eight hearings on 
accounting for prisoners of war/missing in action (POWs/MIAs) 
in Southeast Asia and Korea. The committee was concerned that 
DOD procedures for processing of POW/MIA cases were flawed. The 
hearings included analysis of individual POW/MIA cases to 
assess the effectiveness of current and past policy and 
procedures. The four hearings in the first session of the 104th 
Congress led to a comprehensive package of reform measures to 
ensure the accountability of POWs/MIAs that was included in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996. 
Following an additional four hearings in the second session, 
those procedures were amended in the Fiscal Year 1997 Act.
                 
		OTHER ACTIVITIES OF THE FULL COMMITTEE

                            Budget Activity

    On February 24, 1995, the committee forwarded its views and 
estimates regarding the budget for National Defense (function 
050) for fiscal year 1996 to the Committee on the Budget. The 
committee noted that spending constraints associated with 
aggressive deficit reduction efforts would necessarily lead to 
reductions in many discretionary programs, but that spending 
for National Defense should be increased over the amount 
requested by the President. The committee indicated that it 
would focus its budgetary actions on the four primary areas of 
military readiness, force modernization, quality of life for 
service personnel, and streamlining inefficient Department of 
Defense bureaucracies and processes.
    On March 18, 1996, the committee forwarded its views and 
estimates regarding the budget for National Defense (function 
050) for fiscal year 1997 to the Committee on the Budget. The 
committee noted that the President's Budget continued to 
provide inadequate resources for National Defense and, when 
adjusted for inflation, represented a reduction of over six 
percent from fiscal year 1996 funding levels. The committee 
reemphasized that its priorities would build upon the preceding 
year's efforts in the areas of military readiness, force 
modernization, quality of life for service personnel, and 
streamlining inefficient Department of Defense bureaucracies 
and processes. The committee further recommended National 
Defense (function 050) authorization levels of $267.3 billion 
in budget authority and $265.0 billion in outlays.

                        Full Committee Hearings

    The Committee on National Security held numerous hearings 
through the course of the 104th Congress consistent with its 
legislative and oversight roles. Though the clarity of the 
historical threat from the Soviet Union had ceased to exist, 
worldwide power balances, geopolitical structures and the role 
of the United States and its armed forces remained a matter of 
debate and concern to many Americans. Through its hearings, 
actions and oversight, the committee attempted to outline 
proper strategic priorities for the nation and to establish 
benchmarks for assessing the adequacy of U.S. military 
resources to protect and advance American security interests in 
the post-Cold-War world.
    The end of Soviet communism did not bring about the end of 
political conflict or military competition; rather, the post-
Cold-War world has been characterized by regional wars, tribal 
and ethnic conflict, terrorism, the use of weapons of mass 
destruction, as well as the outlines of potential new great 
power conflicts that might directly threaten the United States 
and its interests. Even as the Department of Defense continued 
to have its budget reduced, American troops found themselves 
increasingly employed in a lengthening list of contingency 
peace-keeping, -making, and -enforcing missions around the 
globe. The full committee's hearings addressed these threats, 
trends, and conflicts and assessed the Administration's program 
to meet the challenges they posed. In general, these hearings 
fell into three categories: (1) hearings related directly to 
the annual Defense Authorization process, (2) hearings related 
to ongoing conflicts; (3) hearings focusing on the ability of 
current and emerging great powers to confront U.S. national 
security interests. In addition, the full committee held 
hearings to examine potential Defense Department reforms, 
social forces tearing at the fabric of the armed forces, and to 
honor long-serving members of the National Security Committee 
who retired at the end of the 104th Congress.
    The full committee's overall work was guided by the 
precepts laid out in H.R. 7, the National Security 
Revitalization Act. On January 19, 1995, the committee received 
testimony from the Administration on its defense budget request 
for Fiscal Year 1996. On January 25, 1995, the committee heard 
testimony from outside witnesses with regards to ballistic 
missile defense provisions of H.R. 7. The committee met on 
January 27, 1995, to mark up and report the bill to the House.

                            POSTURE HEARINGS

    Early in each session of the 104th Congress, the committee 
sought and received testimony from Secretary of Defense William 
J. Perry, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General 
John M. Shalikashvili, on the Administration's overall budget 
plan and national security policy. They presented their 
recommendations for the fiscal year. In each of the two 
sessions, the committee also sought and received posture 
statements from all of the service secretaries and chiefs of 
staff.
    In the first session, during deliberations on the Fiscal 
Year 1996 Defense Authorization Bill (H.R. 1530), the committee 
initially heard from Secretary Perry and General Shalikashvili 
on February 8, 1995. They were followed by the uniformed 
service chiefs on February 22, 1995 and the service secretaries 
on May 3, 1995. During the second session, the committee began 
its consideration of the Fiscal Year 1997 National Defense 
Authorization Bill (H.R. 3230) with its first posture hearing 
on March 6, 1996, taking testimony from Secretary Perry and 
General Shalikashvili. On March 8, 1996 the committee received 
posture statements from the service secretaries, followed by a 
hearing March 13, 1996 with the service chiefs. The committee 
concluded the posture hearings on March 27 and 28, 1996, 
hearing from the Joint Requirements Oversight Council regarding 
the Chairman's Program Assessment. This assessment identified 
an annual shortfall in military procurement of approximately 
$20 billion.
    In addition to the views of leaders in the Pentagon, the 
committee also sought during both sessions the perspectives of 
regional commanders-in-chief. On February 23, 1995, the 
committee met to receive testimony from General J.H. Binford 
Peay, commander of United States Central Command (CENTCOM); on 
February 28, 1995, from General Gary Luck, commander of United 
States Forces Korea (USFK) and from Admiral Richard C. Macke, 
commander of United States Pacific Command (PACOM); and on 
March 2, 1995 from General George A. Joulwan, commander of 
United Stated European Command (EUCOM). Finally, on March 8, 
1995, the committee heard from the commander of United States 
Atlantic Command (ACOM), General John Sheehan and United States 
Southern Command (SOCOM), General Barry R. McCaffrey. In 
addition, the committee also heard from retired four-star 
generals and admirals on March 22, 1995, who supplied 
independent assessments of military capabilities and readiness 
of the U.S. armed forces. In the second session, the committee 
heard from the regional commanders-in-chief on March 28, 1996, 
receiving testimony from General Joulwan; General Peay; General 
Luck; Admiral Joseph W. Prueher, the new commander-in-chief of 
PACOM; and Vice Admiral Harold Gehman, deputy commander-in-
chief of ACOM.

                         U.S. TROOP DEPLOYMENTS

    In addition to this first set of hearings directly linked 
to each year's budgets, the committee conducted repeated 
policy, investigation and oversight hearings on potential and 
ongoing United States' troop deployments. Throughout the first 
session of the 104th Congress, the committee held nine open-
session hearings and several closed briefings on the former 
Yugoslavia, principally with regard to Bosnia-Herzegovina. It 
explored the evolution of U.S. policy toward Bosnia and the 
former Yugoslavia, including the Administration's plans to 
deploy U.S. forces to Bosnia in support of NATO peace 
enforcement operations in the former Yugoslavia; the 
circumstances surrounding the shootdown of an American F-16 
fighter over Bosnia; a review of the military and political 
situation on the ground in Bosnia, including intelligence 
assessments of the military capabilities and deployments of the 
warring parties; military operational issues connected to the 
U.S. force deployment, operations within Bosnia, and overall 
readiness implications of the U.S. deployment; the 
Administration's main arguments for supporting the deployment; 
the provisions of the Dayton agreement and progress in its 
implementation; the post-election prospects for stability in 
Bosnia; the prospects of ``mission creep;'' the 
Administration's exit strategy; and the likelihood of U.S. 
participation in a follow-on multinational peacekeeping force.
    As part of its efforts to gain a thorough understanding of 
U.S. policy toward Bosnia and to provide comprehensive 
oversight of U.S. military deployments to the former 
Yugoslavia, the committee received testimony from the Secretary 
of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the 
Secretary of State, Department of Defense officials, the 
intelligence community, former U.S. Ambassadors to Yugoslavia 
and to the United Nations, active and retired U.S. military 
commanders, the former United Nations commander of peacekeeping 
forces in Sarajevo, and other former government officials and 
outside experts.
    The committee concluded hearings on the former Yugoslavia, 
Bosnia-Herzegovina, stemming from the first session, on 
September 25, 1996. The focus was on current and future United 
States policy for Bosnia. It covered the progress of the Dayton 
peace agreement, the status of opposing military forces and the 
political situation within Bosnia. Additional focus was on the 
presidential and parliamentary elections, the prospects of 
``mission creep'', the Administrations exit strategy, and the 
likelihood of participation in a follow-on multinational 
peacekeeping force. Testimony was received by John P. White, 
the Deputy Secretary of Defense, and General Joseph W. Ralston, 
the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    Late in the second session, the full committee convened to 
focus on U.S. policy toward Iraq. In the fall of 1996, Iraqi 
army forces moved against the Kurdish city of Irbil in northern 
Iraq, which had been a semi-official ``safe haven'' for the 
Kurds since the end of the 1990 Persian Gulf War. This action 
resulted in the Administration's launching of retaliatory 
missile strikes against targets south of Baghdad. In a 
September 26, 1996, hearing, the committee met to discuss the 
situation in Iraq and the Persian Gulf. It reviewed the impact 
of military developments on U.S. operations and security goals, 
including the continued viability of the Gulf War coalition to 
contain Iraq. It also focused on Iraqi military activities in 
Kurdistan and southern Iraq and the U.S. response. The 
committee received testimony from a panel of outside experts 
and a panel of Administration witnesses.
    The committee had previously considered Gulf security in 
the wake of the devastating terrorist bombing of the Khobar 
Towers complex in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia that resulted in the 
deaths of 19 American servicemen deployed in support of 
Operation Southern Watch. On September 18, 1996, the committee 
held a hearing to assess the security situation leading up to 
and since the bombing. In light of a committee staff report, 
which concluded that intelligence, organizational, and 
operational shortcomings contributed to the unpreparedness for 
the tragedy, the hearing explored the findings of the 
Department of Defense's investigation of the bombing, many of 
which paralleled the committee's findings. The hearing also 
reviewed the overall security situation within Saudi Arabia, 
and issues related to the redeployment of U.S. forces to a more 
remote part of the country. The committee received testimony 
from Secretary Perry, General Shalikashvili, and retired Army 
General Wayne Downing, the director of the Downing Assessment 
Task Force, appointed by Secretary Perry to conduct the 
department's investigation.

                        BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT

    In addition to examining ongoing crises, the committee 
devoted considerable effort to understanding the larger, 
longer-range threats to U.S. national security interests. 
Primary among these was the threat posed to the American 
homeland, U.S allies and military expeditionary forces by 
ballistic missiles. Early in the second session, the committee 
conducted two hearings on the U.S. ballistic missile defense 
program. The first hearing, on February 28, 1996, examined the 
long-range ballistic missile threat to the United States--
including the recent controversial National Intelligence 
Estimate on this topic (NIE 95-19)--and the requirement for a 
national missile defense system. The second hearing, on March 
14, 1996, also dealt with ballistic missile threats to the 
United States and focused on issues related to the 1972 Anti-
Ballistic Missile Treaty, including its continued relevance and 
utility in the post-Cold War world and its present and 
projected impact on national and theater missile defense 
programs. Witnesses testifying before the Committee included 
current and former intelligence officials and outside experts.

                      emerging and future threats

    In a June 6, 1996, hearing, the committee directly focused 
on the issue of U.S. security interests in the post-Cold War 
world. This session explored issues related to the changed 
security environment since the collapse of the Soviet Union, 
the emergence of China as a rising power, the changing 
geopolitical structure in the Persian Gulf and elsewhere in the 
oil-exporting regions of Central Asia, and addressed the 
inherent dangers associated with international stability from 
failed states, ethnic conflicts, and terrorism.
    This broad strategic view also was framed by more focused 
looks at other regional great powers. On March 20, 1996, the 
committee held a hearing on the potential security challenge 
posed to the United States and its interests by China. At a 
time when the Chinese army was conducting exercises designed to 
demonstrate its growing power projection capabilities, the 
committee attempted to gain a fuller understanding of China's 
national military strategy, the direction of the force 
modernization efforts of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, 
and the implications of China's military modernization. The 
committee received testimony from a panel of leading outside 
experts on these subjects, who underscored China's ascendancy 
to great power status, its continuing development of military 
power projection capabilities, and the likely impacts upon U.S. 
national security interests.
    On June 13, 1996, the eve of Russia's closely contended 
presidential elections, the committee held a hearing on whether 
Russia is now or may in the future become a threat to the 
United States and its allies. The committee explored Russia's 
domestic and foreign policy goals and its strategy for 
achieving those goals. A panel of high-ranking former 
intelligence officials and outside experts examined Russian 
threat perceptions, Russian military doctrine and capabilities, 
and the stability of Russian political and military 
institutions.

                               dod reform

    The full committee also conducted hearings to examine 
various options for making the operations of the Department of 
Defense more efficient and effective. On May 25, 1995, the full 
committee joined with the Committee on Government Reform and 
Oversight to receive testimony on H.R. 1670, The Federal 
Acquisition Reform Act of 1995. The bill was introduced by 
Chairman Floyd Spence of the Committee on National Security and 
Chairman William Clinger of the Committee on Government Reform 
and Oversight. The intent of H.R. 1670 was to initiate 
fundamental government-wide reform of the Federal acquisition 
system. On August 2, 1995, the committee continued its revision 
of Federal Acquisition Policy by receiving additional testimony 
from outside experts, the Office of Management and Budget, and 
the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition Reform. 
The committee's reform efforts also included consideration of 
H.R. 3237, a bill to reorganize the U.S. intelligence 
community.

