SENATE RESOLUTION 227--EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE MAY 11, 1998 INDIAN NUCLEAR TESTS (Senate - May 12, 1998)

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Mrs. FEINSTEIN (for herself, Mr. Brownback, and Mr. Glenn) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations:

S. Res. 227

Whereas the Government of India conducted an underground nuclear explosion on May 15, 1974;

Whereas since the 1974 nuclear test by the Government of India, the United States and its allies have worked extensively to prevent the further proliferation of nuclear weapons in South Asia;

Whereas on May 11, 1998, the Government of India conducted underground tests of three separate nuclear explosive devices, including a fission device, a low-yield device, and a thermo-nuclear device;

Whereas this decision by the Government of India has needlessly raised tension in the South Asia region and threatens to exacerbate the nuclear arms race in that region;

Whereas the five declared nuclear weapons states and 144 other nations have signed the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty in hopes of putting a permanent end to nuclear testing;

Whereas the Government of India has refused to sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty;

Whereas the Government of India has refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty;

Whereas India has refused to enter into a safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency covering any of its nuclear research facilities;

Whereas the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 1994 requires the President to impose a variety of aid and trade sanctions against any non-nuclear weapons state that detonates a nuclear explosive device; Therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Senate

(1) Condemns in the strongest possible terms the decision of the Government of India to conduct three nuclear tests on May 11, 1998;

(2) Calls upon the President to carry out the provisions of the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 1994 with respect to India and invoke all sanctions therein;

(3) Calls upon the Government of India to take immediate steps to reduce tensions that this unilateral and unnecessary step has caused;

(4) Expresses its regret that this decision by the Government of India will, of necessity, negatively affect relations between the United States and India;

(5) Urges the Government of Pakistan, the Government of the People's Republic of China, and all governments to exercise restraint in response to the Indian nuclear tests, in order to avoid further exacerbating the nuclear arms race in South Asia;

(6) Calls upon all governments in the region to take steps to prevent further proliferation of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles; and

(7) Urges the Government of India to enter into a safeguards agreement with the International Atomic energy Agency which would cover all Indian nuclear research facilities at the earliest possible time.

Mrs. FEINSTEIN. Mr. President, at this time, on behalf of Senator Brownback, Senator Glenn, and myself, I send to the desk for reference to committee a sense-of-the-Senate resolution which, in essence, deals with the explosion of three nuclear devices by the Government of India yesterday. As this body well knows, the Government of India conducted underground tests on three separate nuclear explosive devices, including a fission device, a low-yield device, and a thermonuclear device. They did this also very close to the border of Pakistan, thereby raising tensions between the two countries and in the entire south Asia region.

This sense of the Senate will condemn that explosion in the strongest possible terms and will call upon the President of the United States to carry out the provisions of the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 1994 with respect to India and invoke all sanctions therein.

It will also call upon the Government of India to take immediate steps to reduce tensions that this unilateral and unnecessary step has caused.

I am aware that Senator Brownback's subcommittee, of which I am a member, will be meeting tomorrow, and will be discussing this issue, and, hopefully, will be able to agree to this resolution.

I am delighted to work with the Senator, and I note that he is present on the floor at this time, so I will say no more but simply send this to the desk.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Kansas.

Mr. BROWNBACK. Mr. President, I would like to note my support for the resolution of my colleague from California. I think this is an important, quick statement for us to be making to the Government of India and to the nations in the region, both Pakistan and China in particular. The nuclear test that took place yesterday will have a tremendously destabilizing impact in the region. It was a bad move on the part of the Government of India. I think this is something the U.S. Senate needs to speak out on clearly and quickly, to state our displeasure, and that this will have consequences to it. I urge the administration to put forward the sanctions that are called for in the Glenn amendment. I don't think we can stand by and tolerate the sort of actions that have taken place. I urge my colleagues to look at this resolution, to sign on. Hopefully, we can pass this in an expedited fashion.