News 1998 Army Science and Technology Master Plan



Science and Technology Objectives

To provide guidance to the S&T community, the Army has established a set of 200 Science and Technology Objectives. A STO states a specific, measurable, major technological advancement to be achieved by a specific fiscal year (Figure I–9). It must be consistent with the funding available in the current year budget, the Future–Years Defense Plan (FYDP), and the Program Objective Memorandum (POM). Not every worthwhile funded 6.2 and 6.3 technology program will be cited as a STO in part because the Army must reserve some program flexibility for the laboratory or center director to seize opportunities within his or her organization, based upon the organization’s local talents and resources.

Figure I-9. Anatomy of an STO
Figure I-9. Anatomy of an STO

The Army uses the STOs to focus and stabilize the 6.2 and 6.3 program, practice management by objectives, and provide feedback to our scientists and engineers regarding their productivity and customer satisfaction. STOs are reviewed annually at a joint materiel developer/TRADOC meeting and then reviewed and approved by the ASTWG (Figure I–10). STOs, revised as necessary to maintain currency and consistency with economic factors, ensure TRADOC input to the planning process, and provide Army leadership guidance to S&T performing organizations. All Army Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System (PPBES) submissions, including budget estimates and execution plans and Defense Technology Objectives (DTOs), should comply with the STO guidance. Descriptions of current STOs are given in Volume II, Annex A, of this document and in the Army Science and Technology Management Information System (ASTMIS).

Figure I-10. Science and Technology Objective Process
Figure I-10. Science and Technology Objective Process

Resourcing the Strategy

Figure I–11 shows how the 6.1, 6.2, and 6.3 funding categories relate to the overall acquisition process. Figure I–12 shows Army S&T recent and future funding levels.

Figure I-11. Science and Technology Related to the Aquistion Process
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Figure I-11. Science and Technology Related to the Aquistion Process

Figure I-12. Science and Technology Program Funding by Budget Category
Figure I-12. Science and Technology Program Funding by Budget Category

The 6.1 research includes all efforts of scientific study and experimentation with a high potential to significantly improve land warfighting capabilities. In this basic research category (6.1), the Army maintains a strong peer–reviewed scientific base providing the foundation for technological improvements to warfighting capability through university and in–house research. In addition to conducting in–house research, Army scientists monitor developments in academia and industry and evaluate the many proposals received for 6.1 funds (Figure I–13). (See also Chapters V and VII.)

Figure I-13. Army Basic Research
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Figure I-13. Army Basic Research

Applied Research (6.2) includes all efforts directed toward the solution of specific military problems, short of major demonstrations and development projects. This applied research category includes the development of components, models, and new concepts through in–house and industry efforts. Individual research programs often enable a variety of new systems and support a number of identified needs. Since research programs may readily contribute to needs in several mission areas, the Army performs horizontal integration, or "cross–mission–area analyses," to understand 6.2 funding priorities.

Advanced Technology Development (6.3) includes all efforts directed toward projects that have moved into demonstration of hardware or software for operational feasibility. In the 6.3 category, experimental systems or subsystems are demonstrated to prove the technical feasibility and military utility of the approach selected. Advanced technology development (6.3) provides the path for the rapid insertion of new technologies into Army systems, be they new systems or product improvements. The Army establishes priorities for demonstrations that are needed prior to the development of the most critically needed systems and product improvements. The criteria for selection of 6.3 programs are:

- Reduce risks to funded 6.4 programs.
- Reduce casualties across the spectrum of conflict, including asymmetric threats.

- Breakthroughs in battlefield capabilities for reasonable investment.
- Low–cost upgrade opportunities.

Figure I–14 shows the Army S&T FY98 6.3 appropriated program and includes ATDs, ACTDs, and TDs, many of which form system–of–systems demonstrations.

The Army policy is to maintain stable funding for Army S&T. This stability principle of our investment strategy is consistent with the long–term nature of basic and applied research. Stability of focus and funding permits the Army’s scientists and engineers to conduct meaningful long–range planning to ensure that the technologies required to address future warfighting needs and obtain AAN goals will be available when needed. Figure I–15 shows the FY98 S&T appropriation by program and developing agency.

Figure I-14. FY98 6.3 Appropriated Program Total = $657.5 Million
Figure I-14. FY98 6.3 Appropriated Program
Total = $657.5 Million

Figure I-15. FY98 Science and Technology (6.1, 6.2, 6.3) Appropriated Program
Figure I-15. FY98 Science and Technology
(6.1, 6.2, 6.3) Appropriated Program

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