                             other matters

    On June 25, 1996, the committee held a hearing to learn 
more about extremist activity and race relations in the 
military. Testifying were each of the service secretaries and 
outside experts. Each secretary discussed their efforts in 
determining the extent to which extremist activity directed at 
racial, ethnic and religious minorities is occurring within the 
military services. Additional discussions focused on current 
initiatives designated to combat the problem. The Under 
Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness also provided 
a general overview of the department's efforts to monitor 
extremist activity in the military and what oversight each of 
the services possessed in taking action to prevent it.
    Finally, on September 25, 1996, the committee met to honor 
Members leaving the House of Representatives at the end of the 
104th Congress.
    (H.N.S.C.104-1; H.N.S.C. 104-3; H.N.S.C. 104-9; H.N.S.C. 
104-17; H.N.S.C. 104-23; H.N.S.C. 104-33; H.N.S.C. 104-35; 
H.N.S.C. 104-36; H.N.S.C. 104-37; H.N.S.C. 104-38; H.N.S.C. 
104-39; H.N.S.C. 104-40; H.N.S.C. 104-43; H.N.S.C. 104-44; 
H.N.S.C. 104-45)

       Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation

    The Special Oversight Panel On Morale, Welfare And 
Recreation was appointed for the 104th Congress on February 13, 
1995, and most recently was reappointed on June 17, 1996.
    The panel conducted three hearings under its jurisdiction 
during the 104th Congress. Reviews of the fiscal year 1996 and 
1997 budgets requests for morale, welfare and recreation (MWR) 
programs were conducted on March 29, 1995 and March 27, 1996, 
respectively. The panel continued its oversight of the military 
services' MWR programs and operations of the Defense Commissary 
Agency (DeCA) and the military exchanges. Issues examined 
included the effects of the military drawdown on the morale and 
welfare of our military personnel and the extent to which MWR 
programs served to mitigate drawdown stresses; the impact of 
the drawdown on commissaries and exchanges; the nomination of 
DeCA by the Secretary of Defense to be a performance-based 
organization; and efforts and options for improving 
efficiencies in the operation of commissaries, exchanges and 
MWR activities.
    This active oversight resulted in a number of initiatives 
contained in National Defense Authorization Acts for Fiscal 
Years 1996 and 1997 (Public Laws 104-106 and 104-210). These 
included allowing commissaries, exchanges and MWR activities to 
contract with each other to achieve efficiencies; allowing 
commissaries and exchanges to negotiate directly with private 
carriers for more efficient transportation services; and 
conducting pilot projects to achieve economies of scale by 
merging MWR appropriated fund functions with nonappropriated 
fund function.
    The panel also continued its annual review of the 
commissary surcharge and nonappropriated funded construction 
program.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-10; H.N.S.C. 104-30)

             Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine

    The Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine was 
established on February 13, 1995, and was reappointed on July 
17, 1996. Jurisdiction over the national security aspects of 
the merchant marine, including financial assistance for the 
construction and operation of vessels, the maintenance of the 
U.S. shipbuilding and ship repair industrial base, cabotage, 
cargo preference, and merchant marine officers and seaman were 
transferred from the former Committee on Merchant Marine and 
Fisheries to the Committee on National Security at the 
beginning of the 104th Congress. The Committee on National 
Security also assumed jurisdiction over the U.S. Merchant 
Marine Academy and the six maritime training academies as well 
as annual authorization responsibility for the Panama Canal 
Commission. Matters within the above subjects were assigned to 
the panel for appropriate consideration.
    On March 28, 1995 and April 6, 1995, the panel held two 
days of hearings to address the continuing decline of the U.S. 
flag merchant fleet and its role in the Department of Defense's 
sustainment sealift plans. On the first day of hearings, the 
panel received testimony from the U.S. Maritime Administrator 
and the Commander of the Military Sealift Command. On April 6, 
1995, the panel received testimony from the maritime industry 
and shipboard labor.
    On March 29, 1995, H.R. 1350, the Maritime Security Act was 
introduced and on May 17, 1995, the panel recommended by voice 
vote that a substitute to H.R. 1350 be forwarded to the full 
committee for further consideration. On May 24, 1995, the 
substitute was ordered favorably reported by the House 
Committee on National Security by unanimous voice vote (H. 
Rept. 104-229). On December 6, 1995, H.R. 1350 was passed by 
the House of Representatives after the adoption of an amendment 
offered by the panel's Chairman. On September 24, 1996, the 
Senate passed H.R. 1350 without amendment. H.R. 1350 was signed 
into law by the President on October 8, 1996 (Public Law 104-
239).
    During the March 28, 1995 hearing, the panel also received 
testimony on the budget request for fiscal year 1996 for the 
Panama Canal Commission and on legislative proposals to ease 
the transition of the canal to the government of Panama on 
December 31, 1999. Representatives of the Panama Canal 
Commission and the Departments of Defense and State testified 
on these matters. On May 17, 1995, the panel recommended 
authorization levels for the Panama Canal Commission for fiscal 
year 1996 as well as changes to the Canal Commission organic 
statute. These recommendations were adopted by the Committee on 
National Security on May 24, 1995, and were subsequently 
included in title XXXV of Division C of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (Public Law 104-106).
    On March 5, 1996, the panel held a hearing on the budget 
request for the Maritime Administration and the Panama Canal 
Commission for the fiscal year 1997. On April 24, 1996, the 
panel provided recommendations to the committee on 
authorization levels for the Maritime Administration and for 
the Panama Canal Commission. The panel also provided 
recommendations for additional changes to the Commission's 
organic statute to ease the transition. These recommendations 
were adopted by the House Committee on National Security on May 
1, 1996, by unanimous voice vote. The recommendations with 
respect to the Panama Canal Commission were contained in title 
XXXV of Division C of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public Law 104-201).
    On May 22, 1996, the Special Oversight Panel on the 
Merchant Marine held a hearing to examine the impact of H.R. 
2754, legislation to implement the OECD shipbuilding trade 
agreement which had been introduced on December 11, 1995. The 
Committee on National Security received sequential referral of 
H.R. 2754 and the panel received testimony at a May 22, 1996, 
hearing from members of Congress, the United States Trade 
Representative, a number of large and small U.S. based 
shipbuilders, and U.S. flag vessel operators. On May, 29, 1996, 
the committee agreed to an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute to H.R. 2754 and ordered the bill favorably reported 
to the House (Rept. 104-524, Part 2). On June 6, 1996, the 
Committee on Rules met and agreed to make the amendment in the 
nature of a substitute as recommended by the Committee on Ways 
and Means as the original bill for the purpose of amendment. 
The Committee on National Security substitute was made in order 
as an amendment to the Ways and Means substitute. The House 
agreed to adopt H.R. 2754, as amended, but the Congress did not 
act further on H.R. 2754.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-13; H.N.S.C. 104-31; H.N.S.C. 104-52)
                   OTHER ACTIVITIES OF SUBCOMMITTEES

           Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee

    The Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee held 
several hearings in support of its consideration of the fiscal 
year 1996 and fiscal year 1997 budget request for the military 
construction, military family housing, and other related 
programs of the Department of Defense and the military 
services. In addition to its consideration of the annual budget 
request, the subcommittee considered and reported legislation 
in each session of the 104th Congress which was included in 
division B of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1996 (Public Law 104-106) and the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public Law 104-201). In 
both instances, the legislation included alterations to the 
management of the military construction program and the 
military family housing program, modifications to the defense 
base closure and realignment process, and provisions affecting 
the conveyance, exchange, transfer of jurisdiction, or 
modification to existing statutory authority on the disposition 
of real property. The subcommittee also reported legislation to 
establish the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, to 
reauthorize the Sikes Act, and to provide for military land 
withdrawals at Fort Carson and the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Range 
in the State of Colorado and at El Centro Naval Air Facility in 
the State of California
    The subcommittee took testimony from senior officials of 
the Department of Defense and senior officials and active and 
reserve component officers of the Department of Defense, the 
Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, including 
the Marine Corps, the Department of the Air Force, the General 
Accounting Office, the Air Force Sergeants Association, the 
Fleet Reserve Association, the National Military Family 
Association, the Non-Commissioned Officers Association, the 
Reserve Officers Association, and members of Congress.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-8; H.N.S.C. 104-28)

