Table of
Contents

APPENDIX F

SAFETY

This appendix provides examples and guidelines concerning safety issues prior to or during combat operations. It also provides some basic rules of safety. Commanders or their representatives must ensure that safety is an ongoing process during wartime, as well as during peacetime training. Each unit must refer to basic regulations and directives for additional information.

ADMINISTRATIVE

Commanders and leaders must be involved in the function of safety in their unit. The following are some administrative safety considerations.

SOPs

The commander must ensure that the safety annex of the unit tactical SOP is current and covers all field training operations.

The commander and or safety officer must be familiar with the safety portions of the SOPs.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The commander ensures that adequate provisions for safe practices, procedures, and physical standards are incorporated into unit functions, activities, exercises, and combat operations. The unit safety officer must keep the commander informed of the unit safety status by reporting all accidents, injuries, and incidents, and recommending corrective actions.

RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS

Every training exercise or combat operation carries with it inherent risk. Identifying, evaluating, and reducing risk are leader tasks. The following are methods for evaluating risk:

How great the risk is.

VEHICLE MOVEMENT AND CONVOYS

Vehicle movements and convoys require leaders to think about safety. The following list is not comprehensive, but is meant to be a start for building a complete safety list for movements:

SAFETY FROM RF RADIATION HAZARDS AND LAUNCHER BACKBLAST

Patriot equipment represents a significant threat to safety if procedures are not properly adhered to. The following list, also not comprehensive, is a look at some things leaders must consider when operating Patriot equipment: