1998 Congressional Hearings
Special Weapons
Nuclear, Chemical, Biological and Missile


THE CRISIS IN SOUTH ASIA

Senator Sam Brownback

Senate Foreign Relations Committee
Near East and South Asia Subcommittee
03 June 1998



CRISIS IN SOUTH ASIA -- PART II



OPENING STATEMENT BY SENATOR SAM BROWNBACK, SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS
SUBCOMMITTEE ON NEAR EAST AND SOUTH ASIA
JUNE 3, 1998



The world became a much less stable place just three short weeks ago.
I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that as the world looks on,
India and Pakistan are playing nuclear tic-tac-toe. South Asia is in a
nuclear cold war, and an unstable one at that. Neither state has a
nuclear doctrine; neither state has made a credible commitment to
forswear first use. Indeed, neither state has promised to end testing.
Nuclear war is only a small step away.


In May, I introduced an amendment to the Department of Defense
Authorization bill repealing the Pressler Amendment. In doing so I
hoped to give Pakistan a tangible alternative to conducting its own
nuclear testing. My efforts, as well as incentives offered by the
Administration.


Needless to say, I am withdrawing my amendment to repeal Pressler, and
at the same time I intend to offer a resolution strongly condemning
India and Pakistan for conducting these nuclear tests.


The question before us today, very simply, is what to do. While the
imposition of wide ranging sanctions was an inevitable first step, we
are going to have to look beyond sanctions to solve the current
crisis. There are a number of key steps which I believe we can take.


It is not enough that the United States sanction India and Pakistan;
we must get the international community to act in concert with us
towards South Asia. We must begin to focus on the heart of the
Indo-Pakistani conflict -- Kashmir. We are not only talking about the
fate of a disputed state in the Himalayas here; we are talking about
the national security interests of the United States and its allies in
averting war. We plead with the leaders of Pakistan and India not to
make any provocative moves in or around Kashmir.


I believe we must continue to engage India and Pakistan. To do
otherwise would be folly. Yesterday I met with Pakistan's Senate
Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, and tomorrow I will be meeting
with the Indian Ambassador to the United States. Today's hearing is an
indication of the concern we in the Senate have over events in South
Asia. I look forward to a good discussion from our witnesses. We have
with us today Assistant Secretary of State for Near East and South
Asia, The Honorable Karl Inderfurth, Dr. William Schneider, Jr.,
President, International Planning Services, Inc. and an Adjunct Fellow
of the Hudson Institute. Dr. Schneider formerly served as Under
Secretary of State for Security Assistance, Science and Technology.
Finally, Dr. Richard Haas, Director of Foreign Policy Studies,
Brookings Institute. Dr. Haas formerly served as Senior Director for
Near East and South Asia at the National Security Council.


Mr. Inderfurth, if you please, we will begin with you.



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