                        ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    The subcommittee met jointly with the Readiness 
Subcommittee on March 24, 1996 to conduct an oversight hearing 
on the management of environmental remediation and restoration 
by the Department of Defense. The subcommittee took testimony 
from senior officials of the Department of Defense, the 
military departments, the General Accounting Office, and the 
Congressional Budget Office.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-6)

                      BASE CLOSURE AND REALIGNMENT

    The subcommittee met on February 23, 1995 to conduct an 
oversight hearing on the management of the drawdown in defense 
infrastructure under the base closure and realignment process 
and to assess the adequacy of estimates provided to Congress on 
the costs and savings associated with base closure and 
realignment. The subcommittee took testimony from senior 
officials of the Department of Defense and the General 
Accounting Office.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-2)

    FUTURE MILITARY HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS IN THE ROCKY 
                            MOUNTAIN REGION

    The subcommittee met on April 12, 1995, in Aurora, 
Colorado, at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, to conduct an 
oversight hearing on future military construction requirements 
to support the health care needs of military personnel and 
their families and the military retiree community which may be 
required as a result of the closure of the Fitzsimons Army 
Medical Center. The subcommittee took testimony from senior 
officials of the Department of Defense, the Commander of 
Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, elected officials of the City 
of Aurora and the City of Denver, and representatives of the 
Future of Fitzsimons Initiative, the Retired Officers 
Associations, and the Retired Enlisted Association.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-14)

                   PRIVATIZATION OF MILITARY HOUSING

    The subcommittee met on March 7, 1996 to conduct an 
oversight hearing on the implementation by the Department of 
Defense of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative 
(section 2801 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1996 (Public Law 104-106)). The subcommittee took 
testimony from senior officials of the Department of Defense 
and the military departments.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-28)

            recapitalization and modernization of facilities

    During the 104th Congress, the subcommittee conducted a 
series of hearings on the recapitalization and modernization of 
military installations, including the condition of military 
housing for unaccompanied personnel and military families, the 
condition of facilities supporting the operational mission of 
the military services, and the state of basic infrastructure 
such as electrical systems, water, sewage and sanitation, and 
roads. The subcommittee took testimony from senior officials of 
the Department of Defense, senior officials and officers, 
including the senior enlisted officers, of the Department of 
the Army, the Department of the Navy, including the Marine 
Corps, the Department of the Air Force, a panel of military 
spouses, and the National Military Family Association.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-8; H.N.S.C. 104-32)

                    army strategic mobility program

    The subcommittee met on September 12, 1996 to conduct an 
oversight hearing on the adequacy of current defense planning 
to support infrastructure requirements related to the Army 
Strategic Mobility Program. The subcommittee took testimony 
from senior officers of the Department of the Army.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-42)

                    Military Personnel Subcommittee

     The Military Personnel Subcommittee held a series of 
hearings to review the manpower portion of the fiscal years 
1996 and 1997 defense budget requests: March 7, 1995, (joint 
hearing with Military Readiness Subcommittee) readiness and 
personnel issues related to high pace of operations; March 14, 
1995, personnel OPTEMPO; March 16, 1995, quality of life 
issues; March 23, 1995, reserve component issues; March 28, 
1995, TRICARE managed health care program; March 30, 1995, 
wartime vs. peacetime medical requirements; April 4, 1995, 
manning the force; March 7, 1996, Department of Defense TRICARE 
and alternatives for retiree health care; March 12, 1996, 
quality of life issues; March 15, 1996 (field hearing), use of 
military personnel to increase security at U.S. borders; March 
21, 1996, Reserve Forces Revitalization Act of 1995; medicare 
subvention, September 11, 1996; and National Guard Youth 
Challenge Program, September 24, 1996. The subcommittee also 
held a series of eight hearings on accounting for prisoners of 
war/missing in action (POW/MIAs) in Southeast Asia and Korea, 
and one on August 3, 1995, friendly fire shootdown of Army 
helicopters over northern Iraq. Four member briefings were 
held: April 6, 1995, ranger training deaths; February 29, 1996, 
gender performance standards; September 10 and October 1, 1996, 
POW/MIA issues.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-7; H.N.S.C. 104-11; H.N.S.C. 104-12; H.N.S.C. 
104-18; H.N.S.C. 104-19; H.N.S.C. 104-22; H.N.S.C. 104-27; 
H.N.S.C. 104-46; H.N.S.C. 104-47; H.N.S.C. 104-50; H.N.S.C. 
104-51)

                   Military Procurement Subcommittee

     The Subcommittee on Military Procurement conducted 
numerous oversight hearings during the 104th Congress in its 
deliberations of the fiscal years 1996 and 1997 Department of 
Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) budget requests. 
Many of these hearings were held jointly, either with the 
Subcommittee on Military Research and Development or with the 
Subcommittee on Military Readiness.
     Topics for DOD hearings included: modernization shortfalls 
and the effect of not funding these shortfalls on warfighting 
requirements and the industrial base; nuclear attack submarine 
procurement strategy (two hearings); strategic airlift and 
sealift programs; heavy bomber forces and the contribution of 
additional B-2 bombers to these forces (two hearings); the 
chemical stockpile demilitarization program; the landmine 
threat in Bosnia; and modernization implications stemming from 
Navy F-14/Marine Corps AV-8B aircraft accidents.
     Topics for DOE hearings included: an overview of the 
department's budget requests for atomic energy activities (two 
hearings); a review of future plans, programs, and policies for 
nuclear testing, tritium production, and infrastructure 
consolidation/modernization; and a review of environmental 
remediation/management issues.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-4; H.N.S.C. 104-15; H.N.S.C. 104-16; H.N.S.C. 
104-20; H.N.S.C. 104-24; H.N.S.C. 104-29; H.N.S.C. 104-48; 
H.N.S.C. 104-49; H.N.S.C. 104-53; H.N.S.C. 104-54)

                    Military Readiness Subcommittee

    In addition to its review of the operations and maintenance 
portion of the fiscal years 1996 and 1997 Department of Defense 
authorization requests, the subcommittee held a series of 
hearings within its jurisdiction. Major areas of the 
subcommittee's examinations included: readiness and training 
for the armed forces; readiness of military forces from a joint 
perspective and the readiness of commanders in chief charged 
with warfighting missions; efforts to accurately measure, 
assess, and monitor readiness; shortfalls in military readiness 
and their causes; military contingency operations and their 
effect on military readiness; infrastructure reductions and 
other cost reduction issues; civilian personnel management 
within the Department of Defense; financial management and 
improvement shortcomings within the DOD; logistics management 
and computer information management reforms and improvements; 
environmental restoration activities of the DOD; and issues 
concerning the National Defense Stockpile of critical and 
strategic materials.
    In addition, the subcommittee undertook a detailed and 
extensive examination of issues concerning the military depot 
maintenance functions and infrastructure of the Department of 
Defense. In the first session of the 104th Congress, a major 
legislative initiative was developed by the subcommittee to 
permanently change DOD policy for the accomplishment of depot 
maintenance. In the succeeding session, the subcommittee held 
extensive hearings on DOD's response to these policy changes.
    The subcommittee held hearings on the administration's 
proposal to change the operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve 
number 1 located at Elk Hills, California to a public 
corporation. A legislative package was developed by the 
subcommittee for the public sale of this reserve.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-6; H.N.S.C. 104-24; H.N.S.C. 104-26)

