Print Page

U.S. Arms Transfers: Government Data 


American arms manufacturers have two major channels through which they can sell major weaponry to foreign countries: foreign military sales ("FMS"), in which a government-to-government agreement is negotiated by the Pentagon; and direct commercial sales ("DCS"), in which industry negotiates directly with the purchasing country and must apply for a license from the State Department.

The United States government also transfers arms to other countries by giving away weapons from U.S.military stocks for free or at greatly reduced prices, classified as excess defense articles (EDA) or emergency "drawdowns." The United States also provides military training to many foreign countries. These transfers are also managed by the Defense Department. For more information about types of U.S.arms transfers, read the "Ways and Means" chapter of The Arms Trade Revealed.

FAS Databases

back to top

Other Databases

back to top

Reports:

Section 655 Reports | Section 36(a) Reports |FMS Facts | Section 1231 Report | ATF | CRS | US Census Bureau | World Bank Statistics | WMEAT | Section 7010 Report | Budget Justifications | Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

"Section 655" Reports to Congress:

back to reports

Foreign Military Sales, Foreign Military Construction Sales and Military Assistance Facts is published by the Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation Agency; the most current online edition includes information through FY 2009.

back to reports

Section 36(a) report to Congress:

back to reports

Section 1231 Report:

back to reports

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives,

"Firearms Commerce in the United States" "Annual Firearms Manufacturers and Export Report"

back to reports

Congressional Research Service

back to reports 

U.S. arms deliveries, category totals, 1994-1998. 1999. U.S. Census Bureau data, collected from shippers' export declarations, sorted by commodity type; includes specific recipient data from the Government Information Sharing Project. Recent U.S. customs data can be accessed through UN Comtrade's database.

World Bank Statistics on States' Arms Imports and Exports, as percentage of total imports and exports, 1990-1999.

back to reports

World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers (WMEAT) is published by the U.S. State Department. Starting with the 1997 edition, the WMEAT report includes estimates of direct commercial sales based on licenses authorized. Prior to the 1997 report, figures for U.S. arms sales were probably understated.

The following reports are available in pdf format:

  1. Introduction
  2. Highlights: Military Expenditures
  3. Highlights: Armed Forces
  4. Highlights: Arms Transfers
  5. Highlights: Military Burden
  6. Regional Trends
  7. Country Rankings
  8. Table 1: Military Expenditures and Economic Indicators
  9. Table 2: Arms Deliveries and Total Trade
  10. Table 3: Arms Deliveries by Supplier and Recipient
  11. Table 4: Arms Agreements and Deliveries
  12. Table 5: Weapons Deliveries by Supplier and Type
  13. Statistical Notes

back to reports 

Section 7010: Quarterly Report on Foreign Military Financing, International Military Education and Training, and Peacekeeping Operaitons funds

Congressional Budget Justifications for Foreign Operations (Supporting Information section):

back to reports 

Afghanistan Security Forces Fund Purchases, Fiscal Years 2006-2010

back to reports 

U.S. Army Weapons System Handbook contains detailed descriptions of many U.S. military weapons systems.

For a general guide to key sources of data and analysis on the arms trade, check out the "For More Information" chapter of The Arms Trade Revealed: a Guide for Investigators and Activists.  

 back to top