             Military Research and Development Subcommittee

    In addition to the traditional oversight hearings held to 
review the fiscal years 1996 and 1997 research and development 
budget request for the Department of Defense during the 104th 
Congress, the Subcommittee on Military Research and Development 
(R&D) participated in series of joint hearings on Ballistic 
Missile Defense with the Military Procurement Subcommittee. The 
subcommittees also examined the recent developments in 
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and ballistic 
missiles, near term national missile defense, and tactical 
aviation modernization.
    During the 104th Congress, the R&D subcommittee also held 
joint hearings on oceanographic capabilities and the disposal 
of radioactive material and other toxic waste in the world's 
oceans and tributaries with the House Science Committee, 
Subcommittee on Energy and Environment.
    The R&D subcommittee also received testimony on detection 
of terrorist threats, safety and survivability, federally 
funded research and development centers, and the chemical-
biological defense program and response to urban terrorism.
    (H.N.S.C. 104-4; H.N.S.C. 104-5; H.N.S.C. 104-21; H.N.S.C. 
104-24; H.N.S.C. 104-25; H.N.S.C. 104-34; H.N.S.C. 104-41; 
H.N.S.C. 104-49; H.N.S.C. 104-54)
                              PUBLICATIONS

         Committee Prints of Laws Relating to National Defense

    To assist individuals in referencing statutes that are 
frequently under consideration by the Committee on National 
Security and the Department of Defense and others in looking 
for statutory guidance, the committee printed three volumes 
pertaining to current law during the 104th Congress.
          Title 10, United States Code--Armed Forces (as 
        amended through December 31, 1996).
          Compilation of Defense-Related Federal Laws (other 
        than title 10, United States Code) (as amended through 
        December 31, 1996).
          Laws Relating to Federal Procurement (as amended 
        through December 31, 1996).
    (Committee Prints 5, 6 and 7)

                            Committee Prints

    1. Committee rules, adopted January 10, 1995.
    2. Title 10, United States Code, Armed Forces (as amended 
through December 31, 1994). March 1995.
    3. Laws relating to federal procurement (as amended through 
December 31, 1994). March 1995.
    4. A ceremony unveiling the portrait of the Honorable Les 
Aspin. July 17, 1996.
    5. Title 10, United States Code, Armed Forces (as amended 
through December 31, 1996). January 1997.
    6. Compilation of Defense-Related Federal Laws (other than 
Title 10, United States Code) (as amended through December 31, 
1996). January 1997.
    7. Laws relating to federal procurement (as amended through 
December 31, 1996). January 1997.

                         Published Proceedings

    H.N.S.C. 104-1--Full committee organization and oversight. 
January 10 and February 14, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-2--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee oversight hearing on base closure and realignment 
process. February 23, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-3--Full committee hearing on H.R. 1530, to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other 
purposes. February 8, 22, 23, 28; March 2, 8, 22; May 3 and 
July 2.
    H.N.S.C. 104-4--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearings 
on Title I--Procurement of H.R. 1530, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other purposes. March 
7, 9, 15, 16, 29, 30 and April 6, 1995. [March 7, 9 and 15 
hearings joint sessions with Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee.]
    H.N.S.C. 104-5--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on Title II--Research and Development of 
H.R. 1530, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for 
military activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe 
military personnel strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for 
other purposes. March 28, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-6--Military Readiness Subcommittee hearings on 
Title III--Operation and Maintenance of H.R. 1530, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other purposes. March 
7, 9, 16, 22, 23 and 24, 1995. [March 24 hearing joint session 
with Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee.]
    H.N.S.C. 104-7--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearings on 
Title IV--Personnel Authorizations, Title V--Military Personnel 
Policy, Title VI--Compensation and Other Personnel Benefits, 
and Title VII--Health Care Provisions of H.R. 1530, to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other 
purposes. March 7, 14, 16, 23, 28, 30; April 4 and May 18, 
1995. [March 7 hearing joint session with Military Readiness 
Subcommittee.]
    H.N.S.C. 104-8--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee hearings on Division B--Military Construction 
Authorizations (H.R. 1529) of H.R. 1530, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1996, and for other purposes. March 
14, 24, 28 and April 4, 1995. [March 24 hearing joint session 
with Readiness Subcommittee and published with Readiness 
Subcommittee volume, H.N.S.C. 104-6.]
    H.N.S.C. 104-9--Full committee hearing on H.R. 3237, 
intelligence reorganization. July 11, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-10--Morale, Welfare and Recreation Special 
Oversight Panel hearings on morale, welfare and recreation and 
commissary issues. March 29 and April 6, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-11--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
friendly fire shootdown of Army helicopters over Northern Iraq 
in April 1994. August 3, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-12--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
accounting for U.S. POW/MIA's in Southeast Asia. June 28, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-13--Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant 
Marine hearings on annual authorization of the Panama Canal 
Commission and annual authorization for the United States 
Maritime Administration. March 28 and April 6, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-14--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee field hearing in Aurora, Colorado, on future 
military health infrastructure requirements in the Rocky 
Mountain region. April 12, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-15--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on B-2 bomber. September 12, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-16--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on the new attack submarine. September 7, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-17--Full committee hearing on United States 
security interests in the Post-Cold-War world. June 6, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-18--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
U.S. and Vietnamese Government knowledge and accountability for 
U.S. POW/MIA's. November 14, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-19--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
Department of Defense's comprehensive review of POW/MIA cases. 
November 20 and 30, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-20--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on chemical stockpile demilitarization program. July 13, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-21--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee and Military Procurement Subcommittee joint 
hearing on response to the landmine threat in Bosnia. January 
24, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-22--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
Department of Defense's comprehensive review of Indochina POW/
MIA cases. December 14, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-23--Full committee hearings on H.R. 3230, to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for other 
purposes. March 6, 8, 13, 27, and 28, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-24--Military Procurement Subcommittee, 
Military Readiness Subcommittee and Military Research and 
Development Subcommittee hearings on Titles I, II and III--
Procurement, Operations and Maintenance, and Research and 
Development of H.R. 3230, to authorize appropriations for 
fiscal year 1997 for military activities of the Department of 
Defense, to prescribe military personnel strengths for fiscal 
year 1997, and for other purposes. March 19, 21, 22 and 29, 
1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-25--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearings on Title II--Research and Development of 
H.R. 3230, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for 
military activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe 
military personnel strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for 
other purposes. March 5 and 12, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-26--Military Readiness Subcommittee hearings 
on Title III--Operation and Maintenance of H.R. 3230, to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for other 
purposes. March 19 and April 16, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-27--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearings 
on Title IV--Personnel Authorizations, Title V--Military 
Personnel Policy, Title VI--Compensation and Other Personnel 
Benefits, and Title VII--Health Care Provisions of H.R. 3230, 
to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for other 
purposes. March 7, 12, 15, 21; September 11 and 24, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-28--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee hearings on Division B--Military Construction 
Authorizations (H.R. 3231) of H.R. 3230, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for other purposes. March 
7, 13, 19, 21 and April 16, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-29--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on Title I--(DOE) Procurement of H.R. 3230, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1997 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1997, and for other purposes. March 
12, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-30--Morale, Welfare and Recreation Special 
Oversight Panel hearing on morale, welfare and recreation and 
commissary issues. March 27, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-31--Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant 
Marine hearings on annual authorization of the Panama Canal 
Commission and annual authorization for the United States 
Maritime Administration. March 5, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-32--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee hearing on military housing and other quality of 
life infrastructure. July 30, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-33--Full committee hearings on H.R. 7, to 
revitalize the national security of the United States. January 
19, 25 and 27, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-34--Subcommittee on Military Research and 
Development joint hearing with Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment and Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife and Oceans 
on leveraging national oceanographic capabilities. January 25, 
1996. [Printed by Committee on Science]
    H.N.S.C. 104-35--Full committee joint hearing with 
Committee on Government Reform and Oversight on H.R. 1670, to 
revise and streamline the acquisition laws of the Federal 
Government, to reorganize the mechanisms for resolving Federal 
procurement disputes, and for other purposes. May 25, 1995. 
[Printed by Committee on Government Reform and Oversight]
    H.N.S.C. 104-36--Full committee hearings on the United 
States policy towards the former Yugoslavia. June 7; July 11; 
October 17, 18; November 2, 8, 15, 30 and December 6, 1995; 
September 25, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-37--Full committee hearings on ballistic 
missile defense. February 28 and March 14, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-38--Full committee hearing on United States 
policy toward Iraq. September 26, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-39--Full committee hearing on United States 
security challenges posed by China. March 20, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-40--Full committee hearing on challenges posed 
by Russia to United States national security interests. June 
13, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-41--Subcommittee on Military Research and 
Development joint hearing with Subcommittee on Fisheries, 
Wildlife and Oceans on oceanography. December 6, 1995.
    H.N.S.C. 104-42--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee hearing on infrastructure requirements to support 
the Army strategic mobility program. September 12, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-43--Full committee hearing on the June 25, 
1996, terrorist attack against United States military forces in 
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. September 18, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-44--Full committee hearing to honor retiring 
members. September 25, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-45--Full committee hearing on extremist 
activity in the military. June 25, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-46--Military Personnel Subcommittee on H.R. 
4000, restoration of missing persons act. September 10, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-47--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
the status of POW/MIA negotiations with North Korea. June 20, 
1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-48--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on accident investigations of recent F-14 and AV-8B mishaps. 
April 16, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-49--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee and Military Procurement Subcommittee joint 
hearings on proliferation threats and missile defense 
responses. April 4, 1995; February 29; March 7, 21; June 18, 
20; September 27, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-50--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
the presidential determination of ``full faith cooperation'' by 
Vietnam on POW/MIA matters. June 19, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-51--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
POW/MIA matters. September 17, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-52--Merchant Marine Special Oversight Panel 
hearing on H.R. 2754, OECD Shipbuilding Trade Agreement. April 
22, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-53--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on Department of Energy oversight. September 19, 1996.
    H.N.S.C. 104-54--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee and Military Procurement Subcommittee joint 
hearing on TACAIR. June 27, 1996.

                                                  HOUSE REPORTS                                                 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Report number                  Date filed            Bill number                    Title            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
104-18, part 1....................  Feb. 6, 1995.........  H.R. 7...............  To revitalize the national    
                                                                                   security of the United       
                                                                                   States.                      
104-28, part 2....................  Feb. 14, 1995........  H.R. 256.............  To withdraw and reserve       
                                                                                   certain public lands and     
                                                                                   minerals within the State of 
                                                                                   Colorado for military uses,  
                                                                                   and for other purposes.      
104-107, part 2...................  June 1, 1995.........  H.R. 1141............  To amend the Act popularly    
                                                                                   known as the ``Sikes Act'' to
                                                                                   enhance fish and wildlife    
                                                                                   conservation, and natural    
                                                                                   resources management         
                                                                                   programs.                    
104-131...........................  June 1, 1995.........  H.R. 1530............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for fiscal year 1996 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, to    
                                                                                   prescribe military personnel 
                                                                                   strengths for fiscal year    
                                                                                   1996, and for other purposes.
104-220...........................  Aug. 1, 1995.........  H.J. Res. 102........  Disapproving the              
                                                                                   recommendations of the       
                                                                                   Defense Base Closure and     
                                                                                   Realignment Commission.      
104-229...........................  Aug. 3, 1995.........  H.R. 1350............  To amend the Merchant Marine  
                                                                                   Act, 1936 to revitalize the  
                                                                                   United States-flag merchant  
                                                                                   marine, and for other        
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-280, Volumes I and II.........  Oct. 17, 1995........  H.R. 2491............  To provide for reconciliation 
                                                                                   pursuant to section 105 of   
                                                                                   the concurrent resolution on 
                                                                                   the budget for fiscal year   
                                                                                   1996. [Volume I contains     
                                                                                   Titles I-XII; Volume II      
                                                                                   contains Titles XIII-XX.     
                                                                                   Title VIII is National       
                                                                                   Security Committee title.]   
104-350, parts 1 and 2............  Nov. 16, 1995........  H.R. 2491, conference  To provide for reconciliation 
                                                            report.                pursuant to section 105 of   
                                                                                   the concurrent resolution on 
                                                                                   the budget for fiscal year   
                                                                                   1996. [Part 1 contains       
                                                                                   conference report; Part 2    
                                                                                   contains statement of        
                                                                                   managers.]                   
104-406...........................  Dec. 13, 1995........  H.R. 1530, conference  To authorize appropriations   
                                                            report.                for fiscal year 1996 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, for   
                                                                                   military construction, and   
                                                                                   for defense activities of the
                                                                                   Department of Energy, to     
                                                                                   prescribe personnel strengths
                                                                                   for such fiscal year for the 
                                                                                   Armed Forces, and for other  
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-427...........................  Dec. 20, 1995........  H.R. 1655, conference  To authorize appropriations   
                                                            report.                for fiscal year 1996 for     
                                                                                   intelligence and intelligence-
                                                                                   related activities of the    
                                                                                   United States Government, the
                                                                                   Community Management Account,
                                                                                   and the Central Intelligence 
                                                                                   Agency Retirement and        
                                                                                   Disability System, and for   
                                                                                   other purposes.              
104-450...........................  Jan. 22, 1996........  S. 1124 (H.R. 1530),   To authorize appropriations   
                                                            conference report.     for fiscal year 1996 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, to    
                                                                                   prescribe personnel strengths
                                                                                   for such fiscal year for the 
                                                                                   Armed Forces, and for other  
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-524, part 2...................  May 30, 1996.........  H.R. 2754............  To approve and implement the  
                                                                                   OECD Shipbuilding Trade      
                                                                                   Agreement.                   
104-563...........................  May 7, 1996..........  H.R. 3230............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for fiscal year 1997 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, to    
                                                                                   prescribe military personnel 
                                                                                   strengths for fiscal year    
                                                                                   1997, and for other purposes.
104-583, part 1...................  May 16, 1996.........  H.R. 3144............  To establish a United States  
                                                                                   policy for the deployment of 
                                                                                   a national missile defense   
                                                                                   system, and for other        
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-620, part 2...................  July 23, 1996........  H.R. 3237............  To provide for improved       
                                                                                   management and operation of  
                                                                                   intelligence activities of   
                                                                                   the Government by providing  
                                                                                   for a more corporate approach
                                                                                   to intelligence, to          
                                                                                   reorganize the agencies of   
                                                                                   the Government engaged in    
                                                                                   intelligence activities so as
                                                                                   to provide an improved       
                                                                                   Intelligence Community for   
                                                                                   the 21st century, and for    
                                                                                   other purposes.              
104-642, part 1...................  June 27, 1996........  H.R. 3308............  To amend title 10, United     
                                                                                   States Code, to limit the    
                                                                                   placement of United States   
                                                                                   forces under United Nations  
                                                                                   operational or tactical      
                                                                                   control, and for other       
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-724...........................  July 30, 1996........  H.R. 3230, conference  To authorize appropriations   
                                                            report.                for fiscal year 1997 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, for   
                                                                                   military construction, and   
                                                                                   for defense activities of the
                                                                                   Department of Energy, to     
                                                                                   prescribe personnel strengths
                                                                                   for such fiscal year for the 
                                                                                   Armed Forces, and for other  
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-804, part 1...................  Sept. 17, 1996.......  H. Con. Res. 180.....  Commending the Americans who  
                                                                                   served the United States     
                                                                                   during the period known as   
                                                                                   the Cold War.                
104-805...........................  Sept. 17, 1996.......  H. Con. Res. 200.....  Expressing the sense of the   
                                                                                   Congress regarding the       
                                                                                   bombing in Dhahran, Saudi    
                                                                                   Arabia.                      
104-806...........................  Sept. 17, 1996.......  H.R. 4000............  To amend title 10, United     
                                                                                   States Code, to restore the  
                                                                                   provisions of chapter 76 of  
                                                                                   that title (relating to      
                                                                                   missing persons) as in effect
                                                                                   before the amendments made by
                                                                                   the National Defense         
                                                                                   Authorization Act for Fiscal 
                                                                                   Year 1997.                   
104-832...........................  Sept. 24, 1996.......  H.R. 3259, conference  To authorize appropriations   
                                                            report.                for fiscal year 1997 for     
                                                                                   intelligence and intelligence-
                                                                                   related activities of the    
                                                                                   United States Government, the
                                                                                   Community Management Account,
                                                                                   and the Central Intelligence 
                                                                                   Agency Retirement and        
                                                                                   Disability System, and for   
                                                                                   other purposes.              
104-837, part 1...................  Sept. 25, 1996.......  H.R. 3142............  To establish a demonstration  
                                                                                   project to provide that the  
                                                                                   Department of Defense may    
                                                                                   receive Medicare             
                                                                                   reimbursement for health care
                                                                                   services provided to certain 
                                                                                   Medicare-eligible covered    
                                                                                   military beneficiaries.      
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                   PUBLIC LAWS                                                  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Law number                  Date approved           Bill number                    Title            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
104-93............................  Jan. 6, 1996.........  H.R. 1655............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for fiscal year 1996 for     
                                                                                   intelligence and intelligence-
                                                                                   related activities of the    
                                                                                   United States Government, the
                                                                                   Community Management Account,
                                                                                   and the Central Intelligence 
                                                                                   Agency Retirement and        
                                                                                   Disability System, and for   
                                                                                   other purposes.              
104-106...........................  Feb. 10, 1996........  S. 1124..............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for (H.R. 1530) fiscal year  
                                                                                   1996 for military activities 
                                                                                   of the Department of Defense,
                                                                                   for military construction,   
                                                                                   and for defense activities of
                                                                                   the Department of Energy, to 
                                                                                   prescribe personnel strengths
                                                                                   for such fiscal year for the 
                                                                                   Armed Forces, to reform      
                                                                                   acquisition laws and         
                                                                                   information technology       
                                                                                   management of the Federal    
                                                                                   Government, and for other    
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-201...........................  Sept. 23, 1996.......  H.R. 3230............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for fiscal year 1997 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, for   
                                                                                   military construction, and   
                                                                                   for defense activities of the
                                                                                   Department of Energy, to     
                                                                                   prescribe personnel strengths
                                                                                   for such fiscal year for the 
                                                                                   Armed Forces, and for other  
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-239...........................  Oct. 8, 1996.........  H.R. 1350............  To amend the merchant Marine  
                                                                                   Act, 1936 to revitalize the  
                                                                                   United States-flag merchant  
                                                                                   marine, and for other        
                                                                                   purposes.                    
104-293...........................  Oct. 11, 1996........  H.R. 3259............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for fiscal year 1997 for     
                                                                                   intelligence-related         
                                                                                   activities of the United     
                                                                                   States Government, the       
                                                                                   Community Management Account,
                                                                                   and the Central Intelligence 
                                                                                   Agency Retirement and        
                                                                                   Disability System, and for   
                                                                                   other purposes.              
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                     VETOES                                                     
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Document number              Date transmitted         Bill number                    Title            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
104-155...........................  Dec. 28, 1995........  H.R. 1530............  To authorize appropriations   
                                                                                   for fiscal year 1996 for     
                                                                                   military activities of the   
                                                                                   Department of Defense, for   
                                                                                   military construction, and   
                                                                                   for defense activities of the
                                                                                   Department of Energy, to     
                                                                                   prescribe personnel strengths
                                                                                   for such fiscal year for the 
                                                                                   Armed Forces, and for other  
                                                                                   purposes.                    
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    HOUSE NATIONAL SECURITY COMMITTEE PRESS RELEASES, 104TH CONGRESS

                             First Session

    January 5, 1995--Spence Announces Leadership of House 
National Security Committee.
    January 10, 1995--Statement of Floyd Spence, Chairman, 
House Committee on National Security, on CBO's Analysis of the 
Defense Budget Shortfall.
    January 24, 1995--Spence Announces Additional National 
Security Committee Assignments.
    February 1, 1995--National Security Committee Adopts H.R. 7 
on Bipartisan Vote, Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence.
    February 13, 1995--Chairman Spence Announces Panel 
Assignments.
    February 17, 1995--Spence Statement on House Passage of the 
National Security Revitalization Act.
    February 22, 1995--Spence Asks Hunter and Weldon to Lead 
Missile Defense Efforts.
    February 24, 1995--Chairmen Clinger and Spence Announce 
Acquisition Reform Effort.
    March 16, 1995--Congressional Leadership to Clinton: 
Suspend Intelligence Sharing with UN.
    March 29, 1995--Army Concludes Investigation of Ranger 
Training Fatalities.
    April 4, 1995--Spence Outlines ``Second Hundred Days'' 
Defense Agenda: Pentagon Reform, Weapons Modernization Top 
Priorities.
    April 7, 1995--National Security Committee Delegation 
Departs for Asia, Persian Gulf.
    April 25, 1995--National Security Committee Delegation to 
Visit Guantanamo, Central America.
    May 3, 1995--Spence on Bomber Study: An Endorsement of the 
Status Quo.
    May 4, 1995--House Chairman to Clinton: Don't Limit Theater 
Defense in ABM Treaty.
    May 10, 1995--Spence Supports Budget Committee Defense 
Plan.
    May 15, 1995--House Chairmen Oppose Limits on Missile 
Defenses.
    May 17, 1995--National Security Subcommittees Advance 
Quality of Life Initiatives.
    May 18. 1995--Readiness, Reform, Quality of Life 
Initiatives Approved in National Security Subcommittees.
    May 19, 1995--Federal Acquisition Reform Act of 1995 Cuts 
Red Tape, Will Cut Cost of Federal Purchasing.
    May 25, 1995--Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence: At the 
Conclusion of the House National Security Committee Markup of 
the Fiscal 1996 National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 1530).
    May 26, 1995--1996 Defense Bill Funds South Carolina 
Projects.
    May 26, 1995--FY 1996 National Defense Authorization Act in 
Brief Restoring Our National Defense.
    June 7, 1995--Spence to Administration: Stop Conducting 
Bosnia Policy ``On the Fly''.
    June 13, 1995--Spence Applauds House B-2 Decision.
    June 14, 1995--Spence Applauds House Action on Missile 
Defense.
    June 15, 1995--House Endorses National Security Committee 
Defense Priorities.
    June 23, 1995--Statement by Chairman Floyd D. Spence on 
Defense Budget Compromise.
    June 29, 1995--Armey, Spence Urge President to Keep 
Politics Out of BRAC Process.
    June 30, 1995--National Security Committee Hearing to 
Examine Blackhawk Shootdown.
    July 13, 1995--Spence Letter: Defense Bills Improve Quality 
of Service Life.
    August 1, 1995--Fact Sheet: Budget Reconciliation Actions 
in National Security Committee, Markup of H. Con. Res. 67.
    August 1, 1995--National Security Committee Completes FY96 
Budget Reconciliation Action.
    September 14, 1995--Spence Works Out Alternative to ``High 
One'' Military Retirement Problem.
    September 20, 1995--National Security Committee Votes to 
Kill ``High One''.
    October 6, 1995--Statement by Floyd D. Spence on the 
Decision to Relax Supercomputer Export Restriction.
    October 16, 1995--National Security Committee to Hold 
Hearings on Bosnia.
    November 27, 1995--Spence: ``Unconvinced'' by President's 
Bosnia Speech.
    December 13, 1995--Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence at 
the Conclusion of the House-Senate Conference on the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996.
    December 13, 1995--National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1996: Summary of Conference Report.
    December 15, 1995--1996 Defense Bill Funds South Carolina 
Projects.
    December 15, 1995--1996 Defense Bill Conference Report 
Clears House.
    December 22, 1995--Speaker, Majority Leader to President: 
Sign Defense Authorization Bill.
    December 28, 1995--Spence Response to Clinton Veto.

                             Second Session

    January 3, 1996--House Votes on Clinton Veto on Defense 
Bill.
    January 19, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence at the 
Conclusion of the House-Senate Conference on S. 1124, the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996.
    February 16, 1996--Spence Statement on Administration BMD 
Announcement.
    March 1, 1996--Chairman Spence Responds to Pentagon Budget 
Request.
    March 7, 1996--Statement by U.S. Rep. Floyd Spence, 
Chairman of the House National Security Committee, on the 
Firing of Chinese Missiles Against the Coast of Taiwan.
    March 14, 1996--Statement of Honorable Floyd D. Spence, 
Full Committee Hearing on BMD.
    March 21, 1996--Spence Responds to the Secretary of the 
Army's Task Force on Extremist Activities.
    March 21, 1996--Spence Cosponsors ``Defend America Act of 
1996''.
    March 28, 1996--Spence Statement on DIA Report on North 
Korea.
    April 18, 1996--Spence Appoints Submarine Panel Members.
    May 1, 1996--Summary of Major Provisions: National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 as Reported by the House 
Committee on National Security.
    May 1, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd D. Spence at the 
Conclusion of the Mark-up for the Fiscal Year 1997 National 
Defense Authorization Act.
    May 1, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd D. Spence Upon the 
Mark-up of H.R. 3144, the Defend America Act of 1996, and H.R. 
3308, the United States Armed Forces Protection Act of 1996.
    May 14, 1996--Opening Remarks by the Honorable Floyd 
Spence, Chairman, House National Security Committee, on H.R. 
3230, FY 97 DOD Authorization Bill.
    May 15, 1996--House Votes to Revitalize National Defense.
    June 6, 1996--CBO Scores Limited NMD Systems.
    June 6, 1996--Opening Statement, Chairman Floyd D. Spence, 
Full Committee Hearing on Post-Cold War/ National Strategy.
    June 12, 1996--Spence Responds to Second Bosnia Mission.
    June 13, 1996--Statement by Chairman Floyd Spence, Full 
Committee Hearing, Challenges Posed by Russia to U.S. National 
Security Interests.
    June 25, 1996--Chairman Spence Opening Statement Hearing on 
extremist Activity in the Military.
    July 30, 1996--H.R. 3230, Fiscal Year 1997 National Defense 
Authorization Act, Conference Report, Summary of Major 
Provisions.
    July 31, 1996--National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1997: South Carolina Projects.
    August 14, 1996--Statement of Floyd D. Spence on the Report 
on the Bombing of Khobar Towers.
    September 3, 1996--Statement by Chairman Floyd D. Spence on 
the U.S. Attack on Iraq.
    September 5, 1996--House Votes to Protect U.S. Armed 
Forces.
    September 12, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd D. Spence 
upon the Mark-up of H.R. 4000, Amending Current Law to Restore 
Certain Provisions of U.S. Code Relating to Missing Persons.
    September 12, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd D. Spence 
upon the Mark-up of H.R. 3142, the Uniformed Services Medicare 
Subvention Demonstration Project Act.
    September 12, 1996--GAO Report Validates GOP Concerns on 
Foreign Missile Threats.
    September 16, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd D. Spence, 
Reaction to Release of Downing Report on Saudi Bombing.
    September 18, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence, 
Full Committee Hearing on Khobar Towers Bombing.
    September 24, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence as 
Delivered for Floor Consideration of H. Con. Res. 200.
    September 25, 1996--Spence Calls for Clinton Administration 
to Come Clean on Bosnia Policy.
    September 25, 1996--Statement by Floyd Spence, Chairman, 
House National Security Committee, Hearing on Future of U.S. 
Policy in Bosnia.
    September 26, 1996--Spence Calls Administration's Iraq 
Policy a Failure.
    September 26, 1996--Opening Statement of Chairman Floyd 
Spence, Hearing on Iraq.
    October 30, 1996--Spence Blasts Administration's Management 
of Nuclear Stockpile.
    November 14, 1996--Statement by U.S. Rep. Floyd D. Spence, 
Chairman, House National Security Committee, on the Continued 
Commitment of U.S. Ground Forces to Bosnia.
    November 19, 1996--Chairman Spence Responds to Allegations 
of Sexual Misconduct in the U.S. Army.
    November 21, 1996--Administration China Export Policy 
Jeopardizes U.S. National Security.
    November 21, 1996--Press Availability on Oversight into 
Allegations of Sexual Misconduct in the U.S. Army.
    December 5, 1996--Statement of Chairman Floyd Spence on the 
White House Nomination of Senator Bill Cohen as Secretary of 
Defense.


                                <greek